Alex White, Professional Snitch

Saturday, June 30th, 2012

At the New York Times, Ted Conover has written an amazing profile of Alex White, the longtime Atlanta drug informant who refused to help the cops cover up the murder of Kathryn Johnston. Add it to your long reads folder. It’s well worth your time.

I followed that case closely, so if you were reading this blog back in 2006, you’re probably familiar with the general course of events. But several things about the article struck me. First, for all the danger informants face from the people they give away, White was most afraid of the police officers he dealt with day to day, even before he turned on them after the Johnston raid.

The leader of the team of officers that he worked with most often, Gregg Junnier (pronounced “junior”), apparently set the tone. White said suspects would sometimes make the mistake of talking trash once handcuffed. Junnier would then slam them against a car or grab them on both sides of the mouth, supposedly to keep them from swallowing drugs. White remembers the time another officer he worked with had a suspect handcuffed and on his stomach; when the suspect began insulting him, White said, the policeman “kicked him in the mouth,” which made even his fellow officers flinch.

“One day Junnier come into my apartment,” White told me, “started throwing stuff around. He say, ‘Where’s the money?’ He knew I’d made some that week. He going through my dresser. He took $4,000. Junnier rough. He very, very rough.” White just accepted the situation. He was not a partner but merely a sub rosa subcontractor, a fact Junnier frequently reminded him of.

Junnier’s team drove around in a black Ford van with darkened windows that became notorious — Darth Vader’s own ride. “Everybody know that van,” White told me. Junnier also drove his own S.U.V., and one day he handed White, in the passenger seat, an envelope full of pictures.

“He show me this Jamaican guy,” White said. “Except only his head, on a fence. It had dreadlocks on top and veins below where it got ripped off. Junnier say he fell between buildings during a chase.” White said he felt he was shown the photo as a kind of warning.

Second, we learned from the FBI investigation that the sort of police thuggery apparent in the Johnston case was common and longstanding in Atlanta, which White confirms in describing his own interactions with the city’s narcotics cops. The lying, brutality, and corruption had been going on for years. Yet a local civil rights leader told Conover, and a local police official seemed to confirm, that the Johnston case was the first time a white police officer in Atlanta had ever been charged with violating the rights of a black person.

And there’s a good chance even those officers would never have been charged if not for Alex White. This wasn’t a few rogue cops. This was systemic.

Third, after all this died down, White was convicted of selling “a couple ounces” of marijuana to an undercover police officer in an Atlanta suburb. His sentence? Up to eight years in prison. The police officers who pressured an informant for a tip with threats of false drug charges, lied on a search warrant, gunned down a 93-year-old woman, left her to bleed on her own living room floor while planting drugs in her basement to cover up their mistake, then conspired to cover it all up by pressuring and threatening another informant to lie for them? They were sentenced to 5, 6, and 10 years, respectively.

Finally, Conover points out that one of the reforms the city put in place after the Johnston raid was a civilian review board to provide some police oversight. As of November of last year, less than five years after the raid, here’s how that was working out:

Cris Beamud came from Eugene, Oregon to Atlanta to found and run the Citizen Review Board after city ordnance established the police oversight panel in 2007.

The CRB came into being as a response to a botched drug raid that ended with the police killing of 92-year old Kathryn Johnston.

Beamud tells WABE she’s resigning out of frustration with city and police leaders who often ignore the board’s findings and recommendations.

“We’re constantly being faced with dismissals and rejections of recommendations that we believe, and I believe personally, would improve the quality of public safety services in the City of Atlanta,” she says.

Beamud points to the recent police fondling case, and the ongoing Atlanta Eagle raid. Before an outside investigation found police misconduct during the 2009 raid on the Midtown gay bar, the CRB had issued a report saying the same thing.

“You continue to beat your head against the wall, and then you decide that you’ve had enough,” she says.

Joy Morrissey, who chairs the CRB, says Atlantans are losing a valuable ally.

“Cris has been a police officer, a prosecutor, a police legal adviser, an assistant D.A., and yet [the mayor and police chief] don’t listen to her,” Morrissey says, adding that Beamud has established civilian oversight before coming to Atlanta.

“She produces very good reports – well reasoned reports – and the results have been maligned, ignored, criticized,” Morrissey says.

In fact, almost as soon as the board started work, the police department, with the city’s help, was already trying to neuter it.

