Lunch Links

Thursday, February 9th, 2012
Digg it |  reddit |  del.icio.us |  Fark

57 Responses to “Lunch Links”

  1. #1 |  Robert | 

    “The updated rules now prohibit “any person to cast, toss, throw, kick or roll” any object other than a beach ball or volleyball “upon or over any beach” between Memorial Day and Labor Day.”

    “Hey, toss me my suntan lotion willya?”

    “I’m sorry Ma’am, but that’s a 1000 dollar fine. Pay up. Also, I see your kid has dug a hole measured at 18.5 inches deep. That’s another 1000 bucks.”

  2. #2 |  BamBam | 

    santorum ……..

  3. #3 |  Pablo | 

    A terrorist attack in rural Tennessee? These people have completely lost their minds. Looks like some budget cuts are in order. Then again, it was probly a lot of free stuff the feds dumped into their laps under the rubric of “homeland security.”

  4. #4 |  Cyto | 

    This is Hemingway’s best fisking. A task made particularly easy by the “fact-check” admission that the statement in question was “technically correct”. But it counts as a big fat lie because they don’t think it is all that relevant. There’s a word for that….. Hubris.

  5. #5 |  tarran | 

    Everybody knows that technically correct is the best kind of correct!

  6. #6 |  Yizmo Gizmo | 

    “•You will soon be fined $1000 for throwing a Frisbee or football on the beach in L.A. County.”

    Kind of expensive. Er, what’s the fine for smearing the car of any such Hitler youth ticket-writer’s car with bat guano?
    If it’s under $500, and no one’s looking, I’m down for it.

  7. #7 |  Mark Kimsey | 

    “It’s insane,” Balko counters. “No terrorists are going to attack rural Tennessee. It’s just not going to happen.”

    And you, sir, are going to guarantee that? Unless, of course, properly armed, and trained, LE groups are scaring them off, maybe?

    From the article, “SWAT teams are a perfectly legitimate use of force when you’re using violence to defuse an already violent situation,” says Balko, who in a 2006 research paper argued that botched police raids are the rule, not the exception, putting both civilians’ and officers’ lives at unnecessary risk.”

    I’d sure like to see the data proving that ‘botched raids are the rule,not the exception’. Care to share that research with the readers?

  8. #8 |  DoubleU | 

    #1 Robert
    Have you ever know cops to be that polite while beating and pepper spraying the the suspect?

  9. #9 |  Les | 

    And you, sir, are going to guarantee that? Unless, of course, properly armed, and trained, LE groups are scaring them off, maybe?

    You are arguing that every small town in the U.S. needs a SWAT team.

    There is as much evidence to prove that terrorists are being scared away from rural Tennessee by anti-terror prayers spoken by children at bedtime as there is to support the idea that SWAT teams are the cause.

  10. #10 |  omar | 

    Mark Kimsey,

    Is my sarcasm meter not working? If not, your first statement is hereby nominated for the early 2012 stupid comment award.

    As for your second comment, Google is your friend:

    http://www.cato.org/pub_display.php?pub_id=6476

  11. #11 |  Mike Leatherwood | 

    Terrorists must use frisbees.

  12. #12 |  JSL | 

    Ultimate frisbee, the ultimate game of terrorists.

  13. #13 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    “the ten hottest homophobes on the Internet.”

    Well, THAT was a let down.

  14. #14 |  Radley Balko | 

    From the article, “SWAT teams are a perfectly legitimate use of force when you’re using violence to defuse an already violent situation,” says Balko, who in a 2006 research paper argued that botched police raids are the rule, not the exception, putting both civilians’ and officers’ lives at unnecessary risk.”

    I’d sure like to see the data proving that ‘botched raids are the rule,not the exception’. Care to share that research with the readers?

    Yikes. I didn’t pick up on that the first time I read the piece. He’s paraphrasing here, but I have no idea what he’s paraphrasing. I didn’t say it in the interview, and it doesn’t say that anywhere in the paper.

    I’ll send him an email asking him to correct it. It isn’t even close to true.

  15. #15 |  C. S. P. Schofield | 

    Maybe I’m off base, but I think that calling people you dislike, or who dislike you, ‘Homophobe’ is about as useful a furtherance of mutual understanding as calling somebody ‘homo’.

