Puppycides

Thursday, May 10th, 2012

In Topeka:

Several neighbors in the 1100 block of S.W. Plass Ave. were upset Monday night after a Topeka police officer drew his weapon and shot a dog to death.

“He drew his gun and fired five or six shots,” said neighbor Constantinos Miklas Acton. “He killed that dog dead for no reason.” . . .

A few minutes later, Acton took a break and saw the dog, a German shepherd and border collie mix, galloping playfully toward the officer.

A few seconds later, shots rang out.

“He knew I saw it,” Acton said. “He really got hot under the collar.”

Topeka police Sgt. Jennifer Cross didn’t release the officer’s name Monday night. She did confirm there had been several calls made about a barking dog and another dog possibly loose in the area.

She said the officer tried to make contact with the dog’s owner, and when the dog approached the officer, “he felt in danger.”

“His training is to protect himself,” Cross said.

And in Cheatham County, Tennessee:

A Cheatham County man said deputies gunned down his dog, and then disposed of the body in the most disrespectful way possible.  Now, he wants answers about how it happened.

Brandon Reed said his pit bull, Kojo, disappeared last Tuesday.

“I had a couple dogs show up in my yard, and they were just kinda hanging out, my dog was out, and he was playing with them, and they were laying around and stuff,” he said.  “Evidently, Kojo followed them back to their home.” . . .

“She said she called the police because my dog was there and he was causing some type of trouble, or she felt threatened,” Reed said.

Sheriff John Holder told NewsChannel 5 his deputies shot the dog after arriving on the scene, but said they did so because Kojo was being aggressive.

“My officers saw this dog come toward them, and my officers shot him,” Sheriff Holder said.  “And we’ll take responsibility for shooting the dog, but we would not have shot the dog if he had not shown some kind of aggression.” . . .

“She said, well, when the officers shot the dog, they dragged it into the woods and threw if off the bluff, which is right behind their house,” he said.  “There’s no way I could’ve found it without rappelling.  So I mean, I don’t even know where he is, I didn’t even get to bury him.”

Sheriff Holder insists that his deputies would not go that far.

“We left the dog there with the people who called us, and they said they would destroy the dog, bury the dog, I think is what they said,” said the sheriff.

That never happened, which is why Reed is so upset.

“It was all handled poorly, the whole situation,” he said.  “It’s so disrespectful to Kojo.  And he deserved more.”

NewsChannel 5 spoke to the woman who called 911 on that day.

She did not want to go on camera, but told us the deputies helped them carry Kojo into the woods, and to the top of that 150-foot bluff.

She said they simply placed the body near the edge, though, and somehow, it must have rolled off.

Image courtesy of the @firehat Twitter feed.

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54 Responses to “Puppycides”

  1. #1 |  Stephen | 

    I like the guide at the end.

    What I don’t get is how these cops are so “afraid” of dogs. I’ve been bitten twice in my life by dogs and neither time did I feel my life was threatened. (and they were not little yappy dogs)

    The cop shooting at the dog is a far greater danger to other cops than the dog is.

    If cops keep escalating the war on pets, more cops will end up shooting each other by accident and they will deserve it.

  2. #2 |  Stress N. Strain | 

    Stephen, if cops keep escalating the war on pets, more pet owners will start shooting cops, and they will deserve it.

  3. #3 |  Stress N. Strain | 

    “‘His training is to protect himself,’ Cross said.”

    Says it all, doesn’t it?

  4. #4 |  RBS | 

    I know it’s been mentioned many times before but how on earth to postal workers, plumbers, landscapers and everyone else with a job that requires going onto other peoples property manage to make it through the day?

    #3- Yeah, says pretty much all you need to know about the current training and attitude of law enforcement.

  5. #5 |  perlhaqr | 

    somehow, it must have rolled off.

    Somehow. All by it’s own, dead self. That’s pretty impressive shit.

  6. #6 |  divadab | 

    When did the police start hiring only Chicken Little and his relatives?

  7. #7 |  EH | 

    I think it’s become apparent that police training to “protect themselves” is wrapped up in their sub-standard firearms training (they get more training in driving) and means one thing: shoot to kill. So it goes for dogs as it does people. Has anybody researched/written about police training curriculums at all?

