Saturday Afternoon Links

Saturday, June 9th, 2012
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67 Responses to “Saturday Afternoon Links”

  1. #1 |  Peter | 

    I think the most unintentionally funny bit of Sally Quinn’s piece is when she laments that all people care about these days is money, unlike the good old days when people could go out multiple times a week for a five course meal with wine pairings and all the most powerful people in Washington. Clearly it was a simpler time.

  2. #2 |  SJE | 

    Radley: there have been a number of glitches with your website over the last week. Dunno if its just me.

  3. #3 |  SJE | 

    I love the “Fulton man dies after scuffle with troopers.” Its full of passive voice that makes it like the police were in another story from the one about the man who was killed.

    Then there is the Baltimore story. Middle-aged architect on way home from Bible study has a diabetic attack and 52 cops arrive to beat him to death. Way to keep the streets safe!

  4. #4 |  EH | 

    The passive voice is demanded by the police union. In Berkeley, using active voice is an offense that can get you a visit by the cops at 1:30am on publishing day.

  5. #5 |  Yizmo Gizmo | 

    Palm Beach, Fullerton, Fulton, etc.
    This trend of “peace officers” beating people to death is geting a little ridiculous.
    Can’t the media just start calling them the Insane Badge Posse so people know to flat out avoid them?

  6. #6 |  Eric | 

    That state sandwich project is just wonderful. I would love a 50-page book that is just deconstructed sandwiches. I bet Pittsburghers are cheesed off (no pun intended) that the Primanti Brothers didn’t earn Pennsylvania’s spot. It’s an underappreciated sandwich.

  7. #7 |  Ghost | 

    My daughter is diabetic… NWA was right. F**k da police.

  8. #8 |  Invid | 

    I call shenanigans on that “cheesesteak.” The cheese whiz isn’t melted, it looks like they used steak-ums, and they hit it with ketchup and hot sauce.

    The Pat’s vs Geno’s thing is overrated (Jim’s on south street is better) but that thing in the picture should not be associated with a Philly cheesesteak.

  9. #9 |  marco73 | 

    Too many stories about cops tazing and beating diabetics to death, under the pretense that the person is drunk. What, being drunk is now a capital offense in America? Is there no part of the cops training where they step back and say, hey wait a minute, why is the person not responding to our physical attack?
    Yes, cops have to deal with a whole lot of difficult people, but this one size fits all approach to controlling a suspect is just absurd.

  10. #10 |  W. J. Zeallor | 

    Ugh, yeah, a “diabetic attack”:

    A witness told investigators that Johnson was speeding southbound on Interstate 795 and lost control of his truck, driving off the road near the interchange with the Beltway and colliding with a sign about 9:20 p.m., police said

    A state trooper knocked on the window of the truck as Johnson appeared to be trying to drive off. Damage to the car prevented Johnson from driving off, the trooper said. Police say Johnson, of the 8300 block of Windsor Mill Road, rolled down his window and threatened the trooper, then got out of the truck and began striking him. The trooper used pepper spray on him, Hill said.

    As county officers arrived, police said, Johnson continued fighting, injuring two county officers and the trooper. A county officer, a seven-year veteran assigned to the Franklin precinct, fired the Taser and struck Johnson. Police said it had no effect, and Johnson kept fighting. The Taser was used a second time by a different officer, a 14-year veteran assigned to the traffic resource management team, slowing Johnson enough to be placed in handcuffs.

    Officers soon observed that he he had lapsed into unconsciousness, and medics transported him to Northwest Hospital Center, where he was pronounced dead.

    Hill said Johnson did not appear to be under the influence of drugs or alcohol. An autopsy was scheduled, and police said the investigation was continuing.

  11. #11 |  Rob | 

    I was hoping the rope was being bought to use on politicians. I suppose using it for BDSM is an acceptable alternative.

  12. #12 |  C. S. P. Schofield | 

    I find the ban on feeding the homeless telling. The government is supposed to be in charge of the safety net, and you may not embarrass it by stepping in to do what it apparently can’t!

