Arrested, Jailed for a Legitimate Pain Script

Tuesday, May 8th, 2012

Doctors prescribed a Texas woman a strong narcotic after she shattered her knee in Haiti.  And then . . .

“They gave me a pretty high, heavy duty narcotic, Norco, as a painkiller going forward and I had used that up. It had been a month and I had called for my refill,” Lenhart said.

The pharmacy called Lenhart to ask her exactly what time she would be in pick up her prescription. She thought it was odd, but told the pharmacy what time she would be there.

Still on crutches and unable to drive, a friend of Lenhart’s, drove her to a CVS Pharmacy in Oak Cliff.

She wasn’t able to pick up her prescription because a police officer arrived to pick her up.

“He was like ‘we need to go outside,’” she said. “I was on crutches and I had a permanent IV line in my arm. I had a big leg brace. I asked him if it was necessary and he said yes and he rather policingly escorted me out the front door and into the back of a waiting patrol car.”

Lenhart was so stunned, she didn’t think to ask the officer questions. The officer explained to her what was going on.

“He said, ‘Well we believe that you have forged your pain pill prescription and we are calling your doctor now. But I’ve worked with this pharmacist a number of times and he’s never made a mistake,” Lenhart said.

The officer then took her the Dallas County jail, where she remained overnight.  After she was released on bond, she was charged with obtaining a controlled substance by fraud, a felony.

“I couldn’t go back to work until HR had received the paperwork that this was a mistake from my attorney,” she said.

Dallas police later dropped the charges after speaking with Lenhart’s doctor.

These idiots couldn’t even bother to call the woman’s doctor before tossing her in a jail cell.

Lenhart’s story has been making its way around the web the past few days, and has been generating the appropriate outrage. But it shouldn’t be all that surprising. This is the perfectly predictable outcome of all this painkiller hysteria of late. It’s bad enough coming from the usual drug warriors. But because there’s a big evil pharmaceutical corporation to play the villain, we now get progressive outlets like ProPublica, and Alternet and Salon spitting out the government’s hype without the least bit of skepticism—or concern for pain patients.

You can’t really blame the pharmacist, here. She risks arrest and criminal prosecution if some overeager prosecutor looking to make a name for himself decides she hasn’t been sufficiently suspicious of her customers. Think about that. The government will now throw you in jail for failing to be suspicious enough of your fellow citizens. (And not just with painkillers — remember this monstrous injustice?)

Don’t blame her employer, either. The DEA recently shut down two CVS stores in Florida because federal drug cops thought the stores should have been turning away more people who came to fill pain medication prescriptions. Not only that, the agencies also attempted to shut down the wholesaler who supplies those stores for not being sufficiently suspicious of them, a move that would have left thousands of patients in several states without access to the medication they need.

The government has created a poisonous, paranoid atmosphere in which every player in the painkiller process from manufacturer to patient has been deputized to police every other player, to the point where anyone who doesn’t continually question the motives and actions of everyone else risks losing his livelihood, or even his freedom.

But Drug Czar Gil Kerlikowske personally assures me that none of this hysteria is affecting patients. People suffering from pain and conscientious doctors have nothing to worry about, Kerlikowski promises. Just trust him on this one.

Yeah, so tell that to Anne Lenhart. Or to the desperate pain patients who have been emailing me since the most recent doctor went down.

You are sorely missed, Siobhan Reynolds.

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59 Responses to “Arrested, Jailed for a Legitimate Pain Script”

  1. #1 |  Dante | 

    It has come to this:

    Our Federal/State/Local governments = The Real Terrorists.

    The greatest threat to We The People, to our children and grandchildren, are the many government employees who, under the broad banner of “protecting and serving” are actually raping and pillaging.

    We have experienced the War on Drugs, War on Terror, War on Poverty, War on Illegal Immigrants, War on Illiteracy (i.e. No Child Left Behind), War on Pain Doctors & Patients, War on Women, etc. When will there be a War on Idiotic/Abusive/Self-Serving Government and it’s employees? It’s the only War that hasn’t been tried yet. It’s also probably the only one that would work to solve America’s problems.

