Morning Links

Wednesday, March 28th, 2012
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62 Responses to “Morning Links”

  1. #1 |  A Critic | 

    “Matthew Yglesias convincingly defends the inferior bagel.”

    How is that convincing?

    He says “But the Lenders, with their workflow-smoothing use of the freezer, proved to be innovators in the field of mediocrity.”

    The man defends garbage on the basis that it is popular. That is the fallacy of the appeal to popularity. Yes, it might sell, but it’s garbage being eaten by pigs who are too ignorant to know how pathetically wretched they and their lives are.

    “The fundamental story of Lender’s Frozen Bagels is that the winning product isn’t always the best one. ”

    That’s true when you have a statist society of mass produced mind controlled consumers.

    “Like Ikea for furniture, H&M for clothing, or the Olive Garden for Italian food, Lender’s innovated by finding a way to compromise on quality and reap huge gains in other spheres. ”

    Ikea has 1) HORRIBLE design from a functional standpoint. It’s complicated and breaks easily. 2) It’s built out of garbage quality materials. I don’t know H&M, but the Olive Garden also produces garbage that can only be enjoyed by someone with no taste buds or no taste.

    “albeit in severely bowdlerized form, much too big and lacking the textural contrast produced by poaching the dough before baking”

    They aren’t even bagels! To even qualify as a bad bagel you HAVE to boil it. Otherwise it’s just a funny shaped roll that is sold fraudulently.

    I was going to wait another day or two, but I’m going to start some more bagels today. Real bagels. They aren’t hard to make.

    Sincerely,

    A Critic (who used to be a professional bagel maker).

  2. #2 |  A Critic | 

    “Lender’s innovated by finding a way to compromise on quality and reap huge gains in other spheres. ”

    What other spheres? Oh yeah, the sphere of profiting off of idiots who don’t know, understand, or care about bagels, food, quality, beauty, truth, and life.

    “But often this is how the world changes.”

    Yes, that is true, that is often how the world changes FOR THE WORSE. His argument is also true of education – it’s a phony imitation of the real thing that allows people to delude themselves into thinking they are actually doing something meaningful and worthwhile with their lives.

  3. #3 |  Mike T | 

    Meanwhile, vigilante-minded celebrities (most notably Spike Lee) post what they wrongly claim is Zimmerman’s address to their Twitter accounts, terrorizing an older couple.

    This ought to be an open and shut case of incitement to violence and any violence that comes to the couple should be civilly actionable against Lee with no limit on damages.

  4. #4 |  Yizmo Gizmo | 

    •D.C. Metro system plagued by incompetence, corruption, and discrimination.

    Compared to Europe or Japan, American public transportation –from taxis to trains–is unreliable, slow, outdated, user-unfriendly and just plain weird. There needs to be a Transportation Revolution, as there was an electronics or internet revolution. With gas at $4/gallon, everyone seems to agree on this. Question is, what’s taking ‘em so fucking long?

  5. #5 |  A Critic | 

    Sorry to comment so much but I hate the advocation of fraud and mediocrity.

    “And if you look at the health care and higher education corners of the American economy where spiraling costs are bankrupting the middle class, you see sectors that are largely untouched by this kind of low-end innovation. The world could probably use a few more Murray Lenders.”

    Ah, so what the man wants is fraudulent health care and education sold at a much lower price than the real thing and he wants it made out of the lowest quality components that only replace the real thing if you don’t know or care about the product working or lasting. They already have homeopathic cures for everything so he’s wrong that this sort of innovation doesn’t exist in the healthcare market.

  6. #6 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    Man cuts off foot, throws it in furnace to avoid job assignment

    We used to rate how dreaded certain meetings were by what body part we’d cut off to get out of going. So, I salute this man’s initiative.

  7. #7 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    I sure hope A Critic is driving a Ferrari every day as anything else is just idiotic.

  8. #8 |  A Critic | 

    @Boyd Durkin

    Ferraris cost hundreds of thousands of dollars and require a substantial amount of upkeep, thus pushing them beyond the budget of nearly everyone. In addition they are of a highly specialized nature not suited to where I live.