  13. #13 |  rightshu | 

    That Stately Sandwiches site has assigned the Reuben to New York? New York?! The Reuben sandwich was born in Omaha, Nebraska. We don’t have all that fucking much to be proud of around here, and I refuse to let her arbitrarily assign the Reuben to New York!

  14. #14 |  Other Sean | 

    C.S.P.,

    That’s called Woods’ Law: “To the extent that any private action actually helps the poor according to their own voluntary preference, someone will insist it should be banned to protect the poor.”

    Also expressed as: “The usual leftist approach to helping a poor person is to examine his limited range of choices, and then forcibly REMOVE the choice he actually made.” (e.g., banning payday loans.)

  15. #15 |  DoubleU | 

    It kinda’ seems like maybe there’s something missing from this sentence:

    It is the Underwear Gnome Theory.
    1. Steal Underwear.
    2. ?????
    3. Profit!

    1. Subdue suspect.
    2. ?????
    3. Suspect dies.

  16. #16 |  DoubleU | 

    Sandwiches….
    http://thechive.com/2011/04/14/40-unique-grilled-cheese-sandwich-recipes-just-because-theyre-the-greatest-thing-on-earth-40-photos/

  17. #17 |  C. S. P. Schofield | 

    Other Sean,

    God knows I understand the emotion that leads to Wood’s Law, but I think there’s something else at work here. I think that a case could be made that anything that is, to whatever degree, given over to the State the State will tend to act to make a State monopoly.

  18. #18 |  Pi Guy | 

    I’m in MD and don’t recall the diabetic beaten and tased by police story. I’m assuming all the cops kept their jobs and the $10M is coming out of my taxes.

    I agree. Fuck da Police.

  19. #19 |  Helmut O' Hooligan | 

    “According to the complaint, when State Trooper Davon Parker arrived and tapped on the window, and Johnson managed to lower the window, Parker pepper sprayed him in the face.”

    What the hell? That is how they approached someone who just crashed their vehicle. If accurate, that pretty much shows that they were out for blood from the beginning. So if he didn’t roll down the window would Parker have just pulled a gun and shot him in the face?

  20. #20 |  KBCraig | 

    No one from Texas ever put pickles and onions on a brisket sandwich. It’s meat and bread, possibly with some sauce (a highly debated issue).

    #17 “So if he didn’t roll down the window would Parker have just pulled a gun and shot him in the face?”
    Quite possibly, because he would have been trying to drive away and they feared for their lives.

    As for the rope story, there’s a reason they call that big orange box store “Dom Depot”.

  21. #21 |  omar | 

    for what’s worth, the reason article source says bloomburg outlawed giving food to homeless shelters, not the homeless themselves. go new york, not as bad as vegas!

  22. #22 |  StrangeOne | 

    @ 15 C. S. P.

    That seems to hold true. The government aggressively prosecuted the Pony Express for the high crime of delivering mail (often to places the government refused to).

    That, and I recall my parents trying to get a terribly maintained state road leading to our neighborhood patched up. Neither the state nor the county were responsive to inquiries or requests for the repair, but when we tried to raise the money ourselves they were real quick to throw up excuses as to why we couldn’t get it done. My guess is the contracts they signed for repair would have put them in legal trouble, but they had no motivation to get the contractor to actually fix it. It got repaired about ten years after the neighborhood was willing to pay for it out of pocket, and they did a patchwork job instead of a full repaving so it’ll probably need work again in five years.

  23. #23 |  Ted S. | 

    That piece on Sally Quinn reminded me of this vintage reason piece on Quinn.

  24. #24 |  C. S. P. Schofield | 

    StrangeOne,

    That is one reason I’m instinctively against National Health systems; I know that the State will demand a monopoly, which will mean that if the State gatekeepers won’t approve what you believe you need, you are REALLY SOL. No paying for it yourself. No appealing for charity. No way to get the services you need, other than to break the law and risk being persecuted (word choice deliberate) for trying to obtain something the State has said you have a right to, but won’t provide.

