Morning Links

Friday, November 9th, 2012

I’ve been neglecting you. But just think, in the spring you’ll have your own portable collection of groin-punching, blood-pressure raising stories to pull down off your bookshelf—any time you like!

I do have some thoughts about the election. I just don’t have time to put them into a more substantive post at the moment. And they’re more about the various ballot measures than the election itself. Summary: I think that for the most part, there’s lots of reason for optimism in Tuesday night’s results. Even on the GOP side, the one Republican senator who managed to win a competitive Senate seat this week was Jeff Flake, a devoted fiscal conservative and principled advocate for limited government who also happens to be pro-immigration, pro-internet gambling, favors ending the sanctions with Cuba, and who generally avoids the culture wars. He’s a huge improvement over his predecessor. And he won in a state filled with Latinos and rock-ribbed conservatives. He’s a template for the rest of the party.

On to the links:

  • Cop tries to kill dog during drug raid, shoots fellow cop instead.
  • “The Permanent Militarization of America.”
  • In Colorado, legalization of marijuana got more votes than Obama.
  • Carlos Miller wins again. And how he’s suing the cops who deleted the video depicting his illegal arrest. You’d think Miami police would know to just leave him the hell alone.
  • North Korean court rules that the country’s military can torture dissidents with impunity.
  • A new front in the war on vegetable gardens. Don’t know about you, but if these stories ending up pitting the militant locavores and anti-obesity paternalists in an epic battle with the petty zoning tyrants . . . I’m making popcorn.
  • Hey, remember when super PACs were going to destroy American democracy? Not so much. Of course, when the anti-Citizens United crowd would say things like “this will destroy American democracy,” they actually meant, “this will help the candidates I don’t like!” Which means that if and when the GOP ever gets its act together (more likely: when they Democrats inevitably overplay their hand), we’ll be back to blaming money in politics for election results again.
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38 Responses to “Morning Links”

  1. #1 |  mb | 

    Bookshelf? There had better be a kindle edition if you want me to buy it. And I will.

  2. #2 |  Burgers Allday | 

    My guess is that the policeman in the Memphis case wasn’t actually trying to shoot the dog, but that that sounded better than: mistook fellow officer for an occupant.

    btw, they had animal control seize all the dogs apparently.

  3. #3 |  Burgers Allday | 

    Oh, yeah, and the Iraq War was about oil, contra the linked article on militarization. It wasn’t about “decreasing the cost of oli for end users,” but it certainly was about the oil.

  4. #4 |  David | 

    The partisan Republican suffering has been delicious thus far. It’s almost identical to the Democrats’ 2004 vintage. “But but but but the guy in office now really sucks! Why wouldn’t they vote for an animatronic block of wood instead of him? DEMOCRACY IS OVER FOREVER!”

  5. #5 |  karl | 

    This Arizona liberal voted for Carmona (only once); even so, Flake is really is a huge (HUGE!) improvement over the uberhack Kyl.

  6. #6 |  Aresen | 

    I’ve been neglecting you. But just think, in the spring you’ll have your own portable collection of groin-punching, blood-pressure raising stories to pull down off your bookshelf—any time you like!

    I can think of nine people (Nazgul?) who should be forced to read it.

  7. #7 |  Dante | 

    RE: Carlos Miller

    A common theme has re-appeared in this case: The police erased the cell phone video, which removed evidence. Tampering with evidence is a felony when a citizen does it.

    Why don’t the police get charged with a felony when they commit the same crime? Oh, yeah ……. I forgot.

    Protect & Serve (Themselves!)

  8. #8 |  Aresen | 

    I’m kinda thinking that if the North Korean Court HADN’T ruled that way, they would have been labelled ‘dissidents’.

    TBS, I am a little boggled that there was even such a case in a North Korean court.

  9. #9 |  David | 

    Yeah, the idea that North Korea even maintains a polite fiction that the courts can tell the military what they’re allowed to do is the most surprising part of that story.

  10. #10 |  Eric Hanneken | 

    I assume the reference to a “North Korean court” was a joke, since the linked article is actually about a U.S. appeals court ruling that Donald Rumsfeld’s victims aren’t able to sue him.

  11. #11 |  Jim Collins | 

    Popcorn with lots of butter and a 64 oz. soda.

  12. #12 |  Dave | 

    From your WaPo article (which, despite the title, is really saying that super PAC money was not effective in getting results in elections, not that it did not influence them)

    “The deluge fueled a campaign arms race of sorts, as candidates in both parties increasingly focused on raising as much cash as possible for fear of what the other side had in store.”

