Morning Links

Wednesday, March 21st, 2012
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63 Responses to “Morning Links”

  1. #1 |  Kerade | 

    RE: Siding arrest – and to think most people still don’t believe we live in a police state.

  2. #2 |  Bronwyn | 

    Well, obviously the Oregonian editor was merely trying to prove his point. Prostitution is deadly!

    That’s dedication, man.

  3. #3 |  C. S. P. Schofield | 

    “I’d submit that if you’re so terrified of dogs that you think you were “forced” to kill a boxer puppy and pregnant chihuahua, maybe you aren’t cut out to be a police officer.”

    I’d say you shouldn’t be wandering about without supervision; you’re clearly a delicate flower who must be protected from the brutality of life.

  4. #4 |  dave smith | 

    When I say the state’s power flows from a gun, people look at me like I am crazy. The siding story proves me right.

  5. #5 |  tim | 

    The Burnsville case reminds me of the interns the City of Minneapolis were sending out to homeowners who didn’t “properly maintain” their property at the height of the housing boom. Usually peeling paint or older roofs. And almost always elderly owners who couldn’t afford a new paint job. I once got a citation for not shoveling the snow off my sidewalk within 24 hours. In April. When the temperature the next day was 60.

    Those interns and those citations magically disappeared when the housing boom went bust. The City and the County are now content with just paying your property taxes on time.

  6. #6 |  Maria | 

    How is that these cops are such crappy shots and have such poor gun control that there’s always a dog or two that get “caught in the line of fire?” How do these police chiefs keep a straight face when feeding the media these lines?

  7. #7 |  Danny | 

    Forget Foxconn. You can buy an iPad or not. Check out the factories where your shirts and pants and underwear are made. What choice do you have there? Sew your own?

  8. #8 |  Aresen | 

    OT, but an issue Radley has some personal experience with – Identity Theft Tax Fraud:

    http://lifeinc.today.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2012/03/21/10776696-for-identity-theft-victims-paying-taxes-is-a-nightmare

  9. #9 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    I’d submit that if you’re so terrified of dogs that you think you were “forced” to kill a boxer puppy and pregnant chihuahua, maybe you aren’t cut out to be a police officer.

    I’d say “aren’t cut out to be a human”, but the police force has a lower bar.

    23 year old prostitute…sex act killed man

    Good lord I am so curious now!

  10. #10 |  Brandon | 

    Danny, you can buy clothing made in the USA. It probably costs more, but you absolutely have a choice. Of course, since premises like that usually lead to some sort of “we should force everyone to pay more and let those poor Chinese workers return to their noble subsistence farming” screed, I’m gonna go ahead and assume you don’t care about that choice.

  11. #11 |  (B)oscoH | 

    I have two Boxers and two Boxer mixes. Sad, sad story.

    But this Oregonian editor prostitution story just has so many layers. The old guy got fucked to death by a 23-year old in exchange for buying her college books? Seriously, wouldn’t it be less expensive to just pay her?? And he had recently taken his Pullitzer prize-winning editorial skills to a series of editorials railing against prostitution. And he was married. Will a competing news outlet please get a comment from his widow? That would make this perfect. Oh, thoughts a prayers to all involved in covering up his reputation.

  12. #12 |  Max | 

    Killing dogs has nothing to do with courage or lack of it; cruelty to animals is the mark of a sociopath. Also part of training: The SS trained their men to be cruel by giving them a puppy, letting them raise it for a time & then when the man graduated from SS training, he killed the puppy.

  13. #13 |  Dwight Brown | 

    (B)oscoH:

    According to >a href=”http://jimromenesko.com/2012/03/21/woman-who-was-with-oregonian-editor-is-an-internet-call-girl/”>a story linked from Romenesko, she was a professional who charged $200 an hour.

    I’m not 100% clear on how long the relationship lasted (one story says “about a year”) but I do have some idea of what textbooks cost; depending on how many encounters there were, he might have gotten a pretty good deal. (I had a course last year where new copies of the text sold for close to $200. And that was just one book.)

  14. #14 |  Mike | 

    “Mad Lib headline of the day! Also, “pork doughnut” sounds dirty.”