    Don’t see the ‘Hot’, for that matter, but I’m straight, so I wouldn’t.

  16. #16 |  BamBam | 

    And you, sir, are going to guarantee that? Unless, of course, properly armed, and trained, LE groups are scaring them off, maybe?

    Are you scared of your shadow? Do you ever leave your house? What if a meteor falls on your house? Do you live underground? What if an earthquake occurs and the seismic activity destroys your underground abode? Do you still sleep with night lights on?

    Some people want a complete police state. Fellate The State!

  17. #17 |  C. S. P. Schofield | 

    Beaches in LA county are pretty goddamned crowded, or were when I was nine (I’m fifty now) and I doubt it’s gotten better. Throwing a frisbee or football in those conditions strikes me as fundamentally bad judgement, likely to result in bonking somebody briskly on the noggin. That could be cast as ‘assault’, so a $1000 fine doesn’t seem so far out of line.

    The problem, of course, is that instead of requiring people to use good judgement, and ejecting, fining, and/or arresting the ones that don’t, this law will inevitably be used to bag people who AREN’T being nitwits. But I think I can see where the reasoning started.

  18. #18 |  Mark Kimsey | 

    “40,000 per year by one estimate?” And Radley, et al, can give us 40 to 50 ‘Bad one’ examples a year?

    “It isn’t even close to true.” Correct. How ’bout we see that as the “Agitator Misleading Headline of The Day” tomorrow. Wonder how long it will take to correct this bald faced lie, attributed to Mr. Balko, at the Nashville Scene?

    @omar: “If not, your first statement is hereby nominated for the early 2012 stupid comment award.”

    Really, omar, you are going to guarantee that, too?

    You gonna nominate my second factual statement (heretofore proven absolutely correct by the source himself) for an award?

    Never fear, I archived it here (http://sceniccity.proboards.com/index.cgi?action=display&board=police&thread=29500&page=1#256510). When they correct it, I will.

  19. #19 |  Mark Kimsey | 

    Radley? Omar? Cat got your tongue, keyboard and pencil?

  20. #20 |  Chris Mallory | 

    Mark, I have an Anti-Tiger stone I can sell you. I swear it works. I have never been attacked by a tiger. I am sure it does more to repel tigers than all your trained SWAT teams do to keep terrorists out of rural Tennessee.

  21. #21 |  Lint | 

    I expected Santorum to be the surprise Number 1.

  22. #22 |  M. Steve | 

    @19

    Yeah, Radley, 45 minutes is way too long to wait for a response to a blog comment. Mark Kimsey has some hot homophobes to pick up, he can’t wait around all day!

  23. #23 |  Radley Balko | 

    And Radley, et al, can give us 40 to 50 ‘Bad one’ examples a year?

    Check the archives of this blog.

    How ’bout we see that as the “Agitator Misleading Headline of The Day” tomorrow.

    Given that it wasn’t a headline, I’m going to say no.

    Wonder how long it will take to correct this bald faced lie, attributed to Mr. Balko, at the Nashville Scene?

    I highly doubt the author intended to mislead anyone. So I also doubt it was a “bald faced lie.” But yes, it was inaccurate. My guess is that he misheard or misinterpreted when I told him that the vast majority of SWAT raids are to serve drug warrants, and that in my opinion that’s an inappropriate use of SWAT teams. But “inappropriate” does not mean “botched.”

    I don’t know how long it will take to correct it. I don’t work there. I did send him an email requesting the change. In the forum at your link, you say that I “promise to correct it.” I can’t promise any such thing. I don’t write for the Scene. I can only promise to ask them for a correction. Which I have done.

    As for a terrorist attack in rural Tennessee, no I don’t think it’s ever going to happen. Even if it were to happen, the only way a SWAT team would help is if there were an extended, Mumbai-style attack. A SWAT team isn’t of much use if someone sets off a couple bombs, or walks into a restaurant, shoots the place up, then leaves or kills himself. It takes a good 20-30 minutes to get a SWAT team to the scene. (Which is why citing Virginia Tech isn’t all that convincing.)

    And despite the fact that the SWAT commander cites VA Tech, Columbine and terrorist attacks, I’ll bet you a dollar that its primary function is to serve warrants on people suspected of drug crimes.

    I’m done posting now. Not because I have no answers to your criticisms, but because I’m going to eat dinner. And watch the IU game. And walk my dog.

