Morning Links

Friday, October 26th, 2012
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34 Responses to “Morning Links”

  1. #1 |  MH | 

    Gilberto Valle sounds like he could be Officer of the Year.

  2. #2 |  tarran | 

    John Douglass, the FBI agent who established their behavioral science unit (and conducted the interviews of serial killers that formed the basis of their profiling system) points out that almost all serial killers try to get into law enforcement but are rebuffed due to their inability to function well enough to make the cut.

    The thing is, the need to hurt and dominate has very little impact on a person’s ability to, say, show up on time in neat clothes.

    If a cop is talking about murdering people it’s less likely to be idle chatter than if a non-cop is doing it.

  3. #3 |  Yizmo Gizmo | 

    …. was determined not to be the robbery suspect and was unarmed…He also ignored warnings from police, including one from the officer that he would “blow his head off” if Nida did not show his hands.


    Oh, oh. The cop warned him he would blow his head off.
    That makes it okay. False alarm. How bout them Giants?

  4. #4 |  Jeff | 

    I’m a bit annoyed at the not-voting answers at Reason. Their arguments seem to rest on the presidential election, and I don’t disagree with them. But in my state there are two constitutional amendments on the ballot, one to ban same-sex marriage and one to require a photo ID for voting. It’s worth standing in line for those, even if you leave the rest of the ballot blank. (Actually, if you leave those ballot questions blank, you’re counted as voting no, but you have to turn in a ballot for that to happen.)

  5. #5 |  Bob | 

    John Rivera, president of the Miami-Dade Police Benevolent Association, which is representing two of the three officers, called the firing “harsh and unfair.”

    Really? “Harsh and unfair?” Let’s recap! Cop who has already had 3 accidents blatantly causes a fourth one. Then lies to get out of it.

    Fired? Fuck! The clown should be in jail.

  6. #6 |  Red | 

    I learned a long time ago that no matter how you vote on the ballot initiatives the courts have total power in creating or destroying those laws. The only real vote I have left is in the jury box.

  7. #7 |  Dave Krueger | 

    Ultimately, Miami-Dade prosecutors said they could not prove three Medley cops committed crimes. But the Medley police department has fired Officer Freddy Romero, Sgt. Jorge Perez and Lt. Joseph Olmedo for writing false police reports and other misconduct.

    LMAO! Of course they didn’t commit any crimes, silly! It’s not a crime when a cop does it.

  8. #8 |  Jack Dempsey | 

    Cop plans to kidnap, cook, and eat a woman; cop causes another car accident and arrests the victim; cop kills a dog in its front yard.

    I feel safe.

  9. #9 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    Sparagna found that Gilley (cop) reasonably feared Nida…

    Gilley threatened to blow his head off. I guess Nida being afraid of a cop who says that doesn’t matter.

    RE: Cannibal cop…I hear the Police Union is denouncing his arrest as “harsh and unfair” (I hope I’m kidding).

  10. #10 |  Dave Krueger | 

    Puppycide: Cop shoots Golden Retriever puppy six times. Neighbor witness says the dog was never a threat.

    Sorry, but I’m getting to the point where I just can’t read these anymore. The world is a cruel place and animals get abused, injured, and killed all the time, but cops are different. They do it openly and maliciously because they can. They serve up misery with impunity and laugh in your face because they (and all their fellow officers) know you can’t touch them. And then, for the final insult, they go collect their taxpayer funded paycheck. They are sociopaths. Mean for the sake of being mean.

  11. #11 |  Bergman | 

    Well, as we’ve learned from the district attorney’s office in Los Angeles, someone running away from you poses a deadly threat, therefore shooting them for running is justified. Also, we’ve learned that stating that you will kill someone if he doesn’t obey you justifies the killing.

    I wonder how that DA would react to a non-cop doing the same thing?

    I can’t understand why someone who has sworn an oath to uphold the law, who is entrusted with great authority is always held to a lower standard of obedience to the law than those who have not sworn any oaths or been entrusted with such authority.