    Bagels on the other hand cost pocket change and are within the budget of very nearly everyone in this country, and they are widely adaptable to a variety of cuisines suitable to anywhere in the country where people don’t eat the concoctions of food science that are fraudulently billed as the real thing. The car equivalent of a Lender’s bagel would be a Yugo being sold as a Ferrari. I’m not saying people can’t or shouldn’t eat such things – but don’t tell me your piece of junk is a Ferrari or that your mediocre garbage is somehow an innovation benefiting the world.

  9. #9 |  Cyto | 

    I found some of the rabble-rousing on the Martin case to be surprising. There are a lot of people attaching their names to things that appear to be criminal calls to violence. I’ll be surprised if anyone gets prosecuted, but I’m pretty sure that posting someone’s name and address to 40,000 people and calling for someone to go and harm them is not protected speech.

    The fact that they got the address wrong and are sicking their dogs on the wrong couple may be what draws the attention, but the calls for vigilante violence would still be appalling if they had gotten the details right.

  10. #10 |  Kid Handsome | 

    In the pantheon of breads, bagels are the absolute worst. A large part of that is bagel snobs. It’s like knowing . . . and telling everyone . . . what the best variety of canned green beans is.

    My favorite thing about bagel snobs is how everytime I suggest that bagels aren’t the manna of the gods, it is suggested that I have simply never had a good, true, bakery fresh bagel – as if there is some mythical Pegasus of a bagel that will turn my evil heart pure.

    SHUT UP!

  11. #11 |  Cyto | 

    Kid Handsome: I don’t want to be in any way associated with a pointless internet flame war….. but you pretty much nailed it.

    Damn, how did I get sucked in to that one?

  12. #12 |  that guy | 

    Bagel snob here. No apologies about it.

  13. #13 |  Eric | 

    I thought the bagel article was fantastic, and right on. If Murray Lender hadn’t innovated a (not bad at all, to my 9-year-old self) frozen bagel, maybe we would never have had the bagel world domination that exists today. As a guy who loves bagels, that would be sad indeed.

    And I thought the Ikea and H&M comparisons were apt. No, Ikea is not the best furniture in the world. But yes, it looks decent, holds up reasonably well, is way cheap, and is easy to get home and put together. Maybe in a perfect world we’d all have artisan crafted dressers, but my $219 Floorgbaak model does the trick nicely.

  14. #14 |  EBL | 

    If you are going to talk of ugly in the Trayvon Martin matter, how about Spike Lee tweeting out George Zimmerman’s address…only to have it be the wrong address and put some elderly couple in danger and hiding….

  15. #15 |  EBL | 

    My bad. You got it. BTW, check out the commentary from Wretchard on this issue. His post was one of the best out there. Sister Toldjah did a great job too.

  16. #16 |  MattJ | 

    A Critic:

    This nation was founded on one principle above all else: the requirement that we stand up for what we believe, no matter the odds or the consequences. When the mob and the press and the whole world tell you to move, your job is to plant yourself like a tree beside the river of truth, and tell the whole world — “No, you move.”

    If bagel quality is your thing, more power to you. Keep in mind though… for the rest of us, it’s just bagels.

  17. #17 |  C. S. P. Schofield | 

    Yizmo Gizmo,

    I’m curious; have you actually lived in Europe or Japan, and have extensive day-to-day experience with their Public Transportation? Because I suspect that the difference isn’t nearly as marked as you suggest.

    That said, I’m not surprised that Congress’s Toy Train Set doesn’t run smoothly.

  18. #18 |  a leap at the wheel | 

    MattJ – Is there any doubt that JMS should have been the one to write the whole damn Civil War? That was such a great, great line for a character that needs to sound like Jefferson or Sam Adams, but rarely does.

  19. #19 |  Highway | 

    Yizmo, there won’t be any sort of ‘transportation revolution’, unless there’s some mode that is either 2 orders of magnitudes more energy efficient (and hence at least an order of magnitude cheaper), or some other pressure that will convincingly change the way people live, density wise.

    But let’s face it: Nobody in the US is willing to pay the actual costs associated with mass transit to ride it. I’d think this is probably true of the entire world as well, as mass transit is not something that is profitable. Maybe you could find a system or two that, ignoring capitalization costs, actually run in the black on an operating budget. People expect that mass transit will be cheap. It’s not. Trains are expensive ($100 million per mile is an old estimate just for tracking), and the only way they are done in the US is to make millions of non-users pay for them, at dubious benefit to them.