  8. #8 |  David | 

    There should be some kind of warning before you post such terrifying images.

  9. #9 |  Other Sean | 

    #3 – You are so right, you can’t know how right you are.

    A big part of the police sub-culture since the drug war began, is that cops are encouraged to take a totally non-economic view of officer safety. In a hundred none-too-subtle ways, they are told to treat safety as if it were priceless. Any ordinary notion of weighing costs against benefits goes right out the window. Of course its many times worse in tactical units, where that way of thinking has been raised to the level of a cult.

    The dog shooting is largely a by product of that.

    But it really is a paradox, when you think about it. Cops and soldiers pride themselves on courage; that’s supposed to be how they earn their right to brag and swagger. But today police ideology is the opposite of courage: it takes risk aversion to such an extreme, that (as RBS noted) mail carriers and pizza boys start to look like Clint Eastwood by comparison.

  10. #10 |  Whim | 

    Daily there are armies of utility meter readers, UPS and FED-EX deliverymen, postmen, landscapers, yardmen, weed-n-feed caretakers, and florist deliverymen come into both people’s front and back yards everyday. Somehow, they avoid shooting dogs that they encounter.

  11. #11 |  Aresen | 

    If he felt the need to protect himself from a shep/border collie mix with 5 shots, what would he need against a Jack Russell?

    Of course, if he ever visits a house where there are two Bouviers, he’s purina after the first shot.

  12. #12 |  Other Sean | 

    #7 – I’ve done a little work in that area, and I can tell you that one of your premises is mistaken.

    In just about every police academy curriculum I have seen, there was more firearms than driver’s training (even though way more cops die or get hurt in car crashes than from gunfights). In several of the curricula I’ve reviewed, firearms was the single biggest training block as measured by hours.

    But to your point: teaching someone to shoot and teaching someone how to decide when shooting is necessary, those are two different things. I can’t tell from the materials available to me how many of those hours were devoted to judgment.

  13. #13 |  Jncc | 

    galloping playfully toward the officer

    Don’t worry, he was just galloping playfully, not charging.

  14. #14 |  kant | 

    @ #9 other sean

    safety as if it were priceless

    I don’t necessarily agree that this is bad. But as you eluded to, the problem is it’s their safety at the expense of the safety everyone else.

    It seems like standard traing to make sure every officer is so high strung that the resort maximum violence is trained response of any situation. I wonder if these are standard issue police equipment.

  15. #15 |  sigh | 

    This is a combination of training failures and lack of accountability. They’re not trained to deal with dogs in a reasonable manner and no one holds them accountable for simply shooting them whenever they feel like it – so, naturally, they just shoot them whenever they feel like it.

    They’re trained extensively on when to shoot and when not to – it’s simply that some of that training is just plain wrong.

  16. #16 |  David | 

    As far as I can tell, the official priorities for police officers seem to go something like:

    1) Ensure at all costs that no police officer is injured in any way. Lethal force is an acceptable response to a 1% chance that someone will try to punch you.
    2) Arrest somebody for something.
    . . . . .
    27) Protect civilians from harm.

  17. #17 |  Personanongrata | 

    Puppycides

    “I suppose it is tempting, if the only tool you have is a hammer, to treat everything as if it were a nail.” ~ Abraham Maslow

    And therein lies the crux of the problem, so long as the “professionals” staffing our local home town police departments continue to use the tried and untrue fall back that they feared for their safety every problem they encounter will continue looking like a nail in the need ofa good hammering.

  18. #18 |  Whim | 

    Firing a pistol at a small, moving object like a dog, especially a dog that is hopping around and wagging its tail, increases exponentially the likelihood that a stray round will hit someone in the background. Like a child.

    IF police would just fire the gun into the air, in all likelihood it would scare the crap out of a dog.

    They don’t like the sharp report from a firearm. It hurts their senstitive ears.

    Then, again, they wouldn get the chance to kill something. I suspect its a trend to dehumanize the police in their dealing with the civilians.

