Good News From New York

Monday, April 2nd, 2012

NYPD’s civilian review board will finally get some teeth.

The civilian board that reviews complaints of NYPD misconduct will get the power to prosecute those allegations in departmental trials — except in certain cases, officials said Tuesday.

Currently, the Civilian Complaint Review Board investigates complaints it receives, but refers substantiated cases to the NYPD for prosecution.

The change covers cases ranging from excessive force and abuse of authority to foul language.

The CCRB will prosecute substantiated complaints before NYPD tribunals, and will have the power to plea bargain cases.

“I’ve heard a lot of complaints from New Yorkers that they feel the Civilian Complaint Review Board is a toothless tiger,” City Council Speaker Christine Quinn said. “This gives teeth to the CCRB.”

Quinn said the agreement involved extensive deliberations between Council leaders, NYPD brass and City Hall.

“We want the public to have confidence that police misconduct cases are being handled fairly and competently,” added Councilman Daniel Garodnick (D-Manhattan), who in 2010 introduced a bill to give CCRB prosecutorial power.

There are some exceptions, but this is a great step. The union is of course livid. This would be the same union that late last year organized a thuggish protest outside a city courtroom in which member officers harassed and assaulted journalists. They were upset that dozens of their brethren had been indicted on over 1,600 counts, ranging from fixing traffic tickets (all of the cops accused of fixing tickets were past or present union officials) to smuggling, brutality, and drug distribution.

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11 Responses to “Good News From New York”

  1. #1 |  picachu | 

    Awesome news! Maybe it ain’t much but its a start.

  2. #2 |  David | 

    And remember, the cops didn’t deny the ticket-fixing. They were just upset it was being prosecuted.

  3. #3 |  Burgers Allday | 

    Poor Professor Moskos. D00dz gonna be bummed.

  4. #4 |  C. S. P. Schofield | 

    OIf course ideally we’d see the Police Union being treated as the criminal enterprise that it acts like, but I suppose one must start somewhere.

  5. #5 |  Dave Krueger | 

    FTA: Currently, the Civilian Complaint Review Board investigates complaints it receives, but refers substantiated cases to the NYPD for prosecution.

    LMAO! If a fox eats a hen, we’ll ask the other foxes to scold him.

  6. #6 |  Yizmo Gizmo | 

    Under Giuliani’s Reign of Terror, when I lived in NYC, CCRB was a joke. I remember one incident where Rudy went into a crazy rage over it, establishing himself as a fiery-tempered enabler of lawlessness. Then came Justin Volpe with his baton-rape and the Amadou Diallo case and the demise of NYC cops proclaiming “We own the night.”

    http://revcom.us/a/v20/980-89/982/ccrb.htm

    “In reality, the CCRB is a toothless agency. They cannot discipline cops. All they are authorized to do is investigate complaints and determine whether or not they think they are real–in their words, they decide if the complaint is “substantiated” or “unsubstantiated.” The record of the CCRB is revealing. According to the NY Times, between July 1993 and December 1996 the CCRB handled 16,327 complaints –and substantiated only 690. In other words, only about 4 in 100 complaints are not dismissed outright by the CCRB.”

  7. #7 |  xysmith | 

    Their? Really?

  8. #8 |  Dante | 

    “The civilian board that reviews complaints of NYPD misconduct will get the power to prosecute those allegations in departmental trials — except in certain cases, officials said Tuesday.”

    Why do I get the sinking feeling …..

    Those “certain cases” are ones which involve any type of public servant.

  9. #9 |  Jerryskids | 

    @ #8 – My thoughts exactly. *Saying* you are going to do something about the NYPD and the union is a start, but I ain’t holding my breath waiting to see if anything actually does get done. City Council vs. NYPD? Wasn’t it Dinkins and the City Council who created the all-civilian CCRB to take care of the excesses of the NYPD in the first place? How did that work out?

  10. #10 |  Jim | 

    Cops are civilians too.

  11. #11 |  NL_ | 

    So wait, the covered up crimes include assault, drug smuggling and insurance scams, but it’s called the ticket-fixing scandal?

    Might as well claim that 9/11 was “the day four airplanes deviated from FAA-approved air travel lanes.” Talk about burying the lede.

    I get that ticket-fixing is a persistent problem that reflects the special privileges cops think they deserve. But calling it the ticket fixing scandal suggests that this was a symbolic prosecution of merely nominal corruption. Like they’re just being rigid about relatively harmless rules. But if the charges are true (and how much can you ever really trust prosecutors?) at least some of this is about blatant and dangerous police corruption.

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