Mid-Morning Links

Thursday, May 31st, 2012
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60 Responses to “Mid-Morning Links”

  1. #1 |  Bobby Black | 

    Again. Cops who are afraid of dogs should not be cops. If you are such a fucking coward that a guy reaching for his cell phone needs to be killed, or a dog running around his own damned yard is putting your dumb ass “in fear for your life and the lives of your fellow officers” then you are a chicken shit who needs to be flipping burgers, NOT given a gun.
    GOD I hate cops.

  2. #2 |  Helmut O' Hooligan | 

    “Const. Andrew Vanderburgh was ‘harassed and berated’ by fellow officers because on Nov. 28, 2009, he arrested and charged an off-duty police constable with impaired driving and having a blood-alcohol level over 80 milligrams, according to an internal police disciplinary ruling.”

    A good cop who will, no doubt, be hounded off the force so that the thugs and derelicts can continue to have their fun without interruption. Didn’t he know that it’s ok for police to drive while intoxicated. Those DUI’s are for the little people. And in Canada, no less! Guess moving across the border doesn’t get you away from this shit. You just get single payer so you think everything is hip and progressive ; )

  3. #3 |  Mattocracy | 

    Bloomberg, never seen a freedom that he shouldn’t take away.

  4. #4 |  Helmut O' Hooligan | 

    RE: Fort Worth Puppycide

    “Criado wrote that anytime an officer shoots a firearm, that triggers a review by ‘high ranking officials’.”

    Ooooh. I’ll bet the officer is just quaking in his boots waiting for the discipline that will never come down. High ranking officials. Ooooh.

  5. #5 |  CTD | 

    Pocket Guide to Dog Breeds

    1) A Black dog shot by a cop = Rottweiler

    2) Any other-colored dog shot by cop = pit bull

    Does that clear things up for you rubes?

  6. #6 |  rapscallion | 

    I suspect most puppycides have nothing to do with fear or bad training. They’re just a way to send a message to whoever’s around: “FU, I’m the boss and I can do whatever the F I want.”

  7. #7 |  Powersox | 

    Re #4, Helmut:
    Remember that in cases like this, I think “discipline” is codeword for “high-five from all and nomination for cop-of-the-year”. Which, you know, is already in the works.

  8. #8 |  AJK | 

    The pit bull misidentification comment has been taken out of this version of the article, but is still in this one: http://www.star-telegram.com/2012/05/28/3991156/owners-distraught-by-dogs-shooting.html … though it’s an overheard comment from the owners and perhaps should be taken with a grain of salt.

  9. #9 |  burgers | 

    The culpepper officer said that the encounter put him in more fear than he experienced on the.battlefields of Iraq.

  10. #10 |  AMW | 

    Re: Bloomberg

    NYC will also need to put a new law on the books establishing the crime of “cola structuring,” to prevent the inevitable rise of people simply buying two 16 ounce drinks instead of one 32-ouncer.

  11. #11 |  Jozef | 

    Re: Bloomberg

    I blame the waste disposal lobby. Why else would Bloomberg propose that the amount of waste NYC produces is increased thanks to multiple smaller cups instead of one large one?

  12. #12 |  edmund dantes | 

    “As I noted in another post, we need citizens who understand laws, follow them, and accept the consequences if they inadvertently or purposefully break them. It’s called character. I’ve lived in this country for 53 years and have never been late with my income taxes. Do you think the IRS will grant me an exception if I am a day late??? I have a pretty darn good job and am pretty smart myself. So why can’t I get an exception when I accidentally break laws.

    All she is doing is missing a ceremony, her life will go on. Better to learn the lesson that one needs to prepare better than to learn the lesson that if one is cute and charming they can skate through life making ‘honest’ mistakes.” — John Fox at that article.

    My favorite thing about Mr. High and Mighty “I follow the law” is that he’s not even self aware enough to realize that right now he’s probably breaking several laws where the consequences of his “actions” would probably result in him quivering in the corner whining like a toddler. He’s just had the good fortune to have stayed off the radar.

    Too many people in life mistake luck and good fortune for skill and talent.

  13. #13 |  Steve Verdon | 

    For mistaking it to be a “pit bull”? Yeah because pit bulls attack without any provocation or warning indicators all the time….

    A good cop who will, no doubt, be hounded off the force so that the thugs and derelicts can continue to have their fun without interruption.