  19. #19 |  Other Sean | 

    Kant #14 & David #16,

    You can’t separate this stuff from the futility of the drug war. If cops are sent to go catch some murderer or serial rapist, they can easily see why that is worth a risk to their own safety (perhaps even including a bite from Buffalo Bill’s poodle).

    But if you take those same cops, and spend a few decades sending into the homes of non-violent dope offenders, guess what? They’re not stupid. They’re going to realize – on some level – that what they’re doing isn’t genuinely worth the risk to life and limb.

    Now, they could quit the job and give up on the pension, but those are not easy things to do. Or, they could respond by dehumanizing drug users, and developing a twitchy intolerance for any level of risk. They could decide: “To hell with this. For what I’m doing, no risk is worth taking, even if it happens to be a barking house pet.”

    Unjust wars are uniquely prone to breed atrocities. That’s true whether you’re talking about Vietnam, Iraq, or some local task force doing battle against cold medicine buyers under the codename Operation Gargamel.

    The more these guys sense that what they’re doing does not make sense, and does not make a difference in anyone’ life, the less will they be willing to accept even modest, everyday levels of risk.

  20. #20 |  Phil in Parker | 

    Maybe the USPS can pick up a few extra bucks by giving training seminars to the cops on how to handle yappy dog.

  21. #21 |  kant | 

    @other sean

    While you’re right that the drug war has had a huge impact on the “playing soldier” mentality, I think a bigger influence (although it be could argued the drug war promoted this) is qualified immunity.

    If a cop sees a dog coming towards him/her. They basically have two options; greet the dog and risk getting bitten; OR shoot the dog and that’ll be the end of it. It’s not surprising that they’ll jump to the ‘shoot the dog’ decision.

    Yes, more/better training dog/animal interactions is needed. But so long as there is no risk to shooting the dog, there is little chance that the police will get to the point of interacting with the dog.

    ———————————————————————–

    As a side note, the best thing that could happen to reducing puppycide is forcing police to hang out with the dogs k-9 units. At the vary least it would help police, whom don’t own dogs, be accustom to a dog’s presence. It would help them learn dog body language. And hopefully make them a little sympathetic to doggie life.

    Naive, I know but I can hope right?

  22. #22 |  Tim K | 

    Thank you Radley for the continued coverage of these issues. Sooner or later everyone will realize that there are very few good reasons to call the police. There was a time when the police helped calm a situation, that no longer seems to be the case. Too often now, Police presence escalates situations into dangerous situations (or at the very least results in a negative and disruptive outcome).

  23. #23 |  Sean | 

    It’s pretty disheartening reading the comments so far on the Topeka puppycide, it looks like two-thirds of them have no problem with it. The usual “all that matters is that the officer got to go home safe to his family” type crap.

  24. #24 |  Michelle | 

    The consequence of this ignorance is tragic. If there was a connection between community and police, we would see fewer deaths. Respect is lacking on all sides.

  25. #25 |  Other Sean | 

    Kant #21,

    You’re right about that. There’s nothing like incentives. Even if you just imposed a heavy administrative burden in the form of puppycide-related paperwork, it would probably go a long way. Better would be something like mandatory time spent walking strays for the local humane society.

    In unrelated news, a police union official just popped out from my computer screen and punched me in the face.

  26. #26 |  Dante | 

    I can’t wait for the day when, after shooting someone’s cat, the police use the standard line: The officer’s safety was threatened, so he had to shoot.

    Then, the rest of the world will realize (as we all do here) that the police are the problem, not the solution.

    “His training is to protect himself,” Cross said. See? Even the chief agrees with my interpretation of their motto……

    Protect & Serve (Themselves!)

  27. #27 |  Mark Z. | 

    I’ll bet some cop somewhere read this article, got to the picture, and put seven rounds through his screen.

    Well, six rounds. Nobody’s perfect.

  28. #28 |  Linda | 

    The 5th picture, is that dog “charging”?

  29. #29 |  Aresen | 

    Linda | May 10th, 2012 at 4:25 pm
    The 5th picture, is that dog “charging”?

    Not merely ‘charging’, but ‘charging with its teeth bared and hackles raised’.