  25. #25 |  StrangeOne | 

    @ C.S.P.

    That’s not unreasonable, we pretty much already have that situation with medication. Just look at Radley’s work on pain treatment to see how the state reacts to what it considers a misuse of supposedly legal drugs.

    At the very least it will be like private schools. In that you have to pay taxes to fund the public option, regardless of how good the service is in your area, and in order to opt out you have to pay additionally to use a private option. Private healthcare would become a luxury only afforded by the wealthy who have to pay for both options, one directly and one through taxes.

    Which is probably why no one in Washington thinks its such a big deal. Since they are, with very few exceptions, all rich.

  26. #26 |  croaker | 

    “Baron” Bloomberg needs to be removed before he decides to exercise Droit du seigneur on female marriage license applicants. But hey, if the cops want to play the “let them eat cake” card, I’m sure a Committee Of Public Safety will be happy to re-test Dr. Guillotine’s Invention on these faux nobles.

    50 Shades: From what I understand, this book is actually a bit tame compared to a large number of books in the “housewife porn” category.

    That story is a diabetic’s worst nightmare. Most police agencies in New York bump a cop’s pay if he’s got an active EMT certification, on the theory that they can tell the difference between a medical emergency and contempt of cop. I take it Maryland does not.

  27. #27 |  Vic Kelley | 

    re: police & the diabetic man

    ” Linda Johnson seeks more than $10 million in punitive damages…”

    It’s not enough. The officers who tortured and murdered this man need to be victims of armed violence at the hands of the community they suppress. Nothing else will stop this. Money, judgments, publicity, court, testimony, etc. won’t bring the victim back or bring you back if you happen to have the misfortune of doing the most dangerous thing an American can do – interacting with police.

  28. #28 |  Difster | 

    I love a busty redhead, the pic at the top of the rope link is perfect.

  29. #29 |  Windy | 

    “There’s a run on rope — and not the camping kind.”
    I gotta say, first thing I thought of when I read that was this:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4XFYMjkFYPg

    (LOVE this Arlo style folk song by Jaime Brockett)

  30. #30 |  Rojo | 

    “The usual leftist approach to helping a poor person is to examine his limited range of choices, and then forcibly REMOVE the choice he actually made.”

    And of course one the very groups the Reason article is talking about is Food not Bombs. A leftist group.

    This is one of the reasons why it’s not particularly very useful to view things in a black & white, the left is this, the right is that, manner. Because when you say “the usual leftist approach,” you’re likely to sound as stupid if I were to say “the usual rightist approach.”

  31. #31 |  Xenocles | 

    “Another trooper arrived and both tried to get Cockrum under control, but he stopped breathing.”

    How unfortunate for Mr. Cockrum! I suppose there was nothing the police could do if he just stopped breathing.

  32. #32 |  Yizmo Gizmo | 

    “Another trooper arrived and both tried to get Cockrum under control, but he stopped breathing.”

    I bet they were pissed! It’s no fun to beat a dead body.
    Just goes to show ya, criminals these days will stop at nothing to defy
    our vigilant troopers…

  33. #33 |  Xenocles | 

    Word has it that the police attempted CPR, but Cockrum defied their effort by staying dead. Faced with this resistance the police had no choice but to resume the beating.*

    *Obvious jest.

  34. #34 |  Mattocracy | 

    Bloomberg is a like the super villain that Ayn Rand and George Orwell would have created through collaboration.

  35. #35 |  perlhaqr | 

    Croaker: “Baron” Bloomberg needs to be removed before he decides to exercise Droit du seigneur on female marriage license applicants.

    Why? They voted for him. I think they deserve him.

    ——

    As for the diabetic story, all I can say is that I’m really glad that when my diabetic friend had a massive low blood sugar and ended up destroying his truck, he ended up on the reservation. The cops there at least know how to deal with diabetics.