    Bacon Dough-nuts sound delicious!

  15. #15 |  Danny | 

    Brandon — you can get a very limited selection of goods from Amerian Apparel, if you live near a store or go through the trouble of buying clothes online. But if you shop at the mall like everybody else, forget it. You’ve got one source for clothing: China.

  16. #16 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    Danny, you can buy clothing made in the USA.

    Real Americans stitch together their own clothes and then send a check to the AFL-CIO so as not to compromise American workers.

  17. #17 |  EBL | 

    It should be a crime to put aluminium siding on a home!

  18. #18 |  Nullifier | 

    Someone please explain to me how a code violation can be anything but a civil matter? Sounds like a Title 42 action to me.

  19. #19 |  Judas Peckerwood | 

    “Man is arrested, cuffed, booked, and jailed because. . . ready for this one? . . . he couldn’t afford to finish putting aluminum siding on his home.”

    Radley, you left out the ongoing electronic home monitoring he’s being subjected to.

  20. #20 |  Kit Smith | 

    RE: The FAA ban – while it’s utterly ridiculous to think that merely having electronics turned on actually interferes with the radio communication systems, there is a safety concern about said portable electronics during takeoff and landing. If the plane is forced to take emergency maneuvers, loose electronic devices can easily be flung about the cabin and essentially become ballistic objects. It isn’t common, especially in larger aircraft, but it’s definitely a possibility.

  21. #21 |  Mannie | 

    #18 | Nullifier | March 21st, 2012 at 12:56 pm

    Someone please explain to me how a code violation can be anything but a civil matter? Sounds like a Title 42 action to me.

    Not only should it be only a civil matter, but the Court’s savagery toward the Citizen is appalling. Initially denied bail, then put on an ankle bracelet? I know of a couple of mopes charged with Child Molestation who are free on $2,500 bail bonds. Hell, even murders get bail nowadays.

  22. #22 |  Mannie | 

    #20 | Kit Smith | March 21st, 2012 at 1:04 pm

    If the plane is forced to take emergency maneuvers, loose electronic devices can easily be flung about the cabin and essentially become ballistic objects. It isn’t common, especially in larger aircraft, but it’s definitely a possibility.

    IMO, that’s enough justification to ban them during taxiing, takeoff, and landing. If you can’t be without your electronic toys for a few minutes, you’re a loser.

  23. #23 |  Aresen | 

    Kit Smith | March 21st, 2012 at 1:04 pm

    If the plane is forced to take emergency maneuvers, loose electronic devices can easily be flung about the cabin and essentially become ballistic objects. It isn’t common, especially in larger aircraft, but it’s definitely a possibility.

    Uh. The same can be said of any object that isn’t actually secured. Merely turning off an electronic device isn’t going to make it any less of a projectile hazard.

  24. #24 |  Juice | 

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/story/2012/03/16/calgary-aggressive-dog-chase-update.html

    Cops shot at dogs (and missed) because they were chasing kids.

  25. #25 |  Jerryskids | 

    @#22 Mannie

    If the plane is forced to take emergency maneuvers, clothing can easily be flung about the cabin and essentially become ballistic objects. It isn’t common, especially in larger aircraft, but it’s definitely a possibility.

    IMO, that’s enough justification to ban them during taxiing, takeoff, and landing. If you can’t be without your clothes for a few minutes, you’re a loser.

    I’d fly the friendly skies more often. Or maybe not.

    @ Pork Donuts – what’s with the caption under the photo? LeBron James tells his Chinese fans about the wonders of high fructose corn syrup (Feng Li/ Getty).

  26. #26 |  Radley Balko | 

    If the plane is forced to take emergency maneuvers, loose electronic devices can easily be flung about the cabin and essentially become ballistic objects. It isn’t common, especially in larger aircraft, but it’s definitely a possibility.

    So how common does it need to be for them to ban it? There are lots of things that could happen. Loose objects can also become dangerous if a plane encounters turbulence in flight. In fact, a woman was killed several years ago by a beverage cart when a plane went through some nasty turbulence.