    Better empty the whole magazine into that sucker.

  30. #30 |  Steve Verdon | 

    I don’t want to sound like an insensitive jerk, but this is why my dogs never ever get to leave my property without a leash. My backyard is 100% secure with a 5.5′ high cinder block wall and digging under is nearly impossible. They never ever go in the front yard off leash. They never ever go anywhere off leash. Why? Because cops are some of the stupidest gun happy fucks on the planet.

    Really, we would be better off without them.

    What I don’t get is how these cops are so “afraid” of dogs.

    I do, they aren’t afraid, they are gun happy idiots. Pretty simple explanation. They are just dying to use their gun and a dog presents and perfect opportunity.

    I know it’s been mentioned many times before but how on earth to postal workers, plumbers, landscapers and everyone else with a job that requires going onto other peoples property manage to make it through the day?

    Plumbers, landscapers, postal workers, etc. are gun happy shit heads who just can’t wait to shoot their gun in action.

    Think about it, if you love guns, want to shoot them, and look tough what do you? Become a plumber? Postal worker? Meter reader? No. Now a cop is a perfect job for this type.

    A big part of the police sub-culture since the drug war began, is that cops are encouraged to take a totally non-economic view of officer safety. In a hundred none-too-subtle ways, they are told to treat safety as if it were priceless. Any ordinary notion of weighing costs against benefits goes right out the window. Of course its many times worse in tactical units, where that way of thinking has been raised to the level of a cult.

    I disagree because humans are far, far more dangerous than dogs. How many people have dogs killed over the millennia? A Few thousand? Maybe even as many as 10 or 20 thousand? How many humans have died at the hands of other humans? Millions and millions. You pick the big three in terms of authoritarians in the 20th century and you have 50-80 million right there. Humans are the most vicious, cruel, barbaric and violent creatures on the planet. Many enjoying watching other animals fight to the death. So, if it is just a safety issue, shoot people before dogs.

    But that doesn’t happen. Why? Because people would start to get upset about that. So they wont shoot people, but they will shoot the dog. Most people will just say, “Its just a dog, big deal.” So there isn’t much of an issue right from the start with dog shootings. Plus most people still look at cops as public servants doing a good job. So even if they do love dogs and are shocked many will go with the cops story of “oh, the dog was aggressive, okay.”

    No a simple and more parsimonious explanation is: cops are gun loving fuck wits that are looking for an excuse to use their side arm in the line of duty.

    galloping playfully toward the officer

    Don’t worry, he was just galloping playfully, not charging.

    Actually a dog will behave differently when happy vs. when threatened feeling a need to protect its territory. A happy dog will run towards whatever it sees as being fun, be it a person, another dog, or maybe a ball.

    A dog that is feeling threatened or protecting its turf will be stiff and rigged. Hackles will likely be up. The dog wont be barking in a high pitched bark, but something lower and you’ll know the difference. The dog might approach but it is unlikely to be an all out charge. Like many animals a dog does not want to fight, it would be much happier if you just GTFO of its territory. If you continue to advance or somehow provoke the dog it very well might decide that fight is the right response. But if you start to back away (keep facing the dog) and leave its territory the dog will almost surely leave it at that.

    Other things to look for are is the dog panting, is it showing the whites of its eyes, is the tail ridged and stiff above its body which is also stiff looking (aggressive posture) or is it tucked between its hind legs (fearful), is the dog looking to move away from the person? These are all signs you should be very careful around the dog, if possible leave the area.

  31. #31 |  Steve Verdon | 

    Plumbers, landscapers, postal workers, etc. are gun happy shit heads who just can’t wait to shoot their gun in action.

    Should read…

    Plumbers, landscapers, postal workers, etc. are not gun happy shit heads who just can’t wait to shoot their gun in action.

    Typing too fast….

  32. #32 |  Snowdog | 

    So basically, cops are trained that if they see a dog, all they have to do is say “he’s coming right at us” and they can shoot it?

  33. #33 |  Frank Hummel | 

    Steve #30, nice story and explanation of dog behaviour but do you really think cops will read it? That is if you can find one that can read.