  36. #36 |  parse | 

    I don’t see anything in the Bloomberg story that supports the claim that the ban was instituted because the city can’t assess the salt, fat, and fiber content of donated food. The quote from Bloomberg is that donations are not accepted because of “all sorts of safety reasons.” There are certainly valid health issues raised when a shelter accepts donated food; you don’t want to give tainted, spoiled or toxic food to people, even if they are down on their luck. I’d hope the city would find a way to screen food so that it could safely accept leftovers like Glenn Richter was providing. But even though Bloomberg is responsible for some asinine city policies regarding food and health, I’m not willing to accept this story just on the strength of Marcia Kramer’s unsourced report.

  37. #37 |  nigmalg | 

    No way to get the services you need, other than to break the law and risk being persecuted (word choice deliberate) for trying to obtain something the State has said you have a right to, but won’t provide.

    I believe that the only way universal health care can actually “work” is for the state to completely monopolize it. Of course it won’t actually work and it will be a disaster. But if they allow free market to have any grasp, it will displace government alternatives with a cash based bidding system; effectively rendering universal care worthless as doctors will prioritize these patients last or not at all.

  38. #38 |  perlhaqr | 

    Back to the Baltimore diabetes story…

    I just can’t wrap my head around it. I’m an EMT, not a cop, so, obviously a different mindset, but why the fuck would you go up to a recently wrecked vehicle and pepper spray the occupant? I mean, What the Fuck?

    I can’t even imagine what the fuck the cop was thinking. There’s too much of a gulf between asking “Hey, are you ok?” (which I would expect 95% of humanity to do) and fucking pepper spraying the driver for me to even … truly, to even imagine how the hell you go there.

    I mean, even trying to imagine myself drunk on power, I can’t imagine doing that.

    Fuck!

  39. #39 |  r.l.s.3 | 

    I’m not an emotional type, but I got a little choked up when the National Anthem was sung at my kids’ baseball game the other day.

    “O say does that star-spangled banner yet wave, o’er the land of the free”?

    No, not in New York City it doesn’t.

    The major vice in my life, and I’m not proud of it, is a 44 oz Dr. Pepper on a near daily basis. I’m 6’4″ and 190lbs — no where near obese — and I’ll drink my damn soda if I want to.

  40. #40 |  C. S. P. Schofield | 

    Rojo,

    Actually, I don’t think that the law is being used to persecute (word choice deliberate) a ‘leftwing’ group invalidates the observation. The political Left is very delusional about where its own policies lead (not that the Right isn’t too, about different things), and so leftwing groups often fall foul of Statist idiocy …. which they then blame on the Right.

  41. #41 |  Mannie | 

    #22 | C. S. P. Schofield | June 9th, 2012 at 9:45 pm

    That is one reason I’m instinctively against National Health systems; I know that the State will demand a monopoly, which will mean that if the State gatekeepers won’t approve what you believe you need, you are REALLY SOL. No paying for it yourself. No appealing for charity. No way to get the services you need, other than to break the law and risk being persecuted (word choice deliberate) for trying to obtain something the State has said you have a right to, but won’t provide.

    I’m stealing this.

  42. #42 |  Bobby Black | 

    I hope a shitload of cops stop breathing soon.

  43. #43 |  croaker | 

    @36 If I had to hazard a guess, the man having a diabetic emergency took too long to roll down his window to suit the Jack-Booted Gestapo Thug, thus committing the crime known as “Contempt of Cop”.

    We all know what happens when you commit Contempt of Cop…

  44. #44 |  Other Sean | 

    Rojo #28,

    Hey, just because the homeless shelters crippled by this food ban are full of Lefties, doesn’t mean the ban came from anywhere other than the Left. The fact that the Left devours its own ideological parents (and children) is nothing new. That’s been going on at least since the first Menshevik got a bullet in his brain.

    What you’re seeing here is the Nannyist wing of Leftism running a minor purge against the remnants of what you might think of as the Studs Terkel Left – the Left that grew up surrounded by real, absolute poverty and sincerely wanted to do something about it.