    Protect & Serve (Themselves!)

  2. #2 |  nigmalg | 

    At this point we can only hope they turn the heat up a little too fast and the frog feels it. The fact that this country is headed for disaster isn’t really debatable. We can only work toward educating our neighbors about this until our collective screams overpowers the drug war propaganda.

  3. #3 |  JSL | 

    Eh, CVS deserves blame here.

    http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/2011/jan/05/did_cvs_buy_its_way_out_meth_ind

  4. #4 |  MassHole | 

    I chatted with a guy at a party this weekend that had run for state office years ago as a democrat. One thing led to another and the subject of weed being legal came up. He was all about how it’s so much more potent, blah, blah, blah and just too dangerous. I made the points that: inhaling less smoke is good, so more potent weed is a good thing and it’s physically impossible to OD on weed regardless of the potency. He failed to see the logic of the first point and then didn’t believe me on the second. He then excused himself so he could go outside and smoke a cigarette.

    Most people are just plain ignorant about the facts of drug prohibition and have no interest in learning. As long as it doesn’t directly affect them, or they can spend $5k on a lawyer and get little Johnny’s bust dismissed, they will never get it.

  5. #5 |  MassHole | 

    What kind of a moron cop sees a person on crutches with an IV in their arm and doesn’t give them the benefit of the doubt, at least to the point of double checking before tossing them in jail? Not that is surprises me any more, but jesus h. christ, what a stupid and evil SOB.

  6. #6 |  Len | 

    That’s the shit that got me, beyond the WOD, they didn’t even bother confirming the facts by themselves calling the doctor or checking the scrip number.

  7. #7 |  Radley Balko | 

    Eh, CVS deserves blame here.

    First, you’re assuming the DEA’s version of events is correct. It’s entirely possible that it wasn’t, but CVS found it cheaper to plead and pay the fine.

    Second, even if the story is true, why is it CVS’s responsibility to fight the federal government’s drug war? The whole notion of attaching criminal liability to not sufficiently harassing your customers is appalling. I mean, this quote from the federal prosecutor is astounding:

    “Rather than choosing to over-comply with the law like their competitors did, they knowingly under-complied with the law.”

    So not only do you have to be a deputized agent in the federal government’s drug war, you should go out of your way to over-comply with the government’s demands, or you risk prosecution.

  8. #8 |  Whim | 

    In my own residence State of Confusion, they now require us to show (and have SCANNED) our driver’s license at the pharmacy if we want to buy Rx cough syrup that happens to have a derivative of codeine, like oxycodone.

    That information goes to a state database to be analyzed by law enforcement personnel to see if either we or our Dr. are abusing pain killers through scripts.

    I was prescribed one tiny bottle of Rx cough syrup, yet my name and other confidential informatiion will be presumably housed in a state database….forever. I presume on the off chance that in the next few years I get another Rx for the same or similar medicine.

    Of course, a person can still go to their friendly neighborhood liquor store and buy any amount of liquor to get stoned out of their mind…..but THAT is not allowed.

  9. #9 |  Whim | 

    Here’a another angle. Under just what legal obligation is a doctor required to answer questions over the phone, purportedly from a policeman, who is inquiring whether or not the script that the Doctor wrote for his patient is both a) medically necessary, and b) legal?

    The doctor might be willing to have a three-way conversation between the the pharmacist, the policeman lurking at the pharmacy, and the patient’s doctor.

    Regarding the pharacists role in Ms. Lenhart’s incarceration, I would suggest suing the pharmacy. They are the ones who phoned the police. They are the ones who made a mistake. They are the ones that prompted the police to arrive at a pre-determined time. And, they can pay for the wrongful incarceration of Ms. Lenhart.