    “Many targeted candidates in both parties complained that super-PAC money distorted their races and forced them to spend valuable time seeking money and mounting a defense rather than discussing issues.”

    The pernicious impact of unlimited super PAC money is not just the possibility it can “buy” an election. It causes politicians who are already too fundraising focused to become even more focused on getting campaign cash, it creates a situation where some candidates will find themselves beholden to a very small group of donors who expect that a multi-million dollar investment entitles them to an outsized influence on policy decisions or at least on controlling the narrative, and it prevents voters from knowing who these donors are. Nothing in the Post article, and nothing about the election, suggests these are not real problems.

  13. #13 |  advocatethis | 

    If you shoot your partner while trying to shoot my dog as you try to serve a warrant on me, do I get charged with attempted murder?

  14. #14 |  David | 

    The perfect storm would be an officer shooting his partner during a wrong-door raid; the homeowner is charged with resisting arrest and, thus, felony murder of a police officer.

  15. #15 |  Burgers Allday | 

    http://www.policeone.com/investigations/articles/6031802-Colo-police-say-friendly-fire-may-have-killed-cop/

  16. #16 |  Burgers Allday | 

    My guess is that the policeman in the Memphis case wasn’t actually trying to shoot the dog, but that that sounded better than: mistook fellow officer for an occupant.

    On this theme, Officer Bryant was shot in the back with a SHOTGUN.

    Maybe some of the gun-nut totski’s can let me know how plausible it is to aim a shotgun at a dog and then have the “shotgun bullet” (or whatever you call it) accidentally go into somebody’s back.

  17. #17 |  jesse | 

    The author of the NYT article has blinders firmly on. Perhaps it could be argued that regular commercial interests like fruit companies are no longer influencing foreign policy. However, now it’s simply the companies manufacturing the weapons that argue for more war. Raytheon, Boeing, McDonnel-Douglass, and Lockheed aren’t likely to find a war they don’t like.

    The argument that Iraq was not about oil is similarly ludicrious.

    To anyone that says it wasn’t about oil, I ask this one question: If the principal export of Iraq were, say, bananas, would any of this have happened?

  18. #18 |  Jack Dempsey | 

    Cop on cop violence warms my heart. I wish there was more of it.

  19. #19 |  Yizmo Gizmo | 

    Is there any way to increase the odds of this happening?
    Just wondering.

  20. #20 |  Yizmo Gizmo | 

    “this”=Cop tries to kill dog during drug raid, shoots fellow cop instead.

  21. #21 |  Joseph Stromberg | 

    At least it explains which constitution John Yoo has been reading. All this time I assumed it was the *South* Korean document.

  22. #22 |  marco73 | 

    The Miami cops need to send out a picture of Mr. Miller to all their officers, and just state “Any interaction with this man will have you sitting uncomfortably in your commander’s office in the morning.”

    And the story about the Tennessee cop shooting another cop while trying to shoot a dog, during a drug raid: it’s pretty common knowledge that shooting the dog is a tactic used to get full cooperation from the people during a raid. Sometimes bad tactics have bad consequences. Maybe they need to rethink the “shoot the dog” tactic?

  23. #23 |  Aresen | 

    jesse | November 9th, 2012 at 1:52 pm

    The argument that Iraq was not about oil is similarly ludicrious.

    To anyone that says it wasn’t about oil, I ask this one question: If the principal export of Iraq were, say, bananas, would any of this have happened?

    I guess we know why Barry bombed Libya, then, don’t we?

  24. #24 |  Chris Mallory | 

    The Carlos Miller ruling does have some dangers to it. It creates a special class of people. “Journalists” do not have any more rights than any other person. The “press” of the First Amendment refers to the means of reproducing information. If a “journalist” had a right to be standing in the area, which it appears they did, then every other peaceful citizen had the exact same right. The police need to back the hell off, but Miller needs to quit trying to claim a special protection just because he is a “journalist” The First Amendment applies to everyone. Every citizen has the right, or no citizens have the right. No special groups.

  25. #25 |  Burgers Allday | 

    I guess we know why Barry bombed Libya, then, don’t we?

    We ain’t politically controlling Libya the way we were Iraq. The answer to your question cuts the opposite way to the way you think it cuts.

  26. #26 |  Aresen | 

    Sorry, BA, but if the Iraq War was to get control of the oil, GWB could have done it simpler by just telling Saddam Hussein “all is forgiven” and making nice, just like they did with Quadaffi.