    The current Left doesn’t give a shit about poverty – in fact, it hates everything poor people seem to like: Walmart, Hooters, meat, carbs, carbon energy, school vouchers, tobacco (when drawn from anything other than a hookah or cigar), not going to college, etc.

  45. #45 |  Duncan20903 | 

    I’m glad to see that the police are now able to cure diabetes. Medical researchers, eat your heart out!

  46. #46 |  Duncan20903 | 

    r.l.s.3, it’s still a free country as long as you’re willing to break the law.

  47. #47 |  croaker | 

    http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/school_silences_patriotic_song_xdunXcLPbE8S2rAEcZoUiP?utm_medium=rss%26utm_content=Local

    Proud To Be An American = bad

    Baby = good

    This country has gone full retard.

  48. #48 |  Bill Poser | 

    Re the tasered diabetic: I increasingly think that uniformed police (as opposed to detectives) as they exist today should be abolished. Instead, recruit people as EMTs and allow those who are interested, after a certain period of service, to take additional training in law, firearms, etc. and become police officers. That way we could be sure that they knew how to deal with diabetics, drunks and other drug abusers, the mentally ill, and other medical emergencies, and we’d cut down on the number of cops who join for the power trip.

  49. #49 |  croaker | 

    @46 Nice idea, not sure if it would make things any better. There are some real winners in EMS that I’m happy to know will never go into law enforcement.

  50. #50 |  r.l.s.3 | 

    Speaking of EMT’s, most of them go (or come from) the firefighter route. I was recently talking to a firefighter/EMT, and he was explaining that one of the duties of his supervisor is to show up at accident scenes when the cops are getting in the way of helping people, and get them to back off. I got the feeling that a certain amount of animosity exists between the two groups, but I could have misread the moment.

  51. #51 |  Other Sean | 

    Bill #46,

    That kind of happens already, as EMS is something a lot of people do while they’re waiting to get into police academies. It doesn’t yield a better result, really not even a different one.

    The cult of officer safety is a powerful thing, powerfully reinforced at all levels by the threat of social exclusion. A cop can speak out against drug prohibition, he can speak out against racial profiling, he can speak out in favor of the 4th Amendment. Those things would just make him an eccentric to his peers.

    But let him say “I think this officer safety hype has gone too far”, and all his friends will become enemies.

    Against that, background and training mean nothing. I swear you could hire cops straight from the American Diabetes Association, and six months later they’d be right there with the rest screaming at a shock victim: “Stop resisting! He’s aggressive. He’s hopped on something…”

  52. #52 |  markm | 

    “Other Sean | June 10th, 2012 at 12:51 pm

    Rojo #28,

    Hey, just because the homeless shelters crippled by this food ban are full of Lefties, doesn’t mean the ban came from anywhere other than the Left. The fact that the Left devours its own ideological parents (and children) is nothing new. That’s been going on at least since the first Menshevik got a bullet in his brain.”

    Much longer than that – look up Robespierre and Danton.

  53. #53 |  Second St. | 

    I’m all for a ban on feeding the homeless in public.

    Church groups and other do-gooders come my neighborhood so that they can be seen feeding the homeless. This means bologna sandwiches and hot dogs (six or seven times a day at the park across the street from me) and free-floating sytrofoam and plastic everywhere, which is not to mention lack of available toilets. It might also mean listening to hellfire and brimstone all day because some would-be preacher bought a $90 megaphone at Radio Shack.

    I live in a zip code with the highest concentration of social services agencies, which is just fine. These agencies have repeatedly attempted to partner with these groups so that they can serve homeless folks real food, indoors, with clean kitchens, at tables, and where someone might wash their hands and use a toilet. The groups refuse.

    The point of the exercise isn’t the food or feeding the homeless; it’s to be seen feeding the homeless, and more often than not, to proselytize. There’s no dignity in that.

  54. #54 |  Other Sean | 

    Thanks for giving us such a revealing specimen there, Second St:

    “The point of the exercise isn’t the food or feeding the homeless; it’s to be seen feeding the homeless…There’s no dignity in that.”