The board was able to force the firing of the officers involved in the Atlanta Eagle raid. They were promptly hired by the Clayton County Sheriff’s Department.

 

“Everything changed forever, and everything stayed the same, on the night Miss Johnston died.”

 

Digg it |  reddit |  del.icio.us |  Fark

16 Responses to “Alex White, Professional Snitch”

  1. #1 |  Burgers Allday | 

    Tesler argued, apparently with some success, for a relatively light sentence because he had been in the military and had been trained there to follow orders.

    Not sure whether Junnier and Smith were also military veterans.

    Would love to know.

  2. #2 |  Other Sean | 

    Wow, I can’t believe I just read something that good in the New York Times.

    There was a world of sorrow in that story. After White turned in Johnston’s murders and found himself a target for cops and criminals alike “the F.B.I. responded with a plan to house him outside Atlanta, as a kind of protected witness…but he wouldn’t go for that. The city was all he knew; living anywhere else scared him more than staying put.”

    Reminds me of something I once heard from an old cop. He said: “You ever accidentally take a date to a bar where you couldn’t afford the drinks and you were way under-dressed and everyone looked at you like a clown? Multiply that feeling by ten. That’s what these kids from the projects feel like any time they step into a halfway decent neighborhood.”

  3. #3 |  Breaven | 

    This was posted in the New York Times? Wow. I’m impressed. it’s a little better than their usual diatribe. Good story.

  4. #4 |  celticdragonchick | 

    “He show me this Jamaican guy,” White said. “Except only his head, on a fence. It had dreadlocks on top and veins below where it got ripped off. Junnier say he fell between buildings during a chase.” White said he felt he was shown the photo as a kind of warning.

    What. The. Fuck.

    So the Atlanta PD have been taking professional development classes from members of the Tonton Macoute??

  5. #5 |  Other Sean | 

    Celticdragonchick,

    That was hardly a fair comparison. The Tonton Macoute believed in SOMETHING, even if it was vodoo.

  6. #6 |  celticdragonchick | 

    Other Sean

    Grimly cynical LOL.

    I stand corrected.

  7. #7 |  EBL | 

    I blame Huggy Bear.

  8. #8 |  Chris Mallory | 

    “He show me this Jamaican guy,” White said. “Except only his head, on a fence. It had dreadlocks on top and veins below where it got ripped off. Junnier say he fell between buildings during a chase.” White said he felt he was shown the photo as a kind of warning.

    I imagine it was a fairly common picture from one of the numerous African bush wars. The cop just told a lie or two to make it seem scary.

  9. #9 |  Ariel | 

    Chris M.,

    Good point. You established the cop is a liar and that he uses those lies to intimidate to the point of making others fear for their lives. This guy would really make a Sunday School teacher proud. (Do I really need an emoticon for that last?)

  10. #10 |  Terry H. | 

    “I imagine it was a fairly common picture from one of the numerous African bush wars. The cop just told a lie or two to make it seem scary.”

    Chris, I guess you never visit snopes, because it’s been verified on there since 2003. Jesus, people…google is your friend.

    Doesn’t mean the cop isn’t still a dick though.

  11. #11 |  Steamed McQueen | 

    Been a Shawn Mullins fan for some time… was not aware of this composition.

  12. #12 |  celticdragonchick | 

    Pictures of the decapitation here:

    http://www.snopes.com/photos/gruesome/decapitation.asp

    He fell/jumped off a raised freeway while being chased.

    The fact that this would be used as a threat by an officer is utterly stunning.

  13. #13 |  Bernard | 

    The description of Junnier is almost word for word a character synopsis for Vic Mackie from The Shield.

    He should be suing the makers for royalties.

  14. #14 |  Deoxy | 

    This stuff will stop when public menaces like Junnier are dealt with by the people, since no other force is currently willing to do so. Mob or vigilante justice will eventually set in.

    Of course, to get to that point both requires and exacerbates enormous social damage. Hope things get turned around before that happens, but I’m constantly amazed that it hasn’t gotten that far yet.

  15. #15 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    Is it possible to send a copy of this book to Justice Scalia?

  16. #16 |  Erica Peters | 

    Snopes confirms that Atlanta police CLAIMED the man “climbed over the interstate railing, fell about 35 feet and was decapitated on a wrought-iron fence”

    Anyone looking at the pictures can tell that man’s head didn’t come off in a tragic fall and end up spiked that way. If the angle were different, maybe. Those cops are scary.

Leave a Reply