  10. #10 |  JPP | 

    That Alternet article is terrible. Why are two left-wing websites jointly publishing an article that functions perfectly well as DEA propaganda?

    It seems like the intended emotional response is “There oughta be a law”, or more law enforcement, but there is not even an attempt at an argument that law enforcement knocking heads is going to make even a dent in the problem it describes.

    Also, don’t read the comment section. Jebus.

    Side note: Mr. Balko, I’m a long-time reader of your blog, and I just want to say thank you for your tireless work on criminal justice and the drug war.

  11. #11 |  Radley Balko | 

    I would suggest suing the pharmacy. They are the ones who phoned the police. They are the ones who made a mistake. They are the ones that prompted the police to arrive at a pre-determined time. And, they can pay for the wrongful incarceration of Ms. Lenhart.

    They’ll also be shut down by the DEA and possibly arrested if some drug cop decides they haven’t been sufficiently suspicious of their customers.

  12. #12 |  DeadLenny | 

    So Norco is a heavy duty drug? Boy, do I feel gypped. I take two 10/325s, split in half, a day for chronic back pain and if they’re giving me a buzz, I’m sure not noticing. (Yeah, I suppose if I ate a whole handful at once they’d work on my head, but I’m past the age where that sort of behavior has any appeal.)

    … But that’s actually why I take the Norco to begin with: any recovering alcoholic (dry sixteen years now, praizzalawd) is leery of ANYTHING that gets you high. I spent one month using Percocet and told my doc, “Ah, let’s try something different. I enjoy these, and that’s a bad bad thing.”

    I can understand some scrutiny: I mean, some jittery dude showing up at Walgreen’s with a prescription for 300 Dilaudid would justifiably raise some eyebrows. But a woman who’s obviously been in a car wreck getting arrested for as boring a drug as Norco? I guess Texas cops really do live the stereotype of being incapable of rubbing two brain cells together.

  13. #13 |  Goober | 

    What a terrible time to be in the pharmacy business. They are stuck between a rock and a hard place. Turn in your customers on a suspicion, or get put out of business and thrown in jail. Then, when your suspicion turns out to be incorrect, your customer sues you and never patronizes your business ever again.

    Holy crap, you want to talk about damned if you do, damned if you don’t.

  14. #14 |  Mattocracy | 

    This is what it will look like when marijuana is legalized and “regulated” as so many people advocate.

  15. #15 |  Goober | 

    BTW, what, exactly, is the harm in some person using pain killers to get high? Is keeping someone from doing so really worth risking this woman’s job, health, and well-being over? What was she given for her pain during the period of time between her accuser’s accusation and the discovery that she was in the right? Tylenol? So she suffered, almost lost her job, and for what? To prevent the possibility that she might get high?

    Holy crap what a load of mis-placed priorites.

  16. #16 |  Schism | 

    Isn’t there a decent case for false arrest? An arrest where no “reasonable” suspicion existed, and no evidence whatsoever of a crime being committed? Isn’t this the same as arresting somebody driving a green Mustang after a bank robbery by somebody driving the same color/model of car, but no evidence whatsoever that the individual you’re arresting had anything to do with the bank?

  17. #17 |  Cyto | 

    #11-12…

    Healthcare costs are out of control anyway. Putting pharmacies out of business will increase efficiency through elimination of duplicative services. In fact, we should just cut to the chase and eliminate all private pharmaceutical sales. That’ll eliminate the risk of someone getting their hands on a decongestant for nefarious purposes and cut costs at the same time! Win-Win baby!

    As a bonus we’ll be able to eliminate all of those pesky and expensive “maintenance” drugs by fiat – just don’t carry them any more! More win for the plan! Heck, eliminating cancer drugs would probably cut healthcare costs by 20-30% right away! It would also help with that pesky Social Security funding problem. I’m just not seeing the downside here….

  18. #18 |  David | 

    #16: You’re forgetting that anybody who interacts with a police officer in any capacity has assaulted an officer, disturbed the peace or resisted arrest. There is always cause to take you to jail, and it will always hold up in court (even if the actual charge does not).

