Sunday Links

Sunday, June 17th, 2012
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42 Responses to “Sunday Links”

  1. #1 |  Helmut O' Hooligan | 

    “The upside is that the citizens of Clayton County get some of the finest-trained, most experienced officers.”

    I think the sheriff meant to say that Clayton County will get some of the finest liars and most experienced rights-violators. This is really just outrageous. Their needs to be a mechanism to “disbar” police officers from further employment as police officers if they break laws or are fired for “conduct unbecoming” type violations. This is actually one of the milder suggestions for law enforcement reform that I have advocated lately, but I am sure the FOP would go still go ape shit at anything that smells like accountability for the POleece.

  2. #2 |  Helmut O' Hooligan | 

    “He saw the dog coming at him full speed, and showing his teeth. He told me he thought he was fixing to bite him,” said Claiborne Sheriff Ken Bailey.

    Or the dog was fixin’ to defend his territory, Sheriff. That’s what dogs do. Or did the detective expect the dog to immediately get submissive. I guess dogs are expected to recognize the police–or die–these days.

  3. #3 |  Jim March | 

    3D printing will change *everything*. Right now it’s mostly a toy but in about 15-25 years or so when they’re able to print in high-grade metal plus other materials, two things will happen around the same time:

    1) Somebody will print everything needed to assemble another one and give it to their buddy. And so on…they go “viral”.

    2) A 12 year old kid in Shanghai or Gods only know where else will download the plans for a 1953-or-so Smith&Wesson 357Magnum and hit “print” – and that’s when the entire concept of “gun control” dies a screaming death *worldwide*. All at once. (Actually, a Sten submachinegun is the most likely type to go first…)

    Yes, that latter *will* happen. Policy makers at that point will have to pick between two different “gun cultures”: the ones involving gangs/criminals or the ones involving lawful self defense and they’re better off starting now. In the US we’ll be in good shape (unless you hold shares in Ruger or the like). In the rest of the world? Whoops…not so much.

    Some places are going to look like a pizza with the toppings ripped off.

  4. #4 |  DoubleU | 

    #3 Jim

    1) I don’t think it will take 15-25 years
    2) You can’t print black powder for the bullets.

  5. #5 |  Onlooker | 

    Contempt of cop goes for dogs too. Unfortunately for them it most likely means a bullet (or hail of bullets) for their failure to bow to power.

  6. #6 |  Jim March | 

    Black powder is easy enough to make. Trust me, if they’re making meth in backyard labs now…

  7. #7 |  omar | 

     Jim March,

    You are correct on both counts, but the process is further along than you state. the reprap project is based around the idea of printers printing printers. Right now, you get some parts like electronics and metal rods, then print the rest. As the project has evolved, the ratio of off the shelf parts to printed parts has gotten much smaller.

    And the thingiverse already has gun parts for download. Guns are some of the most open source industrial objects in the world. while my plastic spitting makerbot can’t print metal barrels, there are handle customizatuons, stocks, magazines, etc that could be made from plastic. Maybe my bot isn’t up to the challenge, but it’s coming very fast.

    There has actually been a spirited debate on thingiverse about the weapon thing. it’s very easy to turn a model of a legal magazine into a model of an illegal magazine. Thingiverse has a policy discouraging weapons but also a no censorship policy. better to have this tech debated by the users than congress.

  8. #8 |  omar | 

    (continued)

    For istance, an AR-15 magazine.

    http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:11636

  9. #9 |  Dave Krueger | 

    Stories about routine dog killings by cops rarely, if ever, report the dog ever having problems with locals or with mail delivery people. So, the dog apparently manages to peacefully coexist with everyone in the community right up until a fuckhead cop wanders onto the scene. The fact that these dogs haven’t had a serious problem with anyone else tells me that cops are killing dogs for sport (ie: “because they can”). It just doesn’t make sense that dogs single out cops as their sole target of aggression (unless, of course, even dogs are becoming aware that cops are the main threat to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness).