    An old joke from my country of birth:
    Why do cops always walk in groups of three? One can read, one can write and the third one is a protecting two vital assets of the department.

  34. #34 |  red | 

    I’m a gun owner and I was armed the last time a dog bit me . I didn’t kill the dog. I told the owner to get the mut out of the area(I was hiking) before it hurt any kids in the area and then went and got my wound cleaned out. I didn’t see a point in shooting the German Shepherd after it stopped attacking me. If you’re around dogs then getting bit every once is a long while comes with the territory. If don’t have enough command to cower a dog with a look and maybe a kick then you probably shouldn’t be a cop. Shooting a dog should be the last resort, not the first.

  35. #35 |  Pete Cofer | 

    “She said they simply placed the body near the edge, though, and somehow, it must have rolled off.”

    Not likely. My theory is that when a cop kills anything, it transforms into a zombie. Karma dictates that there is now a large and quickly growing pack of brain-eating zombie pups looking for a cop snack.

    Regarding the mailmen, meter readers, etc. that numerous people have cited for their ability to do their jobs without killing dogs, let me add that in the pre-internet days (when every household read newspapers) there was a virtual army of 12 to 15 year old kids delivering these papers on bikes to everyone’s front porch every day. And this was well before the days when most local governments began enacting leash laws, etc. I was one of these paperboys, and like the rest, I quickly learned on my own to recognize dog behaviors, and how to avoid getting bitten by aggressive dogs while still performing my job.

  36. #36 |  Frank Stein | 

    Has there been any story about an owner of a dog shot by a cop who ended up shooting the cop? I think we need to be proactive, and set up a fund to help pay the legal defense for dog owners who decide it is necessary to protect society from these psychopaths. Would it be possible to give a conditional donation to the Institute for Justice, that the money has to be used to defend a pet owner who shot/killed a cop who shot/killed their dog?

    Incentives matter, and if what is stopping some wronged owners now is the worry of fighting the justice system, we should try to alleviate that as much as possible. You are not going to get pigs to change their behavior by writing letters or even suing (since taxpayers get the bill). But if the pig realizes his target practice might make him miss his pension-funded retirement at 40, he may think twice (for some broad sense of the word ‘think’).

  37. #37 |  Why are police so much more frail than meter readers? « Drug WarRant | 

    […] because he or she was “threatened.” (See the bottom of Balko’s latest puppycide post for a guide to threatening dog […]

  38. #38 |  Sean | 

    “Has there been any story about an owner of a dog shot by a cop who ended up shooting the cop?”

    Last summer a cop in PA got blown away with a shotgun after a dog owner heard his police chief yelling at him to “shoot the dogs!” . And I’m sure it will happen again, it’s just a matter of time.

    Cops are too pigheaded to understand that they are the ones who are making things so much more dangerous for themselves.

  39. #39 |  Burgers Allday | 

    @36:

    here is the latest on the Hitcho case:

    Jury selection for the trial of George Hitcho Jr., the man accused of fatally shooting Freemansburg police officer Robert Lasso, is set to begin Monday.

    District Attorney John Morganelli, who is trying the case with Assistant District Attorney Michelle Kluk, is seeking the death penalty for the Aug. 11 homicide. The jury could also opt for life in prison if it convicts Hitcho.

    Authorities say Lasso responded to a disturbance call from 126 Washington St., where a neighbor claimed Hitcho threatened him. Lasso then went down an unpaved alley to the back of Hitcho’s home at 440 New St., where two of Hitcho’s dogs attacked him, according to reports. Lasso then called for backup.

    Police Chief George Bruneio has testified that he arrived as Lasso struggled to fend off the dogs. He yelled at Lasso to shoot them with his stun gun, but a shot rang out and Lasso crumpled to the ground, he said. As the dogs ran off, Bruneio said, he saw Hitcho emerge from a lattice door near the house with a shotgun drawn. The weapon was jammed, and Bruneio had to order him several times to drop the weapon, he said.