  19. #19 |  perlhaqr | 

    The government has created a poisonous, paranoid atmosphere in which every player in the painkiller process from manufacturer to patient has been deputized to police every other player, to the point where anyone who doesn’t continually question the motives and actions of everyone else risks losing his livelihood, or even his freedom.

    I swear these fuckers thought 1984 was an operations manual.

  20. #20 |  PersonFromPorlock | 

    #11 | Radley Balko | May 8th, 2012 at 3:21 pm

    They’ll also be shut down by the DEA and possibly arrested if some drug cop decides they haven’t been sufficiently suspicious of their customers.

    Wherefore, putting them between a rock and a hard spot can only encourage them to spend large amounts of money to get the law changed.

  21. #21 |  perlhaqr | 

    Whim @#9: Here’a another angle. Under just what legal obligation is a doctor required to answer questions over the phone, purportedly from a policeman, who is inquiring whether or not the script that the Doctor wrote for his patient is both a) medically necessary, and b) legal?

    Sounds like a HIPAA violation to me, though, if my doc talking to the pig kept me from getting arrested I’d probably be disinclined to sue him over it.

    Cyto @#17: Heck, eliminating cancer drugs would probably cut healthcare costs by 20-30% right away!

    There’s actually a nationwide shortage of chemo drugs right now.

  22. #22 |  RobZ | 

    “Second, even if the story is true, why is it CVS’s responsibility to fight the federal government’s drug war? The whole notion of attaching criminal liability to not sufficiently harassing your customers is appalling.”

    Calling the police on someone is not something to be done lightly. Assuming that CVS could have avoided criminal liability merely by not selling the lady the drugs, they acted very badly.

  23. #23 |  Stormy Dragon | 

    You can’t really blame the pharmacist, here. She risks arrest and criminal prosecution if some overeager prosecutor looking to make a name for himself decides she hasn’t been sufficiently suspicious of her customers.

    She’s free to find a new career whenever she likes. Her desire to hang on to a particular job does not justify her participation in police overreach. If so, can all the cops who stand by an do nothing when they witness another cop doing something wrong get a pass too, on the grounds they’re afraid of the repercussions if they don’t go along?

  24. #24 |  kant | 

    They’ll also be shut down by the DEA and possibly arrested if some drug cop decides they haven’t been sufficiently suspicious of their customers.

    Would a lawsuit be such a bad thing? I know this is probably my naivete speaking here but if Lenhart sued on violation of HIPAA and won. Couldn’t the pharmacy turn around and say “we can’t report suspicious individual behavior because that would require us to break the law”

    It might not be applicable to suppliers being required to be suspicious of pharmacies but a least the patients would have some precedent of protection.

  25. #25 |  CyniCAl | 

    “The government has created a poisonous, paranoid atmosphere …”

    Give the people what they want.

    The diagnosis is poison, so of course, more poison is the cure.

  26. #26 |  Ahcuah | 

    And meanwhile, the Governor of Ohio issues an order making it harder to give pain medications IN THE EMERGENCY ROOM.

  27. #27 |  Irving Washington | 

    This is a perfect opportunity for prosecutorial discretion. Radley, Craig Watkins is keenly aware of your coverage of him. You might send him this story.

  28. #28 |  Yank lll | 

    Meanwhile the Quisling scumbag druggist and CVS gets a free ride when he should be tarred and feathered and the store should be picketed and shut down at the least.

    For you youngsters the term QUISLING equates to an “informer, traitor, turncoat, etc.

    Yank lll

  29. #29 |  DoctorT | 

    Physicians and patients at the VA Medical Center in Memphis grew tired of DEA morons harassing them about opiate painkillers such as oxycodone or morphine. The physicians began prescribing methadone for pain relief. Since the primary use of methadone is weaning addicts off heroin, it’s not on the DEA’s current list of drugs it doesn’t believe anyone should receive. The physicians had no data on the use of methadone for pain control, so they had to guess at and frequently adjust dosages. They and their veteran patients still preferred that hassle to the harassment by DEA agents.