  10. #10 |  Stephen | 

    Has there ever been a article where a cop actually got hurt by a dog? Are dogs killing cops nationwide?

    I would love to see Hollywood get involved in this. Can you imagine a chihuahua wiping out a SWAT team the way the white rabbit kills knights in Monty Python?

  11. #11 |  Kazzy | 

    “Their suspect had a hoodie, and Esposito was wearing a suit.”

    Sooooooo… basically, he didn’t fit the description. I wonder what made them stop him in the first place…

  12. #12 |  David | 

    Re: Esposito, anybody surprised none of the cops watch Breaking Bad?

  13. #13 |  Pi Guy | 

    @Jim #3:
    “A 12 year old kid in Shanghai or Gods only know where else will download the plans for a 1953-or-so Smith&Wesson 357Magnum…”
    and
    “Policy makers at that point will have to pick between two different “gun cultures”…”

    Perhaps it would be better to just comply with the Constitution and simply eliminate gun control altogether – no?

    If you can justify centralized, government gun control then you can’t stand against, say, the ObamaCare individual mandate. IOW: nothing nowhere gives Big Gov the power to exert control over either of these.

    More IOW: it’s illegal for the goevernment to do so in the first place.

  14. #14 |  Other Sean | 

    If the cops were fans of Esposito’s work in the early 90s, they might have been looking for an empty M1911 Colt .45

  15. #15 |  Bystander | 

    I think the following blog post is an appropriate recommendation:

    http://randompixels.blogspot.com/2012/06/aventura-swat-to-al-qaeda-bring-it-on.html

    A Florida SWAT team arranged (paid?) for a photographer to take some “glamour shots” of the team members playing soldier. According to the googly-eyed photographer, “these guys do things that would almost make the Navy Seals jealous.” What “things”? It’s probably classified.

  16. #16 |  Len | 

    So Radley, non-related issue here; driving up 270 between Montgomery and Frederick County to Charlestown for a little poker, traffic is shitty tied up, then I see lights flashing and cars pulling over to the side. Wondering why cops aren’t taking shoulder, then this procession gets to me and see I a bunch of bikers being escorted by various LE cruisers. So, I say to myself this isn’t kosher and call Maryland Police to look into it. I don’t know what came of it, but as a Marylander yourself I thought I would bring this to your attention. I’ll probably call again to see if anything was done, but am not counting on it.

    Side note, officious dumb ass in unmarked as I’m already pulled to shoulder says “get off the road”. I respond back “fuck off”. I mean seriously, dumb ass I’m already pulled over, you need to mark your territory or something?

  17. #17 |  Cornellian | 

    “The Atlanta cops who were fired for an illegal and abusive search on a gay nightclub . . . have been hired by the sheriff in nearby Clayton County.”

    An incredibly stupid decision by the sheriff of Clayton County. No cop who has been fired for lying to cover up police misconduct will ever be a credible witness in front of a jury in any future case, which means they’re completely useless to the police force.

  18. #18 |  (B)oscoH, Yogurt Eater | 

    So ThinkProgress is worried that “Do you know who I am” doesn’t trump “stop and frisk”. The metaphor here being that the policy is clearly out of hand and worthy of attention once somebody famous becomes a target. No mention in the article about how many people are stopped and frisked in NYC each year. No mention of it just being routine, random intimidation.

  19. #19 |  (B)oscoH, Yogurt Eater | 

    BTW, I already claimed “Yogurt Eater”. Anyone here want to claim “Seated Urinator”?

  20. #20 |  Kingadingding | 

    #18: There is a search box in the upper right corner of the page. It is easy to use. Try “stop and frisk” as a search term and you will see that this is the latest in a series of posts about the policy.

  21. #21 |  Len | 

    Yogurt Eater? Is that you Michael Westen?

  22. #22 |  Pi Guy | 

    “Anyone here want to claim “Seated Urinator”?”

    Nah. I just pee in the grass.

  23. #23 |  nigmalg | 

    “these guys do things that would almost make the Navy Seals jealous.”

    lol. Douche chills.