  24. #24 |  Mark Kimsey | 

    @Chris Mallory: What does a great golfer have to do with this conversation? Seems somebody has been keeping all the ‘terrorists’ (We do a pretty good job of growing our own here) out of rural Tennessee. Please share with us the part you’ve played to repel bad folks from Tennessee (Besides paying your taxes!)

    @ M. Steve: Picking up hot homophobes? What’s your number? I’ll see what I can do. And, M. Steve, it’s been over an hour. That’d be 3599 seconds more than Radley, et al, expects us to correctly perceive, decide and react. While he, and you, sit back (safe, thanks to LE) in your ivory towers.

  25. #25 |  Marty | 

    after reading the frisbee article, I realized we’re doing it all wrong as parents. I’m going to implement a permit process for the kids- tv permits, frisbee permits, bonfire permits, video game permits, etc.

    it will really help prepare them for their futures.

  26. #26 |  Mark Kimsey | 

    “I highly doubt the author intended to mislead anyone.”

    So, if any reasonable person, based on what he/she knew, or reasonably perceived, at the exact time of the decision they made (during the entire time they had to make that life or death decision) should be ‘intended’ to be cool, no matter the outcome?

    The ends justify the means (or not), is what you are saying? I hope not, or I will think less of you.

    “And despite the fact that the SWAT commander cites VA Tech, Columbine and terrorist attacks, I’ll bet you a dollar that its primary function is to serve warrants on people suspected of drug crimes.”

    I’ll take that bet, Radley. Prove me wrong, and I’ll buy you a beer next time I am in Nashville. (Seriously)

    “I’m done posting now. Not because I have no answers to your criticisms, but because I’m going to eat dinner. And watch the IU game. And walk my dog.”

    Despite the fact you have no answers to my legitimate questions, nor will you be able to factually challenge them (in this instance), I’ll give you that.

    Eat, watch the game and walk your dog. The evening shift, jack-booted MNPD thugs, got your back, no matter what you think of them! I bet it will be a peaceful and non-terrorist involved night. (Salut!)

    You’re welcome, (On behalf of my brothers and sisters up there).

    Keep doing what you do and we’ll keep doing what we do, under the law.

    Our ‘facts’ are judged by the courts, on reasonable doubt, and yours are judged by……………?

  27. #27 |  Mark Kimsey | 

    And, Radley, thanks for all the ‘reads’ on the CMF Police Blotter you just inspired!

  28. #28 |  Mark Kimsey | 

    “Check the archives of this blog.”

    I did. I do.

    I read it every day.

    That’s were I got the adjudicated 40 to 50 ‘Bad one’ examples a year thing.

    “40,000 per year by one estimate?” I’ll even give you (Although unsupportable with facts) an even 1,000 bad ones and you are still at 2.5%. That means there are 97.5% SWAT raids, each year, that went the right way, based on an extreme, unreasonable exaggeration of your numbers.

    If this over-the-top number of bad things is the case, we have a better average than Babe Ruth and any other Hall-of-Famer, in any sport. (And they pay us a lot less!)

    Are you disputing your own numbers, now? Or, did you accidentally misquote yourself, in the heat of the moment? Or mishear it? Or misinterpret it? Or misintend it?

  29. #29 |  Ted S. | 

    I hate how the Weekly Standard not only runs all its articles to multiple pages, forcing you to click through to more ads — but they also put the link to the single-page version in an image-only form so that you have to have images turned on find the link.

    (I surf a lot of sites I don’t normally go to with only cached images set to show: I’ve got limited bandwidth and there are a lot of sites that have an obnoxious number of ads or images related to the antisocial networking widgets that they slow the browser down.)

  30. #30 |  Les | 

    Mark, you haven’t yet explained why you believe that every small town in America needs a SWAT team to keep terrorists away.

  31. #31 |  bacchys | 

    @ Mark Kinsey- I suppose that depends on what you mean by “went the right way.”

    Kicking in someone’s door when there wasn’t any particular reason to kick it in isn’t “went the right way” in my book even if the door was the correct one, the suspect/s was the intended target/s, and the suspected contraband turned out to actually be there.