  12. #12 |  Burgers Allday | 

    I can’t recall if there was an Adge blog post about this one, but I imagine that some of you Totski‘s have been following this important story re police brutality and framing:

    http://www.pressconnects.com/article/20121017/NEWS01/310170024/Vestal-man-beaten-by-Pa-police-released-from-jail?odyssey=nav|head

  13. #13 |  MacK | 

    The Police Benevolent Association for the cannibal cop, will be holding a fund raiser dinner for him.
    The dinner choices will be:

    1. Fried chicken with a side of mashed potatoes.
    2. Pot roast with a side of green beans.
    3. Linda with a side of Sally.

  14. #14 |  Jeff | 

    “John Douglass, the FBI agent who established their behavioral science unit (and conducted the interviews of serial killers that formed the basis of their profiling system) points out that almost all serial killers try to get into law enforcement but are rebuffed due to their inability to function well enough to make the cut.”

    I don’t know any more details, but I do know that Dennis Rader (BTK Killer) was some kind of criminal justice or law enforcement major in college who ended up as a Compliance Officer in Park City, Kansas (more or less an animal control officer who also wrote citations for such offenses as not maintaining one’s lawn). That certainly supports Douglass’s assertion.

  15. #15 |  Salvo | 

    Look, I get feeling that vote for two bad candidates is unacceptable. I get the feeling that your vote doesn’t matter, so why vote at all?

    My problem with those non-voters stems from the fact that there are more races than the one at the top of the ballot. From the various state initiatives (mentioned above), to the local elections, there are plenty of races where your vote can make a large difference. You want to build your party, get the Libertarians into more power? Start with the down ballot races. Get your party into smaller positions, like school boards, town councils, county commissioners. Start building from there until you can start challenging for state house seats.

    By not voting at all, you forfeit the chance to make a difference in the small races, which are often decided by small numbers, and where you can get your preferred candidate in with a little bit of hard work.

  16. #16 |  Juice | 

    #13 – A little bit of Erica as a side… A little bit a Sandra on a bun…

  17. #17 |  Nick T. | 

    Machine Gun Killing.

    The good old “Split Second Decision” Defense. I so remember studying that in law school. It applies to everyone, police or not. It’s as old as the magna – ok I’ll stop. Sick world, ours

  18. #18 |  Balloon Maker | 

    ‘You know, when I see a golden retriever puppy, my first reaction is grab my gun and start shooting’ – what a psychopath would say

  19. #19 |  Marty | 

    Is this puppycide the same story St. Louis, Michigan was mentioned in a little while back?

    the cops falsifying the report over the accident have caused serious harm to this guy- he can’t drive, his property’s damaged, he has a record, he’s out money… it’s mind blowing. Hell, if the 2 cops didn’t help the cop that hit the guy cover it up, the union probably would’ve blackballed them.

  20. #20 |  Helmut O' Hooligan | 

    “The auto wreck was Romero’s fourth in his 18 months as a Medley cop. The crash opened him up to serious discipline. He called Sgt. Perez, who immediately claimed Fraga’s breath smelled of beer.”

    4 wrecks in 18 months! And then he turns right in front of the guy and sarge comes to the scene and just happens to smell beer. Holy shit, that is the most obvious cover-up I have seen in a while. You got a cop who can’t drive worth a shit, so what do you do, just cover up for his mistakes. Wait til he kills somebody. Nice. And the union douche that railed about how unfair it was is just a parody of a police union thug-protector.

    On a positive note, this is all playing out in public. It’s all on tape. Let the public see how their police behave when they hope that no one is looking.

  21. #21 |  Helmut O' Hooligan | 

    Juice #13 – “A little bit of Erica as a side… A little bit a Sandra on a bun…”

    TOO SOON! TOO SOON! LOL! Mambo # 5 if memory serves me. Clever.

  22. #22 |  Personanongrata | 

    Cop who used a submachine gun to kill an unarmed, fleeing man who had committed no crime . . . won’t be charged.

    Using the prosecutor’s twisted logic Michael Nida would have been justified in using deadly force against “Officer” Steve Gilley because Nida reasonably feared Gilley was armed and dangerous (he was).