    Thus my dictum: There are no good cops. Only bad cops and their enablers.

  14. #14 |  Sean L. | 

    @AMW #8 — That’s an easy one to enforce: require a drivers license swipe for each purchase. Just like Sudafed.

    Oh, shit. Did I just give teh gubment an idea?

  15. #15 |  Aresen | 

    Bloomberg makes one wish for an al-Queda strike on Gracie Mansion.

    The horrifying thing is that people have seriously discussed him as a potential president.

  16. #16 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    Turned himself in to Prince William County authorities. PWC just keeps showing up.

    I am really shocked that an active-duty cop has been charged with murder. Shocked. It’s a long way form earning a conviction, but still good.

    Of course, let’s watch the cop antics. Maybe they’ll pack the courtroom with cops in full uniforms (approved) and explain how he’s such a great guy.

  17. #17 |  Robert | 

    @ #14

    I wouldn’t be suprised if each member of the jury got pulled over on the way home, and given a “safety inspection” or some other veiled warning.

  18. #18 |  Mattocracy | 

    Thread Jack. A friend of mine sent me this link reminding me of an issue I’ve been torn on for a while now.

    http://www.cnn.com/2012/05/29/us/mug-shot-websites/index.html

    Basically, there are publications out there that make your mugshot available for people to find, regardless of actual conviction, time served, or if you were later proved innocent.

    Part of my thinks that banning or restricting this is a 1st Amendment violation. Shouldn’t people be free to gather information? Especially when it comes to holding agents of gov’t accountable?

    But, part of me thinks that this is a violation of the 4th amendment in regards to privacy. If you argue that I shouldn’t have my mugshot available on the internet, does that validate cops and other gov’t agents to use privacy as smoke screens to investigation?

    Thoughts on this, Agitatortots?

  19. #19 |  Patricia Cook. « Whipped Cream Difficulties | 

    […] (Hattip: Commendate Balko.) […]

  20. #20 |  Brandon | 

    #10, you are absolutely right.

  21. #21 |  Cynical in New York | 

    RE: Bloomberg

    After the smoking ban, is anyone really surprised at this point?

    A little off topic but be prepared for the next disease outbreak scare

    http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/lookout/chagas-tropical-disease-really-aids-145745645.html

    Anyone want to place bets on who goes with a full retard reaction first?

    1. Obama, his cronies or some other paranoid politicians using this to expand CDC to encroach our lives even more

    2. Paleocons who will find away to tie this into immigration because of this sentence

    “More than 8 million people have been infected by Chagas, most of them in Latin and Central America. But more than 300,000 live in the United States.”

  22. #22 |  Robert | 

    My reply was actually to #16, Boyd, andf not to Sean. My eyes are getting worse…

  23. #23 |  Quiet Desperation | 

    “Ooooh. I’ll bet the officer is just quaking in his boots waiting for the discipline that will never come down. High ranking officials. Ooooh.”

    LOL! I’m the most sarcastic person I know, so you’re totally my hero for the day.

  24. #24 |  Robert | 

    @ #18 Matt: And if you pay one of them to take down your mug shot, you will find that it’s suddenly appeared on a dozen other websites that look amazingly similar to the first one but have different URLs.

  25. #25 |  Quiet Desperation | 

    “The horrifying thing is that people have seriously discussed him as a potential president.”

    I used to think we needed just one truly horrific high office holder to start waking people up at least to the point where they stop voting for the obvious sociopaths, but 8 years of Bush didn’t even make a dent. So, back in the 20th century I might have actually donated to Bloomberg’s presidential campaign as just the shock treatment the country needed, but not anymore.

    There’s also the problem that the only people on the ballot these days are sociopaths.

  26. #26 |  Sean | 

    “Of course, let’s watch the cop antics. Maybe they’ll pack the courtroom with cops in full uniforms (approved) and explain how he’s such a great guy.”

    And if he’s found guilty maybe the officers will stand and salute him, like the Spokane, Washington cops did when their comrade was convicted for murdering Otto Zehm .

  27. #27 |  Matt | 

    @18

    How about this:

    There is no problem with a private website publishing mugshots, as that is covered under free speech and cannot be challenged. However, we can restrict police from releasing mugshots. The crime reports themselves probably should be released (public trials and all that), but I don’t think releasing the mugshots are necessary.

