Eric Holder in His “Fixer” Role

Monday, September 10th, 2012

Jesse Trentadue, a Salt Lake City attorney, gives a powerful speech about the murder of his brother, Kenneth, at the Oklahoma City federal lockup in the fall of 1995. This is a story of a brutal killing, how federal officials lied throughout the investigation, and how the current U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder orchestrated the cover-up.

In his speech, Trentadue not only tells the story of his dealings with the FBI, or what libertarian writer James Bovard recently called “a Stasi for America,” but also goes into detail about the FBI’s program, PATCON, which involved infiltration of various anti-government groups since the 1990s. One important point he makes is that much of the problem is institutional, not political. The Department of Justice and the FBI and other agencies ultimately protect themselves and operate essentially on their own.

During the 1990s, Eric Holder operated as the “fixer” for Attorney General Janet Reno, and from Ruby Ridge to Waco to the Oklahoma City bombing, Holder made sure that the government suppressed information that would have placed the Clinton administration in a bad light. (Murder tends to make one look bad.) Ultimately, Holder was rewarded by being appointed U.S. Attorney General under Barack Obama, and one only can imagine the crimes that Holder now is concealing.

William Anderson

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21 Responses to “Eric Holder in His “Fixer” Role”

  1. #1 |  albatross | 

    This is consistent with the decision by the Obama administration not to further investigate torture. One widely-speculated-upon reason for this is that the Bush DOJ was in it up to their necks, and thus that prosecuting anyone over the use of torture would involve the defense producing signed memos from the DOJ authorizing everything.

    The powerful in our country aren’t cartoon villains, but I think the best general model to use to understand them is that they’re utterly amoral. That may not be how they behave to their family or friends, but it’s usually how they treat everyone else.

    If someone you don’t know needs to be murdered or imprisoned or tortured or have all his property stolen, in order for you to keep and expand your power, and you aren’t willing to go along with it, then mostly, you don’t continue to climb the ladder toward higher office and greater power. If Holder had resigned in protest when he saw something horrible being done or covered up, he would not be attorney general now–some other person, with more ethical flexibility, would be in his place. There are examples of high up officials who did resign or blow the whistle in these situations. They never get back into those positions–even if they aren’t prosecuted, their careers are typically ended.

    The result is that the powerful people in our society are overwhelmingly not people who have many ethical lines they won’t cross. Because people who do have such lines simply don’t advance up the ladder any further.

  2. #2 |  Mike T | 

    one only can imagine the crimes that Holder now is concealing.

    I guess he got sloppy in his older age with Fast and Furious. Oh wait, that’s right, all of the liberal readers of the Agitator already proved that that was just a big misunderstanding…

  3. #3 |  marie | 

    Horrifying story.

  4. #4 |  Chris C. | 

    The point made by albatross, that bad actors rise to positions of power in a complex, hierarchical organization, is well documented. One of the better explanations of why this happens is in Hayek’s “The Road to Serfdom”. But the version above is succinct and topical. There is NO lesser of two evils. The type of players so describes are all evil, and we don’t belong to their club, so we’re fair game. It’s somewhat like a clan-based society, in which the members of any given clan play nicely with each other, but anyone outside that clan is not considered a “person”.

  5. #5 |  C. S. P. Schofield | 

    And Janet Reno’s back ground is from making her bones in a highly publicized Child Abuse Witch Hunt … and unless I missed something some of the victims (accused) from that case are still in prison in spite of the copious evidence that Reno should be burned at the stake.

  6. #6 |  TomMil | 

    Ruby Ridge was August 1992. Bill Clinton became president in January of 1993.

  7. #7 |  TomMil | 

    That doesn’t mean Holder wasn’t involved in “fixing” the incident in the aftermath.

  8. #8 |  el coronado | 

    The Randy Weaver/Ruby Ridge trial get underway in April 1993. (the one where Gerry Spence made the DOJ his bitch) Spinning & neutralizing the grotesque facts that came out in that trial would have been job #1 for the FBI & DOJ, and Clinton’s/Reno’s chief “fixer” Holder.

    Naturally, the government-run media says nothing about this. Naturally, it never came up at his confirmation hearings: might be racist. Naturally, Romney won’t touch it with a 50-ft. pole.