  24. #24 |  (B)oscoH, Yogurt Eater | 

    Sorry, I forgot to post the relevant snippet:

    Party speakers cited medical research they said shows men empty their bladders more efficiently while seated. Improved bladder evacuation reduces the risk for prostate problems, according to the party. It also helps men who sit rather than stand achieve a longer and healthier sex life, it said.

    Now, who wants to add “Seated Urinator” to his screen name?

  25. #25 |  Pi Guy | 

    #15 | Bystander re: Aventura SWAT Team pics

    I like the way the blogger characterizes them as “unintentionally funny.” And they are.

  26. #26 |  croaker | 

    @10 If cops want to get rid of the stereotype that they’re a bunch of knuckledraggers with guns looking to get themselves a gungasm, this is not the way to go about doing it.

    @11 Walking While Negro

    @17 Except for your own personal brute squad, which I guess is the point. This is why law enforcement is losing respect.

  27. #27 |  Radley Balko | 

    No mention of it just being routine, random intimidation

    Don’t judge them based on one blog post about one incident. TP has covered this issue plenty.

    You can’t expect a blogger to provide a thorough overview of an issue every time it comes up.

  28. #28 |  perlhaqr | 

    I’m kind of surprised city insurance companies don’t bump premiums when a city or county is stupid enough to hire a cop who caused a huge payout in another locale previously already.

    I mean, it’s like getting into a DUI accident. There’s now a history of expensive problems relating to the person. Surely the liability is now increased?

    ——

    Jim March: I’m just wondering if the tech will get good enough for rifling.

  29. #29 |  demize! | 

    “these guys do things that would almost make the Navy Seals jealous.” ok I dont wanna contradict my policy of not glorifying the military but I’d love to see these guys do some real SEAL/UDT PT. you would hear alot of “DO WE HAVE A PULSE? NO, CLEAR BZZZZZZZBBT!!”

  30. #30 |  Nancy Lebovitz | 

    Shapeways offers 3D printing (and shops for selling it) if you don’t want to own your own printer. They do a variety of plastics (including one which is flexible enough for springs and hinges), ceramics, sterling silver, etc.

    No metal suitable for gun barrels, but you could make some money with jewelry, custom dice, and highly detailed dinosaur skeletons, then buy a gun.

    I’m looking forward with some nervousness to home bio-construction. What does the commentariat think of Build-a-Virus printers?

    Thanks for the picture of the baby anteater. I needed that.

  31. #31 |  Pete | 

    “I’m kind of surprised city insurance companies don’t bump premiums when a city or county is stupid enough to hire a cop who caused a huge payout in another locale previously already”

    Good point #28, but I doubt insurance companies are pricing policies at a level of detail that takes into account individual cops on a particular PD. Probably neither practical or cost effective as a general practice. However, If some concerned citizen tipped off the insurance company about some risky recent hires by a PD, I’ll bet the insurance company would act on that info.

  32. #32 |  Rob | 

    An incredibly stupid decision by the sheriff of Clayton County. No cop who has been fired for lying to cover up police misconduct will ever be a credible witness in front of a jury in any future case, which means they’re completely useless to the police force.

    He’s probably going to use them as enforces. They won’t ever show up in court because they won’t be used for *those* situations, if you catch my drift.

  33. #33 |  supercat | 

    #17 | Cornellian | “No cop who has been fired for lying to cover up police misconduct will ever be a credible witness in front of a jury in any future case, which means they’re completely useless to the police force.”

    Only if the police don’t know a judge who will block any questioning on the subject as “irrelevant and prejudicial”.

  34. #34 |  Gordon Clason | 

    Wow! That cop is lucky! If I ran to the door to fine a man trespassing in my yard pointing a gun at my house, he would be dead now, and I would be legitimately claiming self-defence.