  28. #28 |  omar | 

    So, back in the 20th century I might have actually donated to Bloomberg’s presidential campaign as just the shock treatment the country needed, but not anymore.

    This reminds me of an anti-war person who once told me “I think we should bring back the draft, so after a generation of everyone being at war, people would be against war.”

    It’s garbage.

  29. #29 |  Yizmo Gizmo | 

    #18 Mugshots
    A big chunk of the Mugshot Extortion racket is created by
    Rob Wiggen, an ex-con from Florida, who realized these photos could be scraped from cops databases and billions could be made…. Unfortunately for me that’s where I got my DUI (FLA) and I paid the guy and his mobster friend “Carlos” $280 to take my photo off of the google top 10 photos for my name. It disappeared from one website, now I see I am back on the new bustedmugshots.com and mugshots.com, for the same stinkin arrest, so basically it’s possible I’ll end up paying extortionists for the rest of my life over a single misdemeanor. Does that sound fair?

  30. #30 |  Debi | 

    Re: Stop & Frisk – I’m reading the book “The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness.” This is a fantastic book that I recommend to anyone who’s interested in racial justice, the “justice” system, the War on Drugs, or incarceration and post-incarceration issues. I knew the system was racist. I didn’t know just how bad it was until I started reading this book.

  31. #31 |  celticdragonchick | 

    Turned himself in to Prince William County authorities. PWC just keeps showing up.

    I was thinking the same thing.

    Also, why are those bastards in Central California who A. Illegally entered a guy’s house B. arrested him without cause and then C. Fucking BROKE HIS NECK AND PERMANENTLY PARALYZED HIM not in a state or federal prison right now???

  32. #32 |  Andrew S. | 

    Cop Math, Indonesian version: From this article http://www.cnn.com/2012/05/29/world/asia/indonesia-britain-drugs/?iref=obnetwork about a British woman facing the death penalty in Indonesia for allegedly attempting to smuggle 4.8 kilos of cocaine

    Under Indonesia’s extremely strict drugs laws, Sandiford could face execution, according to the head of Bali’s Customs and Excise Agency monitoring division, Made Wijaya.

    “The main reason is because narcotics can massively endanger the young and, thus, whoever is caught with drugs should be severely punished. If three people can consume one gram of cocaine, then this operation has potentially saved up to 14,000 lives,” Wijaya told journalists at Monday’s press conference.

    I’m shocked I’ve never heard something similar from American police.

  33. #33 |  derfel cadarn | 

    I guess when the big bad police man got to start obeying the rules like everyone else they get upset and piss their diapers.

  34. #34 |  kant | 

    RE: mugshots

    My first thought. Are mugshots even necessary? And if they are, could they be destroyed post-incarceration? After people have served their time they shouldn’t have a scarlet letter pinned to their chest.

    ———————-

    My second thought was, how is this not a violation of extortion laws? Demanding money to remove you from a website that is effectively defamation seeing as how mugshots are taken upon arrest and not conviction.

    ———————–

    My third thought was, If i had to choose it should be privacy over speech. A police report should still remain public but it doesn’t seem to serve any purpose to release mugshots.

  35. #35 |  AlgerHiss | 

    The city of Culpepper Virginia…their website is:

    http://www.culpeperva.gov/

    The Culpepper Chamber of Commerce:

    http://culpeperchamber.com/

  36. #36 |  AlgerHiss | 

    On the Puppycide story…

    “A sergeant handed Mark Boling a card with a number for the department’s risk management office, in case he wanted to inquire about restitution for the dog they had adopted from the Humane Society.”

    These cops are on a par with those that did Pol Pot’s bidding. My God, these are some really cold, evil human beings.

  37. #37 |  Bad Medicine | 

    So will they also ban diet drinks, or will those be okay? If so, maybe Coke and Pepsi will sell drinks with no sugar designed to have sugar added at the point of sale in the form of packets. Then Bloomberg can outlaw the sale of sugar packets and the NY cops can stop and frisk anyone seen shaking a sugar pack in plain view…

    Oh, and we need to ban the home brewing or mixing of sugary drinks too! Show ID before you can buy that big container of Country Time Lemonade mix, mister!