  23. #23 |  Helmut O' Hooligan | 

    #2 Tarran:
    I’m aware of the fact that a lot of sadistic psychopaths are “police buffs.” Ted Bundy was a prime example. Following Douglas’ theory, I used to think that psychopaths would be unable to abide by the policies and procedures of a law enforcement agency. I thought they would chafe under the rules and regulations. I thought they would be too unreliable and would either not get hired or get fired quickly. The more I see on The Agitator and other sources (mainstream and alternative) the more I think that I may have been wrong. Psychopaths may be quite welcome in policing, politics and the corporate executive suite. Those who lack empathy for others may do quite well in all of these places, even if they come off as a bit strange to others.

    Police agencies continue to emphasize excitement, machismo and, increasingly, outright militarism. At the same time, accountability is virtually non-existent and it seems that other officers are willing to cover-up for almost any kind of deviance presented by other officers. A job as a police officer also gives one wide access to other people’s homes and lives, as well as presumed legitimacy in the eyes of most people.

    Unfortunately, I’ve come to believe that police agencies may be the perfect place for a psychopath to seek employment. What better place for a person who constantly needs excitement, loves to manipulate others, lies like he breathes and doesn’t have a problem with hurting and/or dominating people. In drug war America, this is wholly consistent with policing. And could their be a better job for someone who needs a legitimate sounding excuse to stalk victims and/or enter their homes?

  24. #24 |  Boxy | 

    Puppycide story was a repeat here, although it wasn’t you who posted it.

    http://www.theagitator.com/2012/09/12/dog-not-on-a-leash-in-st-louis-thats-a-puppycide/

  25. #25 |  MacK | 

    #23 Helmut O’ Hooligan, on #2 Tarran you are so right.

    Look at the Dennis Rader (BTK) killer in Kansas, he murdered until he gained the position as the code enforcer.
    With his newly found power in that position he was able to control his murderous intentions by being a bully for the government.

  26. #26 |  AlgerHiss | 

    The website for the city of Medley, Florida:

    http://www.townofmedley.com/index.php

  27. #27 |  Over the River | 

    The “Which presidential candidate are you voting for and why?” story was so sad. I thought once you got to voting age you stopped acting like a child by “offering” to hold your breath until you turn purple. It is as if they don’t want change, they just want to bitch.

  28. #28 |  Kevin | 

    Salvo:

    “By not voting at all, you forfeit the chance to make a difference in the small races, which are often decided by small numbers, and where you can get your preferred candidate in with a little bit of hard work.”

    Over the River:

    “It is as if they don’t want change, they just want to bitch.”

    Both these comments assume that voting is a viable means of “making a difference” or “wanting change”, but the same group you’re complaining about dispute that assumption…

    http://reason.com/archives/2012/10/03/your-vote-doesnt-count

  29. #29 |  Rick H. | 

    #27 Over the River:

    No idea who you mean, or what you are trying to say.

  30. #30 |  Over the River | 

    Kevin:

    Thank you. I do realize that, and their comments point to that, but I don’t think they would be able to start a revolution, nor are they capable of a peaceful means of taking the government into their own hands. That seems to leave voting as the most viable means to change. I would find it difficult to “get behind” someone who looks like they don’t care.

    The linked article “Your Vote Doesn’t Count” just tells me it isn’t the act of voting that is the issue, it is not being informed before voting is a problem. Well I don’t disagree with that, but bitching about it is like crying over spilled milk. They go on about the reasons why you should become more informed, but mix it up with “no one vote was ever the deciding vote”. So what? Tell me that one single part creates a computer, or you can make a DNA strand with a single chromosome.

    Informed consumers, if it be buying a car or picking the next president is critical to a Democracy that has the potential to do the most good. Of course that is where we all differ. The good folks at Reason have a view of what the most good is, Romney has another, and Obama has a third.

    All that being said, and the solutions to the nation’s problems being so great, staying home instead of voting, just implies you have given up and you have stopped trying.