  35. #35 |  marco73 | 

    #33 – Cops can become “Brady Cops”, in that their courtroom perjury is so egregious that their testimony will no longer be valid in a courtroom. You have to lie pretty hard to get on a Brady list. I haven’t followed the Atlanta case, so I’m not sure if those cops made the list.
    If those cops did not have their state certification pulled, and didn’t make a Brady list, then they are legally employable as LEOs in GA. The fact that they are scumbags apparently did not factor into the sheriff’s decision to hire them.

  36. #36 |  Pups the Jew | 

    Please, like Giancarlo Esposito would ever carry the meth himself.

  37. #37 |  Scenes From Militarized America | The Agitator | 

    [...] The town has recorded one murder in twelve years. (Link via Random Pixels, via the commenter “Bystander.”) Digg it |  reddit |  del.icio.us |  [...]

  38. #38 |  Jim Collins | 

    As far as printing gun parts is concerned, Google the term “investment casting”. I’ve done 3D modeling and design for almost 15 years. I place I worked for had a printer that made wax 3D parts. We would dip them in a ceramic slurry and then fire them in a kiln. The wax would evaporate and you would be left with a high quality mold. Put the mold in a box of sand to hold it in place and pour molten steel into it. When it cools, instant parts. With the correct process gun barrels are simple, you can even mold in the rifleing

  39. #39 |  supercat | 

    #35 | marco73 | //Cops can become “Brady Cops”,//

    The problem is that the decision of whether a cop’s testimony should be considered by default unreliable is made by a judge, rather than a jury, and the mindset judges use when deciding whether to block evidence is rather different from that of a jury. To exclude evidence, a judge must generally find that no impartial finder of fact would consider it reliable. By contrast, all a juror would have to do to disregard a witness’ testimony is find that one particular finder of fact (himself) considers it unreliable.

  40. #40 |  varmintito | 

    I haven’t heard the term “Brady Cop” before. Does anybody know how this classification works? To clarify, several possibilities occur to me:

    1. The individual is barred from testifying in his/her official capacity (i.e., as a police officer) as a prosecution witness in a criminal case.

    2. The individual is barred from testifying in his/her official capacity as a witness for either side in a criminal case.

    3. The individual is barred from testifying in his/her official or individual capacity as a prosecution witness in a criminal case,

    4. The individual is barred from testifying in his/her official or individual capacity as a witness for either side in a criminal case.

    5. The individual is barred from testifying in any capacity in any case, criminal or civil.

    I can see the justification for preventing a lying cop from testifying as a prosecution witness (unquestionably in his/her official capacity, and as a preventative for pretextual “individual capacity” testimony).

    The others strike me as violations of due process — if a witness has useful evidence, a criminal defendant or civil litigant is entitled to it, but must take the witness “as is.”

    I think, however, that a better approach is to have the court make a finding on the record that the cop willingly lied, obstructed justice, attempted to railroad an innocent defendant, has no respect for the truth, wouldn’t tell the truth if it presented the slightest inconvenience/conflicted with his world view, etc., and for their to be a rule of evidence deeming any such finding of fact to be relevant and admissible per se.

    In short, go ahead and testify, but you’d better have a shitload of corroboration.

  41. #41 |  Kjell Skaht | 

    I was born and raised and lived my life (49 years) until last year in Clayton County. I watched it go ever more deeply into the toilet and left last Summer for a better climate, in more ways than one, in Florida. I still have family and friends there and look into local matters from time to time out of concern for them.

    People I’d grown up with or otherwise known for years who were with the Sheriff’s office supported Kem Kimbrough and told me good things about him. After the laughingstock Victor Hill made of the county I was more than ready to vote for someone like Kimbrough.

    For a while there he lived up to his billing, and then the wheels started coming off, and now this. Just…damn.

    I’m glad I left when I did. Now if I could just get my parents to leave.

  42. #42 |  Travis Knight | 

    I’ve read the 8th link.. I feel very sorry for the dog who has been shot by a deputy.. And the fact that the deputy didn’t even feel sorry makes the matter worse.. I hope people will learn to love animals and avoid animal abuse..

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