  20. #20 |  MattJ | 

    a leap at the wheel:

    My only exposure to comics, their characters, and storylines since about 1992* has been through movies and tvtropes.org (which is where I learned of that quote) so I’ve never read any of Civil War. Just got a little exposure through the pop-culture meme website.

    *My recollection is that the X-men went through the Siege Perilous and died (died again?!) and I decided to move on from the medium.

  21. #21 |  Bad Medicine | 

    Regarding the police union giving $500 to an officer involved in a shooting – I can imagine the original intent behind it. Most police officers are pretty torn up when they actually have to use their gun against someone, and killing someone can cause depression and other psychological issues. Being given a small token of support by your union as a pick-me-up could be a real blessing, and help you know you’re not alone in dealing with the aftermath.

    Having said that, I can think of much better ways to show support than to just flat out give someone $500, and I can’t imagine that someone didn’t think that making a policy like that could have the appearance of a bounty or motivation for escalating a situation, etc. Next time, maybe help with counseling bills instead?

  22. #22 |  JOR | 

    It’s always fun to guess how long a rant against consumerism will take to devolve into pure classist drivel, no matter how strong it seems to start off. A critic did not disappoint.

  23. #23 |  Jozef | 

    C. S. P. Schofield,

    I moved back to Europe after 16 years in the US, and I do have extensive day-to-day experience with public transport. And the difference between Europe and the US is truly like day and night. I’m actually enjoying the fact that I don’t need a car here. All cities I’ve lived in (Brussels, Paris, Prague, Bratislava) have very efficient and affordable public transportation. I’m currently in Dublin (been here for 6 months so far), where you don’t need a permit to operate a taxi. The other day, while I was waiting for a bus at about 4:30 AM, I counted an average of 15 cabs going by per minute. When intoxicated, I tend to take a cab home rather than risking taking the wrong bus, and they are always very clean, courteous, efficient and English speaking. All in all, the US is so far behind in public transportation that it would take an Eisenhower Interstates level of investment to catch up.

  24. #24 |  C. S. P. Schofield | 

    Highway,

    “Nobody in the US is willing to pay the actual costs associated with mass transit to ride it.”

    And this is NOT NEW. The history of the railroads in the United States (at least as it is currently being interpreted) seems to show that trunk lines made money, but only when the feeder lines were subsidised, often resulting in an overall loss, at least for passengers. Money made in railroads was mostly made in real estate dealings, stock manipulation, or freight. And even freight didn’t pay anything like what it was worth to society at large.

    Also; people tend to assume that mass transit is government owned or subject to government pressure. When the fares rise they complain to their representatives, and so even privately owned Mass Transit is pushed to charge unrealistic fares. That inevitably comes out of maintenance, and eventually the whole boiling looks like the subways in the world of Escape From New York, and nobody with any choice uses them.

    Furthermore, for some reason, politicians tend to favor Mass Transit projects that simply don’t make any sense, even before close scrutiny.

  25. #25 |  Robert | 

    http://wondermark.com/813/
    http://wondermark.com/814/
    http://wondermark.com/815/
    http://wondermark.com/816/

    Replace “Tic Tacs” with “Bagels”.

  26. #26 |  JOR | 

    Even someone who doesn’t share the crybaby reaction the Freedom And Personal Responsibility crowd seems to have to vigilantism should agree that inciting violence against innocent third parties is not acceptable and anyone who does it ought to be held liable.

  27. #27 |  Felix | 

    The best bagel is the one you have at hand, which may be the one from the freezer, as opposed to the one from the bagel bakery which is too far away, or the one you won’t make at home because you don’t have the ingredients or the time or don’t want to make just one bagel, or make a dozen and throw away 11.

    Now if A Critic wants to be a snob and only eat freshly made bagels, that is none of my business, just as it is none of A Critic’s business if I want to eat that frozen bagel which I can get rather than not eat a better one which I can’t get.

  28. #28 |  Mattocracy | 

    What seperates Europe cities from most American cities is population density. We’re a post automobile culture allowing our communities to build out rather than being forced to go verticle because of the transporation limitations of the past.

    It’s very difficult for mass transit to be profitable in a low density areas. The European mass transit model isn’t going to work in America.

  29. #29 |  Yizmo Gizmo | 

    “It’s very difficult for mass transit to be profitable in a low density areas. The European mass transit model isn’t going to work in America.”