  31. #31 |  Weird Willy | 

    Over the River –

    “I don’t think they would be able to start a revolution, nor are they capable of a peaceful means of taking the government into their own hands. That seems to leave voting as the most viable means to change.”

    It is remarkable how dramatically people’s perceptions can differ. Regardless of whether singular personalities may be capable of starting revolutions or taking the government into their own hands, voting still seems to be a basically useless act to me.

    “[S]taying home instead of voting, just implies you have given up and you have stopped trying.”

    I will more than imply it, I will state outright that I have given up and stopped trying to achieve substantive change through a means proven to be essentially ineffectual.

  32. #32 |  Over the River | 

    But Weird Willy how will change happen. I’ll say up front I will be voting for Obama as his views are more aligned with mine than Romney’s. But when you stay home how does this help elect a candidate whose views are aligned with yours? I realize our selection process is flawed. I realize any candidate I have seen in the last forty years isn’t the best choice, but I want to limit the damage a president can do so I vote for a candidate that I am less fearful of.

  33. #33 |  Bob | 

    #32: Over the River

    But Weird Willy how will change happen. I’ll say up front I will be voting for Obama as his views are more aligned with mine than Romney’s. But when you stay home how does this help elect a candidate whose views are aligned with yours? I realize our selection process is flawed. I realize any candidate I have seen in the last forty years isn’t the best choice, but I want to limit the damage a president can do so I vote for a candidate that I am less fearful of.

    You present a tough question. I likely won’t be voting this election because I don’t think it matters.

    The contest I care most about is a very local one… the local sheriff. I care about this race because it’s the sheriff that sets law enforcement policy in my rural area… And in reality? That decision has already been made in the republican primary. No one else has a prayer in this county. This works for me because I like the current Sheriff, Chris Degase, and he will be reelected no matter what I do simply because of the massive republican stance this county has.

    On the presidential race, that’s a different story. Personally? I think Obama will win. Would I vote for him? Hell no! Logic therefore dictates that I should vote for Romney, right? No. I don’t want him to win either. I think both are sociopaths who are doing this for their own warped view of what’s ‘right’ for the country… meaning they’re doing it for their own personal goals.

    In a twisted way, I almost want Obama to win because I think he will increase the national deficit faster, and thus usher in the inevitable collapse of our financial system faster.

    However, it’s also possible that Romney being elected could do that too… by setting up a Republican power block (so to speak) that applies friction to the FED, causing an increase in interest rates that … wait for it… ushers in the inevitable collapse of our financial system.

    Either way, it’s not a matter of IF the system is boned, but when. Personally, I want it sooner than later. Get it over with so the recovery can start.

  34. #34 |  Kevin | 

    Over the River:

    “The linked article “Your Vote Doesn’t Count” just tells me it isn’t the act of voting that is the issue, it is not being informed before voting is a problem.”

    I think you may need to re-read the piece.

    “That seems to leave voting as the most viable means to change.”

    And the piece argues, compellingly, that your individual vote doesn’t matter in determining the outcome of the election. The outcome is not something you have any meaningful level of control over – you can’t change it even if you do vote.

    “They go on about the reasons why you should become more informed, but mix it up with “no one vote was ever the deciding vote”. So what? Tell me that one single part creates a computer, or you can make a DNA strand with a single chromosome.”

    Arguably, the individual components of either computers or DNA are more important than individual votes in an election. If you, at random, remove a component from your computer there’s a good chance it will stop working entirely. If you remove a single point of information, you stand a plausible chance of causing a disease. If you stay home from voting… nothing happens.

    “Informed consumers, if it be buying a car or picking the next president is critical to a Democracy that has the potential to do the most good.”

    There will never be an informed citizenry because it doesn’t make rational sense for them to be informed. Their votes don’t count, so what’s the point of spending their time on how to make informed votes? That’s why politics is, always has been, and always will be, little more than a giant sporting event.

    “All that being said, and the solutions to the nation’s problems being so great, staying home instead of voting, just implies you have given up and you have stopped trying.”

    Giving up is rational when one has no control over the outcome.

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