    It would be nice if some real lawyers would step up to the plate and help this guy. Stun gun my ass. Hitcho also claimed that the police officer pointed a gun at him, which would seem to have reasonably put him in fear of his life. His state-appointed lawyers want to plead insanity. Lazy idiots.

  40. #40 |  Burgers Allday | 

    “He tried to get in my house,” Hitcho said moments after the shooting, according to pretrial testimony.

    “I know my rights. I can defend my rights, my property,” police also allege Hitcho later said. “He was trying to come in my back door.”

    Since his arrest, Hitcho, 46, has undergone medical and psychological testing. Defense attorneys Michael Corriere and Michael Corcoran are expected to present those findings to the jury in an effort to explain Hitcho’s state of mind that day and argue against the death penalty if he is convicted.

    . . .

    Stem said he has many questions about the shooting that he worries may not be resolved at trial. He said Hitcho might be able to answer them, but he doubts the defendant will take the stand in own defense to testify about what happened.

  41. #41 |  marie | 

    “I know my rights. I can defend my rights, my property,”

    To identify themselves, the cops yell, “Police!” That is supposed to be enough for the rest of us to know that they are, indeed, police. But when someone is on/in your property, threatening you or your family, and he looks ready to use a gun…it is difficult for your brain to process the identifiers of a policeman. Your focus goes to what is most important: This is my family/my home and that guy has a gun.

    I have no memory of the ICE agents showing me any identification beyond yelling that they were police. They may have; I have no memory of it because all I could think about was my children. The chaos of the situation made it impossible for me to make sense of what was happening. All I knew was the guy nearly shot my dog, my kids were in the house and I didn’t know who/where/how many these guys were.

    The worst part, as Hitcho learned, is that whatever you do in your panic is something you will be bound to. The cops know what is going on because they have control of the chaos. You don’t. They count on you doing/saying something that will help them. (I’m not saying Hitcho panicked; I don’t know.) At the time, I didn’t feel panicked but now I can see that all I was able to do was to react to the chaos and focus on the most important piece: where are my kids.

  42. #42 |  Sean | 

    ” They never ever go anywhere off leash. Why? Because cops are some of the stupidest gun happy fucks on the planet.”

    Oh, cops aren’t the only ones, I read some gun forums and there are plenty of “civilian” pistol carriers who are just itching for the chance to put a cap in some dog’s ass. Always there are questions like “my neighbor’s dog growled at me the other day, would it have been legal for me to shoot it?” .

    And sometimes there are even ones boasting about their latest “kills.” So just one more reason not let your dog run off-leash, too many fearful “men” with tiny penises running around with guns just itching to draw a bead on something (it seems like those types are just looking for something to live in fear of ; if there isn’t a real threat they will just invent something).

    The only difference between these guys and cops is they don’t have qualified immunity, so they do have to worry about some legalities.

  43. #43 |  Burgers Allday | 

    Hitcho knew it was police. I believe that Lasso had even arrested Hitcho on a previous occasion, years ago. He shot Lasso promarily to save his pet dogs. The legal question is whether he had a right to do this. Staying with the legal analysis, it matters whether Lasso had a right to be where Lasso was with the dogs, somewhere in Hitcho’s backyard. Lasso probably did not have a right to be there. He certainly did not have a right to be there after Hitcho ordered him off the property. The only “exigent circumstances” were those created by the police response. There was no excuse for not having a warrant, and there was no excuse for Lasso to refuse to leave when Hitcho ordered him to do so.

    This is the great libertarian test case that does not seem to be engaging libertarians. This is about preventing destruction of beloved pets by a police officer who is trampling the Constitution.

    This, rather than the Kelly beating, is where the real attention should be.

    see also:

    http://caselaw.lp.findlaw.com/cgi-bin/getcase.pl?court=us&vol=177&invol=529

  44. #44 |  fwb | 

    A cop’s job is to die FOR us. We hire them to face danger and possibly be killed so that we don’t have to deal with it. Today, cops are pussies. They lack honor, integrity, and strength to such a point that they fear EVERYTHING and EVERYONE out there. And justly so. Cops have been assholes for so long that the people don’t like them any more.