    I just don’t think that’s true. The population density of
    PA, OH, NJ, RI, and I-95 corridor, with 35 million or so along it,
    must be about the same as Germany or France, no?

  30. #30 |  el coronado | 

    About the Albuquerque ‘bounties-for-coppers’ program – Y’Know, everybody knows about the famously corrupt states. Illinois, Joizey, Louisiana, Noo Yawk, Rhode Island…all the usual suspects. But I’d match up New Mexico, even thought they’re small and don’t get a lotta pub, with any of those places if we go pound-for-pound. *Breathtakingly* corrupt state.

  31. #31 |  pim FEE | 

    We’re a post automobile culture

  32. #32 |  Ted S. | 

    Yizmo Gizmo:

    I looked this up several years ago. France (the entire country not counting the overseas departments) is the median country for population density in the European Union, with about 280 people per square mile. There are about a dozen states that have that high a population density: MA, RI, CT, NY, NJ, DE, PA, MD, OH; I think FL may have gotten there in the past decade, with CA and IL possibly getting there.

    If we need mass transit, what we need for inter-city transit is a rail system that’s somewhat faster than buses, but not the “High Speed Rail” that liberals want to spend billions on. Within cities, probably buses.

  33. #33 |  Yizmo Gizmo | 

    but not the “High Speed Rail” that liberals want to spend billions on…

    My last Amtrak ride took 7 hours to get from Raleigh NC to Washington DC.
    280 miles/7 = 40 mph.
    That aint high speed. That aint regular speed. That’s ultra-low-speed and
    it needs to go.

  34. #34 |  C. S. P. Schofield | 

    About bagels and other foods; people get to know food outside their early experience mostly through mediocre popularizers. Those that like the lowest common denominator version look for better. Also, I like to ask “What is this competing against”. For example; Olive Garden isn’t competing against the best Italian Bistros in New York City. Olive Garden is competing against the spaghetti platter at Denny’s. On that basis, it ain’t half bad. Lender’s Bagels were’n originally competing against the good ones from the local jewish bakery. They were competing against toasted Wonder Bread, on which they were a decided improvement, and Thomas’s English Muffins (where which you pick is a matter of taste).

    Of course occasionally you get a Lowest Common Denominator food product that is just plain bad. Red Lobster may be competing with Denny’s fish platter, but they are losing.

  35. #35 |  StrangeOne | 

    Yizmo,

    I think hes talking about the proposed bullet train that would serve the east coast, parts of the Midwest, and California. The one that’s supposed to run 300 miles an hour. But yeah, the American train system is a disgrace, to much cronyism was used to build it so most of it is worthless, crumbling, and unprofitable. I was thinking about taking a train ride across the country this summer but the more research I do the less excited I am about it.

  36. #36 |  Mattocracy | 

    @ Yizmo # 28,

    No, the population along I-95 is still spread out in a spacious subdivisions and the like. See the link below. We do not have the same population desities that Europe has. Europe has tightly packed cities with relatively unpopulated space (compared to the US) in between them. They don’t have the same suburbanation (just pretend that’s a word) that we do here.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/mitopencourseware/3220447894/

    Also, France and Germany have pops in the 60-80 million range.

  37. #37 |  Michael Chaney | 

    You can’t talk about that Martin photo mixup without mentioning the looney left at Media Matters claiming that a recent picture of Martin wasn’t him:

    http://www.foxnews.com/us/2012/03/27/media-matters-honcho-sorry-after-blasting-drudge-for-trayvon-photo/

  38. #38 |  PeeDub | 

    Chapel Hill, NC bans *all* cell phone use while driving.

    http://www.newsobserver.com/2012/03/26/1960281/chapel-hill-to-consider-cell-phone.html

  39. #39 |  Personanongrata | 

    D.C. Metro system plagued by incompetence, corruption, and discrimination.

    The tyranny of good intentions.

    Affirmative action is a failure; advancement in the workplace or at school should be based solely upon merit not your skin-color, ethnicity, religion, gender, sexual-orientation, nepotism or cronyism.

  40. #40 |  A Critic | 

    @Matt J

    “If bagel quality is your thing, more power to you. Keep in mind though… for the rest of us, it’s just bagels.”

    Yes, but they aren’t really bagels.

    If you like to drink cheap blended Scotch that comes in a large plastic jug – that’s fine by me. If you like to call it a fine 18 year old single malt – that’s not fine by me.