    Sending troops…er, paramilitarized cops to roust Salvatore Culosi wasn’t the right thing to do even if all the i’s were dotted ad the t’s were crossed on the warrant. Sending troops…er, paramilitarized cops to assault the home of Jose Guerena when there was ZERO evidence to support an expectation of a violent response by him to a more civilly served warrant wasn’t the right thing to do.

    You can argue all you want that most SWAT raids “went the right way,” but the fact is you don’t have a clue. No one is tracking them, and law enforcement agencies across the country are unfortunately fighting efforts to track them. It took a bungled SWAT raid on the mayor of a small Maryland town to overcome the resistance of Maryland law enforcement agencies to tracking SWAT raids in Maryland, and I don’t know of any other state that’s tracking any such data.

  32. #32 |  Diligence | 

    “You will soon be fined $1000 for throwing a Frisbee or football on the beach in L.A. County”? Nope. Turns out the whole thing was wrong on the part of CBS. The ban isn’t new–it’s been around since 1970, and the new ordinance was actually designed to make it easier to play on the beach. Plus, the $1,000 fine simply does not exist. If you’re throwing things on the beach and are causing a disturbance, and you’ve already been warned by a lifeguard, you can be fined $100. Big news, right? Read this: at http://rentfoodbroke.com/bum-around/read-something/la-bans-frisbees-or-does-it.html

  33. #33 |  bacchys | 

    My apologies. I misspelled Kimsey.

  34. #34 |  Radley Balko | 

    Mark:

    Yes, a very small percentage of SWAT raids are “botched.” I’m not disputing this.

    That doesn’t mean serving drug warrant with a SWAT team is appropriate, even when everything goes to plan. If you were to start using SWAT teams on people who haven’t paid their parking tickets, that wouldn’t be an appropriate use of force, even if every raid went according to plan.

    And with 40-50K raids per year, even a tiny percentage going wrong means quite a few people having the living hell scared out of them, possibly injured or–a couple times per year–killed.

  35. #35 |  C. S. P. Schofield | 

    Follow on to Mr. Balko’s point in #34;

    Also, if the tactics of SWAT teams today were tried on our ancestors from, say, 1900, there would be a lot of shot cops, and holy hell would be raised by the common citizens … and not on behalf of the cops.

    We have drifted, in the name of Lawr ‘n Owda, from the idea that the authorities needed to present a householder with a written warrant, in a respectful manner, to the widely held (at least among Cops) notion that kicking in doors over non-violent crimes is acceptable.

    Our forefathers would spit on us.

  36. #36 |  The Court Jester | 

    So Sgt. Kimsey, you come here to parse the words of an article that was neither written nor edited by Radley Balko as an attempt to discredit him. You offer nothing in the way of facts to discredit what Mr. Balko has to say in his own writings concerning the modern state of policing, just mere blather and oh so witty ripostes. I suggest you return to your duties as a Traffic Division Sergeant for the Hamilton County, TN Sheriff’s Department and leave the thinking to those who are not so hopelessly compromised and biased. “Sir, I’m going to need you to stand back. I am attempting to measure these skid marks. Do not make me use my Taser.” Ha Ha.

    http://www.accidentreconstruction.com/members/cv/kimseyMark.pdf

  37. #37 |  Windy | 

    Mr. Kimsey comes off (just like all too many cops and an even higher percentage of SWAT cops) as a real ass, who thinks everything he does “in the line of duty” is of real value and is the correct response, no matter how unconstitutional these actions truly are or how many innocent people and dogs are injured or killed in those raids. This is the attitude that must change if law enforcement and the citizenry are to ever again have a mutual respect for each other instead of the “us vs them” situation we now have in this country.

    As things are now, I have respect only for a few LEOs — Sheriff Mack, the LEO members of LEAP, the LEO members of the Oath Keepers, and a local Deputy who ran for Sheriff and was beat out by our current (and corrupt) Sheriff via lots of money for ads, his cozy relationship with the prosecutor and businessmen who wrote many LTEs on behalf of the current Sheriff, and some very dirty tricks (like hiding his opponent’s signs with his own larger signs, or pulling the opponent’s signs out and throwing them in ditches, throughout the campaign, and somehow “persuading” the local news sources to not do interviews with or stories on either candidate). The local voters were not given a chance to get to know the Deputy or his proposed policies and therefore they voted for the Sheriff they already knew.

    Wouldn’t it be nice if candidates stopped with the dirty tricks and the media stopped the blackouts of coverage of good candidates?