    Either all wars in the Middle East are about oil, or you have to admit that there are other issues involved.

    Pretending ‘only Team Red starts wars over oil’ doesn’t cut it.

    (Though I think you would agree that both Iraq and Libya should have been left alone.)

  27. #27 |  Fred | 

    Cop shoots another cop while making an “attempt to control the dogs”
    http://www.9news.com/news/article/298640/339/Police-investigate-fatal-shooting-of-Lakewood-PD-officer

  28. #28 |  BamBam | 

    Dollar hegemony is another potential reason to bomb Libya and Iraq. Both country’s dictators publicly announced, and had been doing so, trading oil for gold or currency other than the dollar. This undermines the dollar’s hegemony. Iran has been doing the same for a year.

  29. #29 |  Pi Guy | 

    Blue-on-blue shootings: more please.

    I’m just realizing that maybe there’s a market for pit bull stickers that you can slap on the backs of cops as they enter your home…

  30. #30 |  Rob | 

    Cop tries to kill dog during drug raid, shoots fellow cop instead.

    Schadenfreude. I has it.

    Maybe some of the gun-nut totski’s can let me know how plausible it is to aim a shotgun at a dog and then have the “shotgun bullet” (or whatever you call it) accidentally go into somebody’s back.

    Shotguns used by police officers are usually loaded with 00 buckshot, which in a standard load is comprised of eight to nine approximately .33″ lead balls or “pellets”. Unlike what is often shown in movies, and is mistakenly believed by a large number of people, the pellets do not spread out very quickly; as we discussed in the perjury thread, they tend to spread at about 1-2″ per yard. This means at the average ranges that a shooting would take place inside a house, the pattern formed by the pellets will usually not get much larger than your fist. Basically, this means that the officer holding the shotgun almost certainly had to have it pointed somewhere in the region of the other officer’s back.

  31. #31 |  Cynical in New York | 

    Cop on cop violence is the closest one gets when one hopes for both sides to lose.

  32. #32 |  liberranter | 

    Cop tries to kill dog during drug raid, shoots fellow cop instead.

    Translation: Bad cop creates good cop.

  33. #33 |  Burgers Allday | 

    (Though I think you would agree that both Iraq and Libya should have been left alone.)

    I don’t think the US needs a peacetime military even capable of conquering either nation.

  34. #34 |  Burgers Allday | 

    entry from my blog worth reading:

    http://police4aqi.wordpress.com/2012/11/10/vance-v-rumsfeld-nos-10-1687-10-2442-seventh-circuit-november-7-2012/

  35. #35 |  demize! | 

    Two heartwarmers in one post is a rarity. Its usually all nutshot all day. Carlos and the dog; hows that for a situation comedy title?

  36. #36 |  demize! | 

    #33 agree 100% and now Syria which is being given The Operation Gladio treatment by a cadre of Salifist lunatics and their special forces handlers. May God have mercy on them.

  37. #37 |  demize! | 

    #3 sorry for the hatrick I comment then read. The Iraq war was most certainly not about oil that was a fiction created and maintained by western leftists of the Chomsky ilk who are too uncomfortable to explore the Zionist angle. It was neocon led and directed “aka dual loyalists” really single loyalists ex trotskyite American Likudniks. There is sufficient documentary evidence that Anglo/American petroleum interests directly lobbied the administration to not invade Iraq if you care to research it.

  38. #38 |  Kurtz | 

    #16 & #30 In addition to what Rob said, keep in mind that Federal makes a Law Enforcement buckshot load that’s designed to keep the spread as tight as possible even without the use of a choke. The idea here, or so I’ve been told, is that the pellets stay very close together upon impact, and essentially have a billiards effect where the first pellet on target slows down and is impacted by the pellet in behind it, causing the first pellet to veer off in a different direction within the body. It’s also handy for making sure LEOs aren’t driving lead pellets into bystanders because they decided to be Rambo-Jesus and attempt to make a miracle shot at 400 yards with their 18.5 inch barreled scatterguns.

    This type of ammo is commercially available for civilian purchase, and I have fired it through my pump-action shotgun (590A1). Without a choke, all the pellets landed within a 6 inch circle at 25+/- yards.

    So long story short, I’d say one would have to be the damned Revolver Ocelot of shotguns to make a shot like what occurred here. Even without the aforementioned ammo or a choke in the barrel.

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