    Only someone who didn’t care about the homeless, would care about scrutinizing the motives of those who feed them.

    You can’t spread “dignity” on a donated bagel, and it wouldn’t taste any better if you could.

  55. #55 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    I’d like to see the widow (diabetic man’s wife) sue for $500 Billion. First, that still wouldn’t come close to balancing the scales (nothing can bring a person back to life). Second, it would help people understand what a billion is (and maybe fathom what a trillion is). Third, it would completely bankrupt Maryland and force them to start da fuck over (which appears to be the only hope at “reform”).

    However; if we put this case on the watch list, we’ll come back in 5 years and find not much has happened. “Old guy beaten to death by cops while driving home from bible class” seems like the perfect case, but even this doesn’t stand a chance.

    Cops = biggest threat to civilians.

  56. #56 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    Church groups and other do-gooders come my neighborhood so that they can be seen feeding the homeless.

    So? For this you want to make folks go hungry? You might want to check your humanity subscription as it may have expired.

    Remember that when you criminalize something you say you will use violence to enforce it. That means you’ll respond with violence if someone gives a homeless guy a sandwich. It might just be that I’m currently high, but I have to think there’s a better way.

  57. #57 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    @ #24 | C. S. P. Schofield

    I agree. Also, I can easily imagine DNR becoming the decision of the state (and we know how they like to keep you alive–for God’s will or something) complete with a 600 page rule book and decision flow chart. That even means that if you have cancer and choose not to undergo treatment, you could be forced to. Cynical folks might say it’s because those expensive cancer treatments aren’t going to use themselves up…gotta keep sales going and having the state enforce it is pretty easy. Yes, a paranoid scenario. But, I wouldn’t be so paranoid if my paranoid scenarios didn’t keep coming true.

    I don’t mean to offend with my reference to “God’s will”, which is why I didn’t say which God.

  58. #58 |  Jim | 

    ‘Cops = biggest threat to civilians.’

    Cops are civilians too.

  59. #59 |  Second St. | 

    Maybe you should read my whole post: No one in this neighborhood is going hungry for want of a park hot dog. Six or seven groups a day pass them out to an assembled 20 or so people. The residents of the neighborhood — many of whom donate to and volunteer at outreach centers — are left to clean up after such “charity.”

    Two outreach centers adjacent to the park also offer meals. These centers have approached the groups passing out hot dogs and have offered to let them use their clean kitchens where people can wash their hands and sit at a table to eat. They continue to refuse the offer.

    This is about wearing one’s religion and “generosity” on one’s sleeve, nothing more.

    One group of suburbanites came to the park yesterday. Foresaking the ample on-street parking, they drove their cars into the park. I’m very happy the police told them to scram.

    Personally, I’d like to drive on their lawns, extoll the virtues of atheism from a bullhorn, and pass out hot dogs to their neighbors. Something tells me that wouldn’t fly.

  60. #60 |  Helmut O' Hooligan | 

    #51 the other Sean: “That kind of happens already, as EMS is something a lot of people do while they’re waiting to get into police academies. It doesn’t yield a better result, really not even a different one.”

    Yes this does happen, but the opposite also occurs from time to time. I work in the healthcare security field and have, within the last year, completely abandoned any plans of working as a public sector LEO. The opportunities for advancement/specialization in private security are limited if you don’t have a police/military background (or fellate the right manager), so I have decided to pursue EMS. I also know former cops who left policing for the EMS field.

    When I was a police applicant I–perhaps naively in retrospect–sought to help people during some of the most trying times of their lives. Due to what I have learned about policing in the last several years, I feel that I will have a better shot at accomplishing this goal in EMS. EMS is a fairly young field and is evolving. This seems to contrast sharply with law enforcement. The pay is not stellar (unless you are a fire-fighter/paramedic with a public fire department) but I won’t have to violate my principles on a routine basis. I think I am in the process of choosing the better field and that is worth more to me than a higher salary.