  30. #30 |  croaker | 

    HIPPA does not apply to law enforcement. They can demand anything if it relates to an investigation.

  31. #31 |  CB | 

    >You can’t really blame the pharmacist, here. She risks arrest
    >and criminal prosecution if some overeager prosecutor looking
    >to make a name for himself decides she hasn’t been sufficiently
    >suspicious of her customers.

    The pharmacist still aided and abetted the criminals (cops)
    who assaulted the woman and it is rightful to hold the pharmacist
    morally responsible for their actions.

    Is it okay to not blame a soldier for not following orders to commit an
    atrocity, even if the soldier’s own well-being is at stake? What about
    the Nazi S.S. agents and Gestapo?

    In fact, the moral case against the pharmacist is even stronger than the
    case against a soldier who is conscripted. The pharmacist knew about
    this risk of their voluntary profession and should either defend what is
    right or get the fuck out of the industry!

    So sue, sue, sue the pharmacist and
    pharmacy!

  32. #32 |  (B)oscoH, Yogurt Eater | 

    I just gotta say Radley… You trolled the frigging drug czar and got him to respond with unadulterated bullshit. You sir, are a serious yogurt eater, if you know what I mean. Walk with swagger!

  33. #33 |  anon | 

    You guys should all familiarize yourselves with TOR and a little web site called silk road. If conforming with the law just gets you in trouble don’t bother. Buy your drugs illegally through anonymous services with Bit Coins, have them mailed to your house, and never talk to a pharmacist again. Don’t go around asking the doctor for permission to buy your own medicine, and certainly don’t do anything to put your name on a big government list of drug buyers.

    This country is approaching a soviet union economy. Destitute on paper, but with a thriving black market for everyday goods and necessities.

  34. #34 |  jmcross | 

    “…all experience hath shewn that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable…”
    http://www.ushistory.org/declaration/document/

    In FL the politicians, in a frumious OUTRAGE over “pill-mill” insults, imposed new rules for how MDs shall fill out Rx forms. Niceties such as hand written dates in a prescribed format must decorate patients’ official paperwork before other official papers may be exchanged for certain “abused” substances. [AFAIK use of a quill pen and ink pot are optional.]

    I experienced the benefits of this law when my MD wrote an illegal date on a Rx. The pharmacy could not sell me much needed medication until I returned with the proper date format on my papers. I was forced to make a 60 mile roundtrip through horrific spring break traffic just to satisfy the megalomaniacs in Tallahassee. At least I didn’t have to face The Fist of Justice.

    I’m not sure how “May 8, 2012″ protects me from myself any more than “5/8/12″ allows me to indulge in substance abuse. I know I’m not alone here because the pharmacy had a handout citing FL law as to why their customers were being denied service. The clerk seemed as disgusted with it as I was.

    May the control-freaks’ increasingly desperate and irrational attempts to control everything continue to punish the average citizen to the point where our forefathers were in 1776.

    “…a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism…” Op. cit.

    Are we there yet?

  35. #35 |  Kant | 

    HIPPA does not apply to law enforcement. They can demand anything if it relates to an investigation.

    that can’t be correct. i seem to remember the DEA demanding patient lists from mmj dispensaries and bring denied. there’s absolutely no way LE can legally demand medical records sans warrant.

  36. #36 |  Other Sean | 

    I don’t know what it is yet, but there is some profound insight to be had in comparing the Kerlikowski’s piece to the one on Alternet (assuming there are some basic similarities between Huffpo and Alternet readers).

    When the sitting drug czar tried to feed them 1,200 words of slithering Newspeak, the Huffpo readers answered him with 40 comments of absolutely gorgeous skepticism and defiance.