  27. #27 |  Juice | 

    http://www.npr.org/2012/03/21/148606249/confronting-the-vp-may-be-impolite-is-it-a-crime

    The court is about to decide if a man should go to prison for criticizing Dick Cheney.

  28. #28 |  Brandon | 

    “Brandon — you can get a very limited selection of goods from Amerian Apparel, if you live near a store or go through the trouble of buying clothes online. But if you shop at the mall like everybody else, forget it. You’ve got one source for clothing: China.”

    You could’ve just said ‘Brandon – You are correct.’ You have the choice NOT to go to the mall; you can still (for the moment) purchase clothing anywhere you want in this country, and there are many companies that aren’t American Apparel that sell Made-in-America clothes. But again, you don’t care about that, you just want to be self-righteous without having to be inconvenienced in any way, regardless of what it may cost anyone else. You’re a fucking dime-a-dozen troll without any original thought or actual solutions to the “problems” you’ve been told to care about. Read some fucking books, and shut up until you’ve actually got something to contribute.

  29. #29 |  Kit Smith | 

    @Radley – Not sure how common it has to be, this was just the point I picked up in discussing the issue with some professional pilots that I know – they said that it was most common to experience the kinds of maneuvers requiring rapid changes in altitude, heading, and speed during the take-off and landing phase of the flight, and that’s why the ban from taxi to 10k feet was there.

    I also thought it was common practice to stow the beverage cart during rough turbulence for that very reason, but I’m not exactly an expert in safety practices of the airline industry. For these kinds of safety reasons, though, I would hope that flight crews are given the authority to mandate the stowing of all carry-on items including non-electronic devices if they believe the turbulence they’re about to encounter should warrant it. I’d rather be inconvenienced than dead. It’s a hard line to define by way of regulation, which is why I’d let the flight crew use its judgement in those cases, though.

    @ Arseen – True, but that is why they ask you to turn off and stow your electronic items during taxi and take-off. Ever tried just turning off your laptop but keeping it in your lap? The flight crew will be all over you to put it away already.

  30. #30 |  Lorenzo | 

    Juice, I say let Dick Cheney handle it his way — take the guy on a “hunting trip.”

  31. #31 |  Bernard | 

    The rent control thing is even more absurd than the Reason article suggests to an outsider. The analysis of the laws is spot on, but it gives a $1000 a month apartment that’s only 3 or 4 times below actual market rate. To get an idea the things which are out there, here’s a $55 per month one-bedroom apartment in prime Manhattan:

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2012/03/18/soho_apartment_rents_for_55month_may_be_cheapest_in_city.php

    The article also mentions a $322 4 bedroom apartment in the West Village (at least $6000 or more at market rate).

    It’s absurd.

  32. #32 |  Ben | 

    @Kit – They’ve never once asked me to put away books during takeoff, landing and taxiing, and some of those are heavy than my laptop, especially the hardcover ones. A hardcover book is just a dangerous to be flying around the cabin as a laptop.

  33. #33 |  Dante | 

    “I’d submit that if you’re so terrified of dogs that you think you were “forced” to kill a boxer puppy and pregnant chihuahua, maybe you aren’t cut out to be a police officer. ”

    Police officer? If you think killing a puppy is anything but evil, you aren’t cut out to be a HUMAN!

    Protect & Serve (Themselves!)

  34. #34 |  Kit Smith | 

    @Ben – Yeah, I know, it’s not exactly a particularly consistent policy if they’re not changing an antiquated electronics policy due to the safety reasons.

  35. #35 |  omar | 

    You’re a fucking dime-a-dozen troll without any original thought or actual solutions to the “problems” you’ve been told to care about. Read some fucking books, and shut up until you’ve actually got something to contribute.

    Whoa doggy. He made a counterpoint to your point and din’t make it about you. Chill.

  36. #36 |  El Scorcho | 

    Here is a quote from comments on the article about the puppycide –

    Burke Peltier · Colorado Technical University
    This happens too often to be considered justified. After reading similar story after similar story and seeing videos of dogs being shot by the police, my suspicion is that this is part of the training an officer receives or part of what he learns quickly in the field. It is not the threat that the dog could physically overwhelm a well-built, heavily armed cop. It is the fact that a dog will simply not shutup and follow a cops orders. The police M.O. is to take complete control of the scene and barking dogs can cause the officers to be distracted and we know that they are always on edge and always in fear of the general public. So killing the dog in front of its owner will serve two purposes: one, get rid of the distraction and two, gain complete compliance from the owner who will be likely be in fear of being next.