  38. #38 |  Matthew F | 

    Fortunately, the $1,000 Beach Fine is not true:

    http://news.yahoo.com/frisbee-beach-ban-overblown-los-angeles-officials-002505081.html

    The new changes are actually a loosening of 40-year old restrictions:

    In fact the original law, which dates to 1970, makes it an infraction to “cast, toss, throw, kick or roll” anything other than a beach ball on a Los Angeles County beach — a rule that may have escaped the notice of many Southern Californians.

    The revised ordinance, which was given final approval by supervisors on Tuesday, allows beach balls and volleyballs — and loosens restrictions on footballs, Frisbees and other such sporting equipment and toys.

    The ban now applies only during summer and lets beachgoers toss their footballs and Frisbees in designated areas, over the water or with permission from a lifeguard.

  39. #39 |  Nancy Lebovitz | 

    #35 | C. S. P. Schofield

    That may be wishful thinking. Black people in the south certainly couldn’t expect or enforce decent treatment from the police, but I have no idea what standard practice was otherwise. Anyone have information?

  40. #40 |  a_random_guy | 

    “That doesn’t mean serving drug warrant with a SWAT team is appropriate”

    This. SWAT teams are appropriate for exactly one kind of situation: one where innocent lives are in immediate danger. Hostage situations, someone firing a weapon as people, that kind of thing.

    In any other situation, there are better ways to deal with things. Rule number one: serve a warrant by knocking on the door like a civilized human being. If no one answers, and you are 100% certain they are at home and have yeard you, then you may have the option of breaking the door down. If the people are major dealers, they aren’t going to be able flush a whole marijuana plantation down the toilet in those few minutes.

    That still doesn’t take a SWAT team. If you’re worried the people are armed and dangerous, nab them when they go out to the grocery store. Cut off their utilities and wait until they get thirsty, cold or hungry. Etc.

  41. #41 |  Mike T | 

    In other words, someone who throws a football on a beach in LA is going to suffer more economic harm than a police officer who negligently shoots an innocent person but is exonerated because he followed department policy.

  42. #42 |  H. Rearden | 

    I assume that Mr. Kimsey is a LEO and perhaps a member of a SWAT Team. He claims that the mere presence of a ‘properly armed, and trained, LE groups are scaring them (terrorists) off’. He also asserts that the primary role of SWAT is not to serve drug warrants.

    Mr. Kimsey, please inform me of the community that has been overrun by terrorists because of the lack of a ‘properly armed, and trained, LE groups are scaring them (terrorists) off’. (That question, of course, is rhetorical. We all know that there is no such community).

    On a serious note, would you tell me what LE functions your SWAT team performs? Does it serve drug warrants? Does it serve them in the ‘shock and awe’ manner that we have come to expect that it is performed? I’m sure that you train for all types of situations, but what other LE functions does the SWAT team actually get called out to perform? Are the officers that comprise the SWAT team dedicated to the team, or do they also serve as routine LE functions. Is the SWAT team funded by federal funds? Does the SWAT team obtain funds using asset forfeiture and do you think that it has any perverse affects on the motivations of officers?

    I am trying to participate in an honest discussion. If you truly read this blog on a regular basis, I’m sure that you are aware of the perception of the inappropriate use of SWAT teams, the inappropriate use of force by regular LEOs, and the double standards that seem to be evident from the courts when is comes to these issues. Would you care to address any of these perceptions?

  43. #43 |  DarkEFang | 

    Something that nobody ever discusses is what happens in the aftermath of a SWAT-style raid on a house.

    These attacks often take place in areas with high crime rates. If police come through, smashing down doors and breaking windows, how often do the residents return – after having no charges filed against them – to find their homes looted and possessions destroyed, either by the police or by burglars who find the home an easy target.

    Then you have harm to reputations. Being thrown in jail for a day or two can cost people their careers if they handle sensitive information or finances, even if no charges are ever filed. People employed in service industries may be fired for missing a shift or two, no matter what the reason is for their absence. And wrong-door raids can still show up whenever people have background checks run on them for jobs, loans, etc.

  44. #44 |  omar | 

    Omar? Cat got your tongue, keyboard and pencil?

    Whoa, sorry doggy. I was away from my computer for the 45 minutes you were furiously hitting refresh.