  38. #38 |  MH | 

    I doubt you could argue publishing a mugshot is defamation. It’s widely known mugshots are taken upon arrest, so there’s no false implication you were convicted.

    The best one could hope for is better guidelines as to the release of mugshots. Yet it seems law enforcement may prefer the release, as a way of shaming criminals. The problem is once the genie is out of the bottle, you can’t put him back — even after serving one’s time, or, for that matter, being acquitted.

  39. #39 |  Dante | 

    RE: Culpepper cop charged with murder

    Please note that the Virginia State Police investigated this incident and they declared the cop did nothing wrong.

    So, either they were lying or incompetant, and they let a possible murderer walk. Remember this the next time the Virginia State Police spew some garbage about “protecting” citizens. Oh, and don’t hold your breath waiting for whoever decided this was “proper procedure” to be held accountable. Any LE agency that will cover up for a murderer with a badge cannot be trusted to police itself. Or anyone else.

    Protect & Serve (Themselves!)

  40. #40 |  SusanK | 

    Re: mugshots
    I have always thought you could successfully sue (or at least threaten suit) for commercial appropriation, meaning if you use my image to make money, I am entitled to a share.

  41. #41 |  kant | 

    @MH

    RE: defamation.

    True but then again the couple of sites that I looked at make no attempt to remove pictures of people who are innocent. And there are quite a few people who assume being arrest means you committed a crime. (it worked when Arpaio had his opponent arrested). Then demanding money to remove the picture suggests their intent is to shame/embarrass people so that they pay to have it removed.

    But perhaps you’re right. Sleezy as this is, it wouldn’t hold water in court.

    —————

    What I meant by deleting mugshots was, taking them for internal identification purposes only. Keep them for private use only. Then once the person served their time (or found not guilty/charges dropped) delete the photo. No press released photos.

    Again, whether that would/could actually work i’m not sure but then again it would require actual professionalism not “new professionalism”

    and again that would never happen because press releases are so much better when you can pin a crime to a face. simply saying “John smith, 32, was arrested for possession of 3 grams of cannabis” isn’t nearly as impressive or useful. Posting a picture of some guy with messy hair and splotchy skin sends a great message that “we’re not arresting nice people. Only undesirables”

  42. #42 |  Bill E. | 

    Regarding the large soda ban. The stupid is strong with this one.

    Bloomberg is an idiot. I assume he used to have half a brain when he was actually running a business, or was that all based on kissing the right butts? Did something fall on his head?

    At any rate, if I ran a restaurant in NYC I’d want to be the first guy to offer “buy two medium sodas, get the second one for half off”.

    I understand that the ban won’t apply to diet sodas. So does that mean that McDonald’s will give me a big cup as long as I swear at the register not to fill it with regular Coke? And if I do, will they have to forcibly restrain me from drinking it to avoid getting fined by the city?

  43. #43 |  Quiet Desperation | 

    “It’s garbage.”

    Yeah, I know. Pretty much said that. Geez. (kicks pebble)

  44. #44 |  omar | 

    Yeah, I know. Pretty much said that. Geez. (kicks pebble)

    Shit! I missed the “used to”. Apologies. (eats pebble).

  45. #45 |  Other Sean | 

    Debi #30,

    That book will set you back years in any serious attempt to understand the war on drugs and the problems of race and criminal justice in America.

    If you must read it…read it carefully and critically. I think you’ll find it falls apart under even a mild dose of scrutiny.

  46. #46 |  Personanongrata | 

    We have rules.

    Rules are made to be broken, especially those rules that are chickenshit in nature so as to allow qubbiling bureaucrats the power to deny Elizabeth Olivas a high school homecoming queen and class salutatorian the ability to return home (she has been in Mexico for six weeks).

    She has lived in the US since age 4 and is now being punished for the “sins” of her parents.

  47. #47 |  Debi | 

    Other Sean – It seems to be well-regarded and the info seems well-supported. It also reflects the studies and news reports that I’ve read over the years, as well as personal observations I’ve made about racial profiling and how suburban white drug crime is largely ignored. You’ll have to be more specific in your criticisms.

  48. #48 |  Discord | 

    Every cop that shoots a dog under questionable circumstances should IMMEDIATELY be put on a 6 month unpaid “Drive Along” with the local branch of the USPS. Apparently the mailman has been NOT shooting family pets for years. Who thought it possible?