  37. #37 |  Brian | 

    Re The Oregonian editor: at least he died doing what he loved.

  38. #38 |  Brandon | 

    What counterpoint? “you can get a very limited selection of goods from Amerian Apparel, if you live near a store or go through the trouble of buying clothes online. But if you shop at the mall like everybody else, forget it. You’ve got one source for clothing: China.”
    Where is there a point in that waste of space? No one is forcing you to go to the mall, “everybody else” doesn’t get their clothes from the mall, there are stores at most malls that sell “Made in America” clothes; That wasn’t a counterpoint, it was an empty, stupid evasion. Most people, if they buy clothes made in China, apparently prefer the prices, style, quality, or something else about those clothes to American-made ones. If you don’t, vote with your wallet and buy American. Complaining about other peoples’ choices “forcing” you to buy Chinese is either empty whining or a setup to suggest forcing other people to adhere to your preferences.

  39. #39 |  JSL | 

    From the siding case: “Asked Mitch, “What did you accomplish other than wasting the city’s money, the county’s money, our money, and then all the mental and emotional anguish? What did you accomplish?””

    They accomplished their goal of asserting that you are their slave. Land of the free, home of the brave indeed.

    Re Oregonian: Once again proving how corrupt they are.

  40. #40 |  marco73 | 

    Well if you live in the snooty Hamptons, you can go to jail if you don’t trim your bushes:
    http://realestate.msn.com/blogs/listedblogpost.aspx?post=ebce02fe-c9e2-438b-9c1f-31a303815a70

  41. #41 |  The Late Andy Rooney | 

    Does that apply to eyebrows as well?

  42. #42 |  EBL | 

    This is not exactly a victory, but it is a small step in the right direction. Kudos for the court in ruling 9-0 on it. Of course real justice would be putting EPA and Corps of Engineering officials in stocks and pelting them with potatoes.

  43. #43 |  EBL | 

    I was kidding about putting aluminum siding on a home being an actual crime above (just in case anyone missed the nuance). That is merely a crime against good taste.

    But those county officials and the judge should be driven out of office by the good citizens of Minnesota.

  44. #44 |  Jack Dunphy's Evil Twin | 

    Report: When a Dutch boy reported sexual abuse by Catholic priests in the 1950s, the church had him castrated. There were at least nine other castrations.

    Vote for Rick Santorum!

  45. #45 |  Linda | 

    Puppycide- I would really like to know what is considered a “charge”. Because it seems in many of these incidences it seems the dog is shot because he/she “charged”. I am begining to think “charge” is a word used to describe something with a tail that happens to be breathing.

  46. #46 |  Brian | 

    Not to be crude but let’s face it, cops shoot dogs for the same reason dogs lick their balls: because they can. Think about it, for most cops the only shooting they ever get to do is in a shooting range. All that training and and all that preparation and yet they never get to actually unholster their gun and rip off a few rounds for real. I’m sure they’d like to in many circumstances, but as many things as they get away with, routinely gunning down people isn’t yet one of them — or at least there is still a substantial risk to that. But with a dog? They know they’re free to blast away at the slightest provocation and so they do. As long as there is simply no consequence whatsoever for shooting something, you can expect cops will shoot it. All they need is a pretense and almost every dog will give them one by simply doing what dogs do when strangers (especially aggressive strangers) enter their home.

  47. #47 |  Leon Wolfeson | 

    Yes, it’s SO terrible the peasants can live in the city, without needing to travel for hours to get to their job. Oh, and once more lol@ your lack of willingness to actually tackle code problems, for instance by stopping egregious codes in the first place.

    You get what you want, very much so.