  61. #61 |  Other Sean | 

    Second St #59,

    Maybe you’re right. If you really have six or seven groups competing to help 20 homeless people, maybe it is just a preacher’s corner masquerading as a food bank. Lord knows I hate me some preachers, so you have my sympathy there.

    What I do not take back is the general sense of my argument: Motives are a private matter. They are really only important when planning and evaluating one’s own moral choices. They mean very little when judging the actions of others.

    From your first post, it seemed you meant to discount the value of giving just because the giver had an ulterior motive. That’s what prompted my reaction.

  62. #62 |  Other Sean | 

    Helmut #60,

    It’s crazy and tragic that police have such a lock on those security jobs; talk about a case of asymmetrical information between the buyers and sellers in the security market.

    Cops know nothing about protecting people and assets, they just know how to avenge them after a crime has been committed. Even worse: cops utterly suck at cost/benefit analyses, since they’re used to operating from functionally unlimited budgets. Most of what they do is encourage their new employers to overspend on staff and equipment.

    It makes me scream whenever I see some corporation hand over its security to a former police captain. They’d be so much better of with an economist or maybe an insurance adjuster.

    And hey, if I had any assets worth protecting, I’d hire you before some ex-cop.

  63. #63 |  Helmut O' Hooligan | 

    #62 Other Sean:
    Thanks very much for your kind words and for your excellent discussion of protection work vs. policing. The public–and hiring managers–is largely ignorant about the important distinctions between these different fields. This, in addition to rampant badge-licking, is the primary reason that retired cops or even part-time cops get the better security positions. I on the other hand now feel compelled to leave the private protection field even though I have a bachelor’s degree and over ten years of experience. I am most definitely not Paul Blart, but try explaining that to people who think that only the government can really protect them.

    Sadly, the only difference that people, including the police, tend to emphasize is the issue of arrest authority. A number of the dumb ass suspects I have dealt with over the years have given me the same old “you can’t do nuttin” song and dance. This is both simple-minded and incorrect. The proper way to explain this is that a private security officer simply has the same arrest power that any private citizen has. In my case, I just have more experience and training than most people have in this area. But truthfully, police arrest authority (which allows one to detain on “reasonable suspicion” and to enforce court orders) would rarely help me to do my job better.

    Thanks again for the discussion. Even though I’m probably on my way out I still like to talk about this stuff when people are willing to listen.

  64. #64 |  Personanongrata | 

    •Police again mistake a diabetic attack for intoxication. This time, they Tased and beat the man to death.

    How reasonably prudent of the officers as it is officer safety first, beating and tasering the suspect second and covering your ass third.

  65. #65 |  Personanongrata | 

    It’s sad that this article needed to be written. Sadder still, this sentence: Mayor Michael Bloomberg banned food donations to the homeless earlier this year “because the city can’t assess their salt, fat and fiber content.”

    Mike Bloomberg fraction of a human being.

  66. #66 |  Shane | 

    As to a detail or two perhaps missing from the account of another death in custody, see this recent item from The Salt Lake Tribune (note that the two responding were inexplicably placed on paid administrative leave, apparently because an arrestee stopped breathing):

    http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/news/54284041-78/police-death-breathing-custody.html.csp

    Salt Lake City police say they are investigating the death of a man who died while in custody Saturday.

    Officers were called at 3:35 a.m. to the 700 South block of Laconia Court on a report of a man screaming on the roadway.

    Police found a 44-year-old man who began to have breathing problems. An ambulance was called and the man was medically evaluated, according to police. But he subsequently stopped breathing and was pronounced dead at the scene, police said.

    The two officers who responded to the call were placed on administrative leave pending the investigation. The medical examiner’s office will determine the manner and cause of the man’s death.

  67. #67 |  Douglas Willinger | 

    “But now there are so many 25-year-old bloggers, many of them showing up on the TV talk shows, that the old-timers are struggling to catch up”

    Quin does not know what she is writing about- she sound like she deserves a freeway through her overpriced home.

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