    When Alternet rolled out the old stenograph-to-power with a drug war piece that would have seemed jingoistic even in 1986, most its readers didn’t notice or complain. If anything, many seemed to revel in the article’s truly repulsive tone of status condescension.

    (For anyone who doesn’t speak journalist: Appalachian is a 100% reliable codeword for white trash, which means open season for the reader’s sense of personal superiority.)

  37. #37 |  The Other Dan | 

    I have severe arthritis and a hip replacement surgery is scheduled a few weeks from now. For the interim, I was prescribed a narcotic.

    When my doctor handed me the script, with doses designed to last about two weeks short of the scheduled surgery. It also came with a warning, I didn’t ask for.

    “Spend a few days in pain, and skip a some doses. This is not how I would want to treat this, but you do not want the un-erasable scrutiny that would be created by a more appropriate prescription and the chronic pain patient designation paperwork my office is required by the State to file.”

    In other words, I have to under-medicate and suffer to avoid a State microscope with a focal point beyond a successful treatment and (presumably) the need for the medication.

  38. #38 |  C. S. P. Schofield | 

    I would love to live to hear some politician saying “We’ve been making war on drugs for most of a century and you can still get most anything you might want in any city in the land. I’m doing what anybody with any sense would do about a war that had been going on without success for a hundred years; I’m going to surrender.”

    Of course, I’d be pretty busy putting my affairs in order, because that would certainly mean the world was coming to an end.

  39. #39 |  Classical Values » “Collateral damage.” How the DEA defines your business, your freedom, and your life. | 

    [...] prescription for every controlled substance sold in every pharmacy in the United States, and as Radley Balko explains in his analysis of the case, pharmacists and doctors live in terror of them: These idiots couldn’t even bother to call the [...]

  40. #40 |  Kris | 

    Radley, it ain’t the point of the post but your Alternet link spills over your Salon link; I see only the former.

    Does someone have the link he was intending?

    Thanks in advance.

  41. #41 |  JSL | 

    Radley, its very possible the DEA is lying and I get why cvs would settle but I’m also guessing they then instituted rules to avoid further DEA harrassment and/or promised to work with them (no one ever gets rolled into being an informant ever… :) ). I blame the corrupt government but I can also condemn them for not standing up to that corruption.

  42. #42 |  Bergman | 

    Re: Whim, #9:

    What I find myself wondering, is given that practicing medicine without a license is a crime, at what point does law enforcement denying someone medication become illegal practice of medicine?

  43. #43 |  Duncan20903 | 

    My wife woke up ill this morning. After she convinced me that she’s really very ill by exhibiting actual symptoms I said that I was really worried, and asked her if she wanted me to call a politician in for a medical consultation. But she’s still not sold on the assertion that politicians are better qualified to practice medicine and insisted on seeing an M.D. Women!

    Now I’m going to have to lobby her to at least get a second opinion from a politician. Even if they can’t cure her, they can at least pass a law which would do so. I may have to put my foot down and insist. After all, it’s for her own good.

    But seriously, what about the children? What kind of message does it send the children if she lallygags and acts like a layabout all day without consulting a politician? Doesn’t anyone care about the children?

  44. #44 |  el coronado | 

    As a betting man, I’d guess that when somebody finally goes all Terminator on 5, 10, 20 cops….I’d bet it’s not gonna be a badass gangsta. Nor a hardcore whacko gun-nut Libertarian. It won’t be anybody like that, I predict.

    I think it’ll be either a) somebody who just saw his beloved dog(s) shot by a cop for no other reason than “it’s fun!”…er, I mean, ‘Officer Safety’; or b) a chronic-pain patient who the LEO/DEA mafia has fucked out of his meds one time too many.

    After a story like this, I’m thinking it won’t be too long now. We’ll see.

  45. #45 |  strayan | 

    Drug law enforcement agencies are attempting to conscript as many people as possible into fighting the drug war. Healthcare workers must resist all costs.