  49. #49 |  Personanongrata | 

    Here’s a map illustrating the patterns in New York City’s stop-and-frisk policy.

    Bloomberg out-Bloombergs himself.

    The tyranny of good intentions run amok in NYC.

  50. #50 |  KRF | 

    They have decided to let the girl stcuk in Mexico back in the country now.

  51. #51 |  supercat | 

    #44 | Personanongrata | “Rules are made to be broken…”

    I have observed that a number of agencies have very strong passive-aggressive tendencies, immigration-related ones more so than most. Whenever there’s a clamor for them to do their job, they will go out of their way enforce the laws against the people who would be most worthy of waivers. Then when there’s a public outcry against that, they use that as an argument that the law shouldn’t be enforced against anyone.

    BTW, many agencies also employ passive-aggressive budgeting: assign things that the public doesn’t want cut the *lowest* priority. That way, when there’s a call for budget cuts, the cuts will fall upon things that people don’t want cut. Then, since the public won’t let those things be cut, nothing will get cut.

  52. #52 |  (B)oscoH, Yogurt Eater | 

    As I have lately increased my consumption of yogurt, these kicks in the nuts hurt more and more.

  53. #53 |  CyniCAl | 

    •The Culpepper, Virginia cop who shot and killed Patricia Cook has been charged with murder.

    A sign of the apocalypse for sure. Along with the murder charges filed against the Fullerton, CA police in the Kelly Thomas beating death, this is the only other instance I have read about where an on-duty cop acting in the line of duty has been charged with murder.

    Let’s hope it’s the beginning of a trend.

    And, as always, fuck all cops everywhere.

  54. #54 |  Rich | 

    Esposito: From this day on, the official language of San Marcos will be Swedish. Silence! In addition to that, all citizens will be required to change their underwear every half-hour. Underwear will be worn on the outside so we can check. Furthermore, all children under 16 years old are now… 16 years old!
    Fielding Mellish: What’s the Spanish word for straitjacket?

  55. #55 |  Other Sean | 

    Debi #45,

    Fair enough. If you want a more detailed discussion, check out this thread: http://www.theagitator.com/2012/05/13/watch-them-explode/. It had a pretty good exchange on the “New Jim Crow” thesis.

    The short version is this:

    No one doubts that the drug war and the criminal justice system today hit with a racially disparate impact. But there is no evidence that the disparate impact is anything other than one more in a seemingly endless series of unintended consequences. The burden of proof is on the positive, and anyone claiming that racism is the “real” reason why we have a drug war would have to produce direct evidence of that. No one has.

    Indeed, check out reason.com’s article yesterday on the evolution of Charlie Rangel from drug war hawk to legalization dove. They point out that, 40 years ago, it was considered racist NOT to support the drug war, because the harm of drugs was said to have a disparate impact on minorities and the urban poor.

  56. #56 |  Other Sean | 

    Debi #45 (if you’re out there),

    To put in another way: If I used the same methods as Michelle Alexander, I could very easily write a 300 page book “proving” that society is at war with young men of all colors, because…

    …it’s young men we put prison, it’s young men we send to Iraq and Afghanistan, it’s young men who have to pay the most for car insurance, it’s young men who beat each other up in gladiatorial contests on pay-per-view, it’s young men who have a median net worth that is X% less than elderly widows, it’s young men who so often play the fool on television sitcoms, it’s young men who have their self esteem destroyed by minstrel stereotypes like David Spade and Charlie Sheen, it’s young men who get killed on the street corners, young men who get beat up in the bars, etc.

    Now just look at all those negative consequences. They must be intentional. They must!

    Can you see what’s wrong with that reasoning?

  57. #57 |  Jeff | 

    John Stewart spent seven minutes going after Bloomberg on Thursday’s The
    Daily Show. “Mr. Mayor, without these giant cups, where are homeless people
    going to shit? You’re going to tell them to take two smaller shits?”

  58. #58 |  Debi | 

    Other Sean – I read the thread, and found that I disagree with you there. We seem to be approaching this issue from vastly different perspectives. Thank you for sharing the thread and your perspective with me, though. I’m always interested in considering other points of view.

  59. #59 |  Other Sean | 

    Debi,

    More than that I cannot ask…

  60. #60 |  Seamus | 

    It’s spelled “Culpeper,” not “Culpepper.”

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