    The same thing with balsamic vinegar – if it comes in a gallon jug and costs 18 bucks and takes a month to make it just ain’t the same thing as the thing that comes in a 100 ml bottle designed by Giugiaro, a well-known designer for Bugatti, Ferrari and Maserati, that takes 12 to 100+ years to make and that costs 180+ bucks. If you like the crap, fine, but don’t tell me it’s the good stuff.

    If you like Big Macs, that’s cool. Try telling me that a Big Mac is really a Kobe steak – not cool at all.

    Imitation foods are fine for imitation people. Phonies can fool themselves but they can’t fool me.

  41. #41 |  PeeDub | 

    I suddenly appreciate crappy bagels a hella lot more now. Wonder why …

  42. #42 |  Karl | 

    Imitation foods are fine for imitation people. Phonies can fool themselves but they can’t fool me

    Sigh. Even though I’m a bit of a food snob (beer mostly, but food too, to a degree), this
    stuff just… Look, some people don’t value the things you do. They may value 0.50 cents per bagel vs $1.50 per bagel more than eating the ‘better’ bagel. Doesn’t make
    them imitation. It makes them value things differently than you. Maybe they don’t value
    spending $50/lb for meat, but would rather have a big mac and $45 to buy some high
    end beer. Or go watch a Michael Bay movie or something. NOT IMITATION PEOPLE.
    Different than you.
    -K

  43. #43 |  Roy | 

    “If you like to call it a fine 18 year old single malt – that’s not fine by me. ”

    Tough

    I’ll call it whatever I damn well please and there isn’t a thing you can do about it.

  44. #44 |  Stormy Dragon | 

    @A Critic:

    De gustibus es non disputandum.

  45. #45 |  awp | 

    I don’t think I have ever had a Lender’s frozen bagel, but A Critic has convinced me to try.

  46. #46 |  MattJ | 

    A Critic:

    Yes, but they aren’t really bagels.

    Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

    I’ve never eaten a bagel. Seriously.

    I don’t drink at all. I have never used balsamic vinegar, and at a buck-eighty a mL, I can’t imagine why I ever would.

    Food is fuel. The food I eat doesn’t define me, it keeps me healthy and alive. As far as what’s ‘the good stuff’ goes, the work of Frederic Brochet has convinced me that expert wine tasters can’t tell when they’ve been served white wine died red, and that they report identical wine as having “nearly opposite” quality if it’s served from different bottles (maybe you’re onto something with the special bottle for your balsamic vinegar). Putting a fancy name on a process used to make food 4% more palatable and 300% more expensive sounds like a fun hobby for some people. Defending that name against the onslaught of the unwashed masses will no doubt keep you busy, but they’re not going to listen to you. I will, though.

    Because it’s funny.

  47. #47 |  MattJ | 

    *dyed red

  48. #48 |  freedomfan | 

    I’d like to propose this as an alternative headline of the day.

    Regarding bagels but avoiding the foodie purist issue: As often as I disagree with Matthew Yglesias, I applaud him for acknowledging the value of low-end providers.

    More importantly, though I don’t usually see him as a free market champion, Yglesias is dead on that lack of low-end cost pressure in other markets is part of the reason we see unsustainable increases in the costs of other things, like health care. Markets that welcome innovation even at the low end realize many benefits, a greater variety of products and services being the most obvious, but not the least of which is downward price pressure on the mid-level and high-end segments of the market. Knowing that a product is available for 49 cents helps consumers evaluate whether they want to spend $2.19 for a similar item, even if it is much improved. When the government comes “protects” us from choosing to buy the low-end product, we see obvious results like taxi cab medallion rackets and less obvious results like $3000 IV bags showing up on a surgery bill.

  49. #49 |  H. Rearden | 

    I believe that it was the great Radley Balko that posted this a few months ago. Seems appropriate for A Critic.
    Celebrity Chef Ted Allen Cooks His Favorite Pretentious Foodie Bullshit Meal

  50. #50 |  Boyd Durkinb | 

    Bagels (and their fans) need to know their proper place. I’m a Donut man.

    http://www.seriouseats.com/images/20100708-lordbagel.jpg

  51. #51 |  Helmut O' Hooligan | 

    RE: Trayvon Martin case reactions…

    And the vicious cycle keeps spinning. This lends credibility to the following ancient teaching:

    “For hatred does not cease by hatred at any time: hatred ceases by love, this is an old rule.”
    –Attributed to the Buddha (Siddhartha Gautama)

  52. #52 |  Other Sean | 

    I think we can all agree that things would be better in America today if Travyon Martin and George Zimmerman had joined forces to destroy the computer that “A Critic” is now using to spread his totalitarian philosophy of bagels.