  46. #46 |  Duncan20903 | 

    el coronado, you just haven’t been paying attention. There’s already been at least 2 this year. One in Utah for certain, the other within the last couple of weeks, in New Hampshire IIRC. The guy in Utah was a pretty darn good shot, killed 1 critically/seriously injured another 4(?).
    ———- ———- ———- ———- ———-
    “that can’t be correct. i seem to remember the DEA demanding patient lists from mmj dispensaries and bring denied. there’s absolutely no way LE can legally demand medical records sans warrant.”

    I think you might have forgotten that HIPAA is a Federal law an Federal law intransigently refuses to recognize anything medical about cannabis.

    Without looking it up I seem to recall the opposite of your memory. But even if you remember correctly it was a State law that kept the information from the Feds. Hey, you know we could both be recalling correctly. One State protected their patients, another one didn’t. But it most certainly wasn’t HIPAA doing the protectin’.

  47. #47 |  Pi Guy | 

    BTW, what, exactly, is the harm … that she might get high?

    The War on Flowers (WoF) is closely tied to the dark evil core at the heart of the liberal agenda against We the Little People {[TM], (c), patent pending}: we exist to produce value generate tax revenue for Big Gov. If you’re high, you’re not operating at 100% optimumity *snicker* thereby denying your humble, faithful elected servants the money they need to pay for… important stuff.

  48. #48 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    @#30

    You sir, are a serious yogurt eater, if you know what I mean.

    Why do I feel Boscoh has an onion tied to his belt (which was the style at the time)?

    we exist to generate tax revenue for Big Gov.

    Finally, an appropriate time to use the reply “THIS!”

  49. #49 |  Nancy Lebovitz | 

    #12 | DeadLenny

    Minuscule nitpick: Lenhart was injured in a climbing accident, not a car accident.

  50. #50 |  KristenS | 

    mean, some jittery dude showing up at Walgreen’s with a prescription for 300 Dilaudid would justifiably raise some eyebrows

    I don’t see any justification. Let a tweaker get his fix. Did you need government intervention to quit drinking, or were you one of the lucky ones who was able to seek help and take recovery seriously?

  51. #51 |  croaker | 

    Actually, I do blame the pharmacist, and if that were me she’d be answering both a personal malpractice lawsuit and a complaint before the State Board of Pharmacy.

  52. #52 |  Pi Guy | 

    You sir, are a serious yogurt eater, if you know what I mean.

    No, have no idea at all what you mean. But I can certainly tell that you hold yogurt, and by granting titles and what-not, and the esteemed Mr. Balko in high, high regard.

  53. #53 |  croaker | 

    @40 Go to youtube and do a search on “God Bless America trailer”. Right idea, needed a larger selection of targets.

  54. #54 |  croaker | 

    @47 Go back a few days. RB had a link to a study on mice that found yogurt eaters had bigger balls and a more vigorous sex life.

  55. #55 |  (B)oscoH, Yogurt Eater | 

    And yogurt eating mice walk with swagger!!

  56. #56 |  demize! | 

    300 Dilauded is enough to kill several Elephants, but thats their business, this pharmacist is an over zealous busybody and should be delicensed for myriad reasons. The cop is an imbecile as are most of them, they have huge latitude on what they choose to enforce and what they choose not to. Its just a parade of poor decisions and bad judgement.

  57. #57 |  Miranda | 

    Notice this happened in Oak Cliff, an area of Dallas with a fairly high minority population. I’m willing to bet there are many more housewives in the Park Cities getting stoned off their gourds with pain killers than people in this area, but that’s not who is getting arrested.

  58. #58 |  perlhaqr | 

    Croaker @#51: and a complaint before the State Board of Pharmacy

    Being married to a pharmacist, and being an EMT myself, I can assure you that would have gone precisely nowhere. The BoP is right in bed with the DEA.

  59. #59 |  frankania | 

    Better still, Come to Mexico. Medical care is very cheap ( private clinic visits as low as $2), and medicine not only cheap, but no prescription needed.

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