  45. #45 |  BamBam | 

    @marie: you’re expected to be superhuman (like cops believe they are when it serves their purposes) and identify and process all data within a microsecond and take the correct actions.

    @steve: walls and leashes won’t protect your dog when cops traipse through your backyard and shoot your dog, as has been documented on here many times. The cops are just doing their job, following policy, and need to go home safe. Your safety is irrelevant.

  46. #46 |  Steve Verdon | 

    @steve: walls and leashes won’t protect your dog when cops traipse through your backyard and shoot your dog, as has been documented on here many times. The cops are just doing their job, following policy, and need to go home safe. Your safety is irrelevant.

    I know, in the end if the cops want to kill my dogs there is nothing I can do about it…well not immediately. It is one reason why I dislike them so. If a cop comes over the wall in my back yard my dogs will respond and likely be shot. Nothing I can do about that.

  47. #47 |  Steve Verdon | 

    Frank,

    No, I don’t think any cops will read it or if they did it would make a damn bit of difference. I’m just a civilian, not an “LEO”, so what I say and think is irrelevant.

  48. #48 |  Bergman | 

    If the citizenry were to interpret police behavior with the same standards police apply when interpreting citizen or dog behavior, then working as a police officer really would become as dangerous as the police like to claim it is.

    Self-defense is self-defense, pure and simple.

  49. #49 |  Romney the Bully » Right Thinking | 

    […] How about the War on Drugs, with its violent no-knock raids, unconstitutional urine tests, and puppycides. How about New York City, which is frisking more black men every year than there are black men in […]

  50. #50 |  Samky | 

    1. If an officer cannot discern the very plain signs that a dangerous dog shows, how can he (or she) be expected to see the signs in a dangerous human being which are not always so clear. A dog that is feeling threatened will be stiff and rigid. A human being can be smiling at your face and fixing to kill you at the same time. A dog that is feeling threatened will be stiff and rigid. His hackles will likely be up. The dog won’t be barking in a high pitched bark, but much lower and deeper and you will know the difference. The dog might approach but it is unlikely to be an all out charge. A dog does not want to fight. If you continue to provoke the dog it may decide that it must fight. But if you start to back away (facing the dog) it will most likely back down. Other signs are panting, showing the whites of its eyes, or is the tail rigid and stiff above its body and legs which are also stiff looking (aggressive posture), or is it tucked between its hind legs (fearful). Is the dog looking to move away from the person? These are all signs if you are smart enough to see them. If you are not, maybe you shouldn’t be a cop.

  51. #51 |  r.l.s.3 | 

    Whim @18 said:

    “IF police would just fire the gun into the air, in all likelihood it would scare the crap out of a dog.

    They don’t like the sharp report from a firearm. It hurts their senstitive ears.”

    This has nothing to do with the topic at hand, but I couldn’t help but respond to this. If you fire a gun in the presence of any well trained Brittany, Pointer, GSP, Vizsla or Labrador, you will have on your hands an overjoyed canine who may well run toward the gunfire.

    My GSP loves the sound of gunfire. I never even had to “gun break” her.

  52. #52 |  Pi Guy | 

    @Steve #47:

    I’m just a civilian, not an “LEO”, so what I say and think is irrelevant.

    I have to believe that this is the most appropriate use of “scare quotes” in the entire history of the world wide interwebs. EVER.*

    I hope you don’t mind if I just outright steal that for future blog comments. I’d be happy to attribute it to you, if you wish.

    *Note the very poor use of SCREAM CAPS.

  53. #53 |  Jared | 

    I generally agree that all this puppycide is too much. However, in the second story I think it is the owner’s fault that the dog died, although the cops should have taken the body and disposed of it properly rather than whatever actually happened. People who own pets should be responsible for keeping the pet away from anyone who doesn’t wish to be approached by the pet unless it is on the pet-owner’s property. If a pet-owner fails in that responsibility he puts his pet’s life at risk.

  54. #54 |  Friday Cultie Bag | Paul's Thing | 

    […] enforcement militarization occurring in small towns across America, to surprisingly frequent police shootings of family pets, to armed shakedowns on rural roads and the confiscation of travelers’ property and money. […]

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