  48. #48 |  rmv | 

    @46 Leon Wolfeson

    One of the first things you learn in an Intro Economics class is that price ceilings make the quantity demanded exceed quantity supplied. If quantity demanded is higher than quantity supplied you have a shortage. So, yes, there may be the marginal non-affluent tenant on the upper east or in the village, but you also price out even more non-affluent types to make up for subsidizing the very lucky few. Also, this analysis does not take into account that most who benefit from rent control are not the “peasants”

    There’s an overwhelming amount of theoretical and empirical evidence that price controls are destructive.

    When you say code problems are you talking about the issues that come from zoning laws? If not, are you referring to standards of upkeep by landlords?

  49. #49 |  croaker | 

    Albany blues man Ernie Williams passes on tonight.

    http://www.timesunion.com/local/article/Bluesman-Ernie-Williams-dies-3425487.php

  50. #50 |  Belle Waring | 

    Radley, I love you, but I have terrible migraines which mean I have very brief access to the internet each day, which I naturally spend here, getting kicked in the (metaphorical) balls by depressing posts about cops shooting boxer mixes. But where’s the Trayvon? I figured you’d be all over that like white on rice? Or perhaps some less racially-charged food metaphor, such as: like pale yellow on a mixture of arroz con pollo (which is not a race according to the US census) and white rice. I’m hoping you’re researching for some amazing revelations. Otherwise…WTF?*
    *she complained, about the free ice cream, demanding free sprinkles, and free whipped cream, and real cherries that had been soaked in kirsch instead of those awful red things, and some homemade butterscotch sauce would go down nicely. Also, in the flavors I demand. More mint-chocolate-chip, but chocolate sauce to go with that. And more free ice cream. Thank you.

  51. #51 |  Leon Wolfeson | 

    @47 – And that matters to essential workers like nurses who have to do long shifts and three-hour commutes because?

    More, everyone needs to live somewhere. Your “evidence” that rich people occasionally can’t get quite the view they want? Bluntly, aww. Also, there are large developments in many EU countries which are rent-controlled, it’s not a few people.

    (Although the right are trying to dismantle them and then looking surprised when communities break down and they end up with riots)

    And I mean every little place being able to write batshit coding laws is a problem. The UK system is so different there’s no real comparator, I admit – the minute-rule-based approach you have isn’t used here.

    (If you make a significant change to a building something not covered by planning permission here, unless it’s a safety issue or you defaced a historical listed building, you’ll need to un-do it before you can sell it…)

  52. #52 |  rmv | 

    @49 Leon Wolfeson

    WTF? Are you truly that thick? Did you not read or just not understand what I typed? To break it down a little further:
    —In a housing shortage situation like new york city where partial rent control pushes prices of non-rent control housing above equilibirum, those who are most able afford it(the rich people) can pay above equilibrium prices for better housing.

    —In a housing shortage situation like new york city where partial rent control pushes prices of non-rent control housing above equilibirum, those who are least able to afford it(the poor people) are stuck with the shit end of housing stick if they aren’t one of the very few lucky enough to be in a rent control situation(they’ll be further away and be forced to pay higher prices).

    —Most of those who ARE in rent control situations are not the poor and destitute or even middle class. Most of those who ARE in rent control situations are on the higher end of the income/wealth distribution. Why are you defending the forced redistribution of resources away from one subset of society(generally poorer) to another subset of society(generally richer)?

    Do you truly not understand supply and demand? Graphs like the following are in EVERY INTRO ECON BOOK whether written by Krugman or Mankiw or Alchian:
    http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_otfwl2zc6Qc/R59D_8eiskI/AAAAAAAADf4/LVEPY0V0XjI/s1600-h/qd.bmp
    Market distortions like price control(whether ceilings or floors) hurts the less well off(poor people) disproportionately more than the better off(rich people). Learn basic economic principles before you start spouting off nonsense.

    Yes coding and zoning laws are definitely market distortions. I think we can agree, at least. There are certain cities in America that have incredibly restrictive and nonsensical zoning laws. Depending on which city, trying to get a shed built in your backyard can take months.

  53. #53 |  rmv | 

    Socialist Economist(Yes, even socialist economists understand the effects of rent control) Assar Lindbeck said, “In many cases rent control appears to be the most efficient technique presently known to destroy a city—except for bombing it.”

