“Stop resisting, motherfucker.”

Wednesday, February 8th, 2012

Here is what you’re seeing:

A Highway Patrol trooper enters the scene first, gun drawn, and kicks the driver’s window of Greene’s four-door sedan. After several moments, the trooper opens the door.

The trooper, his gun still raised, then gives Greene conflicting commands. He first tells him not to move, then tells him to come forward.

A second trooper quickly cuffs Greene’s wrist and pulls him from the car, which rolls forward until an officer stops it.

Greene flops to the ground, clearly dazed as five officers rush him. A sixth officer, with Henderson police, enters the frame late and delivers five well-placed kicks to Greene’s face.

“Stop resisting mother (expletive)!” one officer yells.

Greene doesn’t scream until a second Henderson officer knees him in the midsection — and then does it three more times. Greene was later treated for fractured ribs.

Police suspected Greene was intoxicated as he weaved among lanes about 4 a.m. on Oct. 29, 2010, and finally stopped his car near Lake Mead Parkway and Boulder Highway in Henderson.

But that wasn’t the case, which they soon discovered after they searched Greene.

“Call in medical,” one officer says in the video. “We found some insulin in his pocket. … He’s semiconscious.”

“Let’s get medical out here. He’s a diabetic, he’s probably in shock,” the officer later tells dispatch.

Greene’s lawsuit said officers then forced him to stand by a patrol car in handcuffs and blow into a Breathalyzer, despite being injured. Paramedics later arrived and treated him for low blood sugar.

Greene was released without a citation, and officers apologized to him for “beating him up,” the lawsuit said.

He immediately went to a hospital, where he was treated for the broken ribs and the bruises to his hands, neck, face and scalp, the lawsuit said.

One of the harsher moments in the video comes near the end of the clip, when one officer can be heard laughing loudly.

One officer notes that Greene “was not a small guy.” An officer laughs and says, “I couldn’t take him by myself.”

Several points:

  • This certainly isn’t the first time cops have mistaken diabetic shock for intoxication—and with similar results. We’ve also seen a number of incidents where cops have mistaken epileptic seizures for aggressive behavior, often resulting in a Tasering. The root problem here is the same as that with the cops who mistakenly mistake a bounding or territorial dog with an aggressive one, and then kill it. The cops get excused because they made “honest mistakes.” (Though in this case, the honest mistake ended with mistaking low blood sugar for intoxication.)  But that means they haven’t been trained properly. At some point, enough of these stories should have made the news that departments across the country would begin to implement such training. That doesn’t appear to be happening.
  • Note that at one point in the video, after they’ve just beaten a helpless man, one cop asks his fellow officers if any of them are hurt.
  • Not only were none of these cops criminally charged, every one of them is apparently still protecting and serving the public. The story indicates one seargeant was “disciplined,” but we aren’t allowed to know what that discipline was. The department also claims to have changed some policies in response to the incident. But we aren’t allowed to know exactly what those changes are, either.
  • We also aren’t allowed to know the names of any of the officers in the video. This is inexcusable. It seems pretty clear that there’s a culture problem, here. Mistaking a diabetic for a drunk is bad enough. Beating him senseless when he clearly posed no threat is criminal. And yelling “Stop Resisting!” at a man who is clearly not resisting is indicative of a police culture in which excessive force is common enough that the officers know what to say as they’re beating someone to give them cover later. Laughing after you’ve just beaten a man, and after you’ve just discovered he was a diabetic is straight-up pathological. All of which means there’s plenty of reason to doubt this particular department’s internal review process. These officers names need to be released, so journalists and police watchdog groups outside of law enforcement can look into their histories on the job.
  • Greene and his family were given a $292,500 settlement, which of course will be funded by taxpayers, not the cops who beat him senseless. This too needs to change. The cops who beat green should be forfeiting a portion of their paychecks to him for the rest of their lives. And those paychecks should preferably be compensation for work other than police work.

 

MORE: Digby runs off a few other incidents in which police Tasered diabetics after wrongly assuming they were intoxicated.

Digg it |  reddit |  del.icio.us |  Fark

65 Responses to ““Stop resisting, motherfucker.””

  1. #1 |  (B)oscoH | 

    The only bright side to this story is that Sklar Brothers fans can yell, “Henderson!”. Just terrible.

  2. #2 |  NL_ | 

    Libertarian sidenote: blood glucose testing was really pushed forward in the 1960s or so by expensive testing machines. The idea was to help hospitals differentiate between drunks and diabetics based on glucose levels. The drunk could be ignored but the diabetic might be suffering hypoglycemia. Only doctors were allowed to purchase the testers.

    Some people tried to get the meters sold to the public, since they are not that complicated. Most informed diabetics tight blood sugar control avoids all the negative health consequences of diabetes. Regular testing teaches diabetics what to eat to avoid spiking blood sugar (spoiler alert: carbs bad; fat good).

    The medical establishment, including the device makers, were opposed to letting patients having direct access to this information without the assistance of doctors. But eventually the guardianship idea failed, especially with the importance to Type I diabetics of immediate feedback for bolus insulin (a food-supplementing fast-acting insulin that is now the standard treatment for Type I but is incredibly difficult without patient-operated meters). Now testing meters are available at basically any Walgreens or CVS and there are regular TV commercials for them.

  3. #3 |  terrence | 

    Another PIG obscenity – these are becoming all to common. They make ALL LEOs look bad – I am coming to think that most, if NOT ALL, LEOs are PIGs, sociopathic PIGS

  4. #4 |  C. S. P. Schofield | 

    I have a project for the SETI people; get the law changed so that the settlements from this kind of incident comes out of Police Union coffers. The screams of outrage will be clearly audible over a three or four galaxy radius……

  5. #5 |  bigjohn756 | 

    I cannot understand why policemen stay in their jobs when they