  9. #9 |  Marty | 

    it’s uglier than the conspiracy people say it is.

  10. #10 |  SP | 

    We are becoming more and more like the old East Germany every day. See something, say something = snitch on your neighbors. FBI $1B program to install face recognition cameras. Using SWAT teams to serve routine warrants. Immunity for agents of the state killing innocent civilians. DHS operating outside airports = Obama’s “Other Army” as large as the U.S. Army. The daily shredding of the Constitution. Not the America I grew up in.

  11. #11 |  Red | 

    Holder was actually in charge of watching Timothy McVeigh as well. He apparently lost track of him during the 8 months while he was testing detonators in Arizona. Odd about him testing those detonators. Neighbors kept calling the cops about McVeigh and the cops didn’t seem interested in doing anything about the guy.

  12. #12 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    We are becoming more and more like the old East Germany every day.

    There was less difference between the US and East Germany then people like to admit. Just because you could vacation in another country didn’t mean your government wasn’t a lawless bunch of murderers.

  13. #13 |  celticdragonchick | 

    @Albatross

    This is consistent with the decision by the Obama administration not to further investigate torture. One widely-speculated-upon reason for this is that the Bush DOJ was in it up to their necks, and thus that prosecuting anyone over the use of torture would involve the defense producing signed memos from the DOJ authorizing everything.

    A couple of other problems:

    1. The American public has been very supportive of torturing people with brown skin from other countries who might be terrorists . The jury pool is already poisoned in favor of the defense…and the backlash against the DOJ and the administration would be insane (freedom hating prosecutors instituting shariah law on CIA warriors who protected us!!!!)

    2. The GOP would absolutely retaliate by using the DOJ to go after every democrat possible when they next held the Presidency. They are still pissed off about Watergate, fer Chissakes! Essentially, the GOP would complete the transformation of the DOJ into a political police force and use it to punish every political enemy. We saw evidence of this under Bush (remember Monica Goodling? Using religious tests for hiring DOJ lawyers?) and there would be nothing stopping them from trying to prosecute every member of the Obama administration for anything they coujld make up. It would also pretty much destroy what is left of our Constitution, but that is a secondary consideration when you are most interested in wielding raw power.

  14. #14 |  el coronado | 

    @celticdragonchick –

    Yeah, ’cause the _true_, *unwritten* subtext of that story was secretly about the DOJ’s lust for brown-people torture. Along with the GOP still being pissed off about Watergate, wanting to “compete the transformation of the DOJ” – who hired Reno & Holder again? – and all that. Thank God you & you alone were able to ferret out what that video & speech **really** meant.

    Project much?

  15. #15 |  James Hare | 

    The quality of posts lately on this blog is making it far less readable.

    If you’re going to post to an hour long speech you should at least try to find a transcript. Some of us don’t have an hour to waste watching video.

  16. #16 |  divadab | 

    @James Hare – I think the posts on this thread are quite good. When you don’t agree with a post, I guess that makes it lower “quality” to you, eh?

  17. #17 |  Carl Drega | 

    So James, you seem to be saying that higher quality posts = shorter videos? So the highest quality possible would be a nanosecond long. I disagree.

    I do think the quality is lessened but that’s what makes Radley so good. Remember a lot of the full posts now made would be covered in a roundup post by Radley. I know I visit now weekly, from daily before. I hope to see Radley resume his position soon, but think the substitutes are doing a solid B+.

  18. #18 |  Marty | 

    we just finished watching the video for the second time. it really is stunning stuff…

  19. #19 |  whim | 

    No one would have ever heard of the brutal Federal murder of Kenneth Trentadue if his brother Jesse had not been a licensed attorney, and not had the extreme dedication to pursue this case for SEVENTEEN YEARS.

    What was also obvious from this compelling video is that the Federal Judiciary works hand-in-hand with the Main Justice Department; they are on the same side, and that side is Just-Us, not justice.

    Both are accomplished and efficient cover-up and white-wash artists.

    Finally, the FBI needs a new name: FIB.

  20. #20 |  Militant Libertarian » Eric Holder in His “Fixer” Role | 

    [...] from The Agitator [...]

  21. #21 |  Weird Willy | 

    Marty,

    Who are “the conspiracy people,” and if “it” is as furtively “ugly” as you suggest it is, doesn’t that make you one of them?

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