    Nobel Laureate Gunnar Myrdal(also of Swedish Labor Party Fame): “Rent control has in certain Western countries constituted, maybe, the worst example of poor planning by governments lacking courage and vision.”

    First sentence in a column by another left-liberal nobel laureate Paul Krugman: “That great sacred cow– Rent Control– is a textbook case of Economic stupidity”
    http://www.pkarchive.org/column/6700.html

    I don’t think adding conservative, libertarian, or anarcho-capitalist economists is necessary, is it?

  54. #54 |  TC | 

    Just incase you missed it.

    http://iowntheworld.com/blog/?p=125537

  55. #55 |  Homeboy | 

    Brandon –

    “What counterpoint? “you can get a very limited selection of goods from Amerian Apparel, if you live near a store or go through the trouble of buying clothes online. But if you shop at the mall like everybody else, forget it. You’ve got one source for clothing: China.”
    Where is there a point in that…?”

    I count at least two. I think Omar’s suggestion is a good one; you should just chill.

  56. #56 |  Homeboy | 

    That comment by Burke Peltier on puppycide shows a depth of insight that nearly defines him as a genius.

  57. #57 |  Dunmore | 

    My friend’s brother is a cop here in Wilmington, DE. He told me that cops here shoot dogs whenever they want a few days off.

  58. #58 |  Personanongrata | 

    Mitch and his wife Jean say it all began back in 2007 when they received a letter from the city of Burnsville saying, in part, “you must complete the siding of your home.”

    Woudn’t it be wonderful if everyday folks could leverage the coercive power of the state and force others into paying to complete your unfinished home improvement projects.

    Asked Mitch, “What did you accomplish other than wasting the city’s money, the county’s money, our money, and then all the mental and emotional anguish? What did you accomplish?”

    The answer is clear, what was accomplished is that Mitch was used as an example as to what can happen if you fail to obey adminsitrative decree(s).

    You are to do as you are told like the good citizen serf you are and never question “officials” when they levy a decree against you or your property.

  59. #59 |  Leon Wolfeson | 

    rmv -Oh yes, because stopping blatent ripoff pricing for poor people is the same as the Blitz, which literally destroyed much of London.

    No, that’s called reason to be called an idiot in public, nothing else.

    Moreover, the concept that in a housing shortage, there are not major constraints placed upon people trying to rent? Is a complete falsehood. Many American cities have expansion room which European cities simply don’t, for instance.

    I would rent-control *everywhere*. On a far more flexible scale than most systems currently allow – including major reductions for not having basic measures (offered by the energy companies at no cost to householders) to increase energy efficiency. Moreover, I strongly support council housing (and in areas with sufficient of that, rent control can be relaxed – which isn’t currently the case in much of England).

    And of course you then need to slap a swinging tax on unoccupied housing and empty brownfield sites. You’re trying, again, to compare a broken system to one designed to actually take into account adverse factors.

    Sweden, incidentally, has a significant amount of public housing, and strongly supports people on low incomes and who lose their jobs for reasonable periods, so homelessness isn’t a major issue.

    Compare that to the UK, where it’s up 900% in the last year alone (from a near non-existant level) thanks to government policy, the amount of social housing has plummeted over the last thirty years and said new government policy is going to force around two million households per year to move for the next 6-8 years. Around 85% of those will involve a job loss.

    So yes, I think rent control’s better than that until the situation can be fixed by building social housing.

  60. #60 |  rmv | 

    @ Leon Wolfeson

    You’ve never taken a single economics class, have you?

  61. #61 |  Leon Wolfeson | 

    @60 – So… basically your rebuttal is “social cleansing good”.

    Thanks for demonstrating your evil, but the sane people can’t formulate policy based on that.

  62. #62 |  markm | 

    @61 – Doubling down on ignorance and stupidity.

  63. #63 |  Leon Wolfeson | 

    @62 – You haven’t posted a single rebuttal except “I LOVE SOCIAL CLEANSING, LOOK AT ME”.

    Try actually arguing with the *issues*. Of course, as I said, that would require you’re not a rabid corporatist, like so many so-called Libertarians.

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