    I didn’t say your second statement was dumb – I implied that you were lazy. Sorry for the confusion.

  45. #45 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    Just read all the comments. Why is the word “butt hurt” echoing in my head?

  46. #46 |  Big A | 

    I don’t care what Mark Kimsey’s title is- he is a cop. This is what makes his comments difficult to decipher from those of a reactionary, my-color-will-always-be-better-than-your-color, partisan troll. Just once, can an officer who comments on here and disagrees with Radley be a thoughtful, well spoken, professional individual?

  47. #47 |  zendingo | 

    @46, no.

  48. #48 |  Mark Kimsey | 

    Here are my comments on the whole thing. Just so I don’t have to re-type the whole thing…..

    http://sceniccity.proboards.com/index.cgi?action=display&board=police&thread=29500&page=1

  49. #49 |  Mark Kimsey | 

    “I don’t care what Mark Kimsey’s title is- he is a cop. This is what makes his comments difficult to decipher from those of a reactionary, my-color-will-always-be-better-than-your-color, partisan troll. Just once, can an officer who comments on here and disagrees with Radley be a thoughtful, well spoken, professional individual?”

    I tried to be well spoken.

  50. #50 |  Mark Kimsey | 

    “I implied that you were lazy.”

    You got me.

  51. #51 |  Mark Kimsey | 

    “I assume that Mr. Kimsey is a LEO and perhaps a member of a SWAT Team.”

    LEO? Yes.

    Member of the SWAT Team? No.

    “Mr. Kimsey, please inform me of the community that has been overrun by terrorists because of the lack of a ‘properly armed, and trained, LE groups are scaring them (terrorists) off’.”

    I can’t inform you of that. Thankfully, ‘properly armed, and trained, LE groups’ are present and therefore, no community “has been overrun by terrorists.”

    Pretty simple math, here.

  52. #52 |  Mark Kimsey | 

    “This is what makes his comments difficult to decipher from those of a reactionary, my-color-will-always-be-better-than-your-color, partisan troll.”

    You don’t know my ‘color’ and therefore your statement is inherently racist.

    I’m cool with the “partisan troll” thing, though.

  53. #53 |  Mark Kimsey | 

    “Mr. Kimsey comes off (just like all too many cops and an even higher percentage of SWAT cops) as a real ass.”

    I’ll cop to the ‘real ass’ thing.

    I deny begin a part of the Sit, Wait And Talk folks.

    Radley will have to speak to that.

  54. #54 |  Mark Kimsey | 

    “Fortunately, the $1,000 Beach Fine is not true”

    Whoa! Radley posted, proliferated, threw gas on and proffered something that was not true?

    Say it ain’t so!

  55. #55 |  Les | 

    Mark, you haven’t yet explained why you believe that every rural town in America needs a SWAT team to protect it from terrorists.

    Also, could you give a sample of the “pretty simple math” that demonstrates how having SWAT teams have prevented terrorist attacks in rural towns?

    Why do you think terrorists haven’t attacked all the rural towns in America that don’t have SWAT teams?

    Finally, considering that terrorists are obviously not interested in attacking unprotected small towns, why are you so very frightened of terrorists?

  56. #56 |  H. Rearden | 

    Pretty simple math, here.

    Obviously, math is not your strong suit.

    How can you believe that the presence of ‘properly armed, and trained, LE groups’ prevent terrorist activity when the thought of arrest or punishment is not a deterrent to a terrorist? I’m sure it’s a mixture of both, but do you think that LE’s function is more to prevent crime or investigate crime after it has occurred?

  57. #57 |  c andrew | 

    Mr. Kimsey’s displayed attitude here is excellent evidence of why LEO’s of all stripes should be stripped of their qualified immunity. If they were subject to the same laws and consequences as the rest of us, perhaps they might be capable of understanding the difference between an error in transcription in an article that was corrected and the actual harm done to citizens by police officers acting in illegitimately in their use of force.

    I find it interesting that Mr. Kimsey is outraged beyond reason by the first and blase’ about the incidences of the second. This all indicates that he thinks that he is the rightful member of a privileged class and that their actions are all beyond reproach but anything critical of those actions is beyond the pale.

    The old French aristocracy had a better grasp on proportionality and morality than their modern incarnation, the Law Enforcement Officer.

Leave a Reply