  53. #53 |  CC | 

    ABC news has a police surveillance video of George Zimmerman the night of his arrest and there does not appear to be a mark on the man. (Yes, the ABC news banner gets in the way for a bit, but you do see the back of his head clearly about a minute in and there’s no visible sign of any injury, which makes the “Zimmerman’s head pounded into the pavement” story highly questionable.)

    http://abcnews.go.com/WNT/trayvon-martin-case-exclusive-surveillance-video-george-zimmerman/story?id=16022897#.T3Owxo4WUXx

  54. #54 |  Windy | 

    #44 Stormy Dragon “De gustibus es non disputandum.” My mother took eight years of Latin in HS and college (along with Spanish, French and German), she used to use that phrase all the time, but she said it slightly differently: “De gustibus non disputandum es.” = To each his own poison. She intended to be an interpreter until WWII struck, instead she left college 15 hours (credits) from graduation, went to work in the shipyards, and soon married my dad just before he was sent overseas by the Army Air Corps to the European theater as a belly gunner. She never went back to finish those last hours of college but she had a successful life in business, anyway.

  55. #55 |  el coronado | 

    Bagels Schmagels. Now, *pork rinds*…

  56. #56 |  H. Rearden | 

    ‘Deep dish pizza’ IS NOT PIZZA. Whoever disagrees can take it to the judge. Justice Scalia Rules Against Deep-Dish Pizza

  57. #57 |  A Critic | 

    “Doesn’t make
    them imitation. It makes them value things differently than you.”

    OK, and you go ahead and ride around in your Miata and tell everyone it’s a Bugatti, cuz you so real.

  58. #58 |  A Critic | 

    “I don’t drink at all. I have never used balsamic vinegar, and at a buck-eighty a mL, I can’t imagine why I ever would.”

    To experience one of the few pleasures equal to the finest sex or drugs?

    “Food is fuel.”

    And life is just time. Families are just carbon and water.

    “The food I eat doesn’t define me, it keeps me healthy and alive. As far as what’s ‘the good stuff’ goes, the work of Frederic Brochet has convinced me that expert wine tasters can’t tell when they’ve been served white wine died red, and that they report identical wine as having “nearly opposite” quality if it’s served from different bottles (maybe you’re onto something with the special bottle for your balsamic vinegar). Putting a fancy name on a process used to make food 4% more palatable and 300% more expensive sounds like a fun hobby for some people. Defending that name against the onslaught of the unwashed masses will no doubt keep you busy, but they’re not going to listen to you. I will, though.”

    There is a dramatic difference between balsamic vinegar and traditional balsamic vinegar. The first is a wine vinegar. You can make it in a million gallon stainless steel tank. The second is a must vinegar, it’s made from juice not wine. It is stored in wooden barrels and transferred from one barrel to a slightly smaller one for at least 12 years up to over 100 years in someone’s attic. Now, I actually like the crap, but it’s crap. It’s great for salads. It would be awful on cheese. The real stuff is terrible for salads and awesome on cheese.

    I used to smoke Swisher Sweets. I appreciate them, but they are crap. Only a phony would claim they are Cubans.

  59. #59 |  A Critic | 

    “‘Deep dish pizza’ IS NOT PIZZA.”

    That is correct.

  60. #60 |  David | 

    Also, pasta as invented in early modern Italy did not include wagon-wheel shapes, so rotelle is not pasta. You phonies.

  61. #61 |  A Critic | 

    “Also, pasta as invented in early modern Italy did not include wagon-wheel shapes, so rotelle is not pasta. You phonies.”

    What about Kraft Mac&Cheese, the orange kind? Is that pasta? It’s not real pasta.

    And I do love the stuff. Shame I won’t ever eat it again.

  62. #62 |  el coronado | 

    Didn’t think it was possible, but apparently food snobs are even more insufferable than wine snobs. Defining oneself by what one ingests is as sensible as self-definition by quality/texture/purity of one’s bowel movements. (“Look at that beauty there!!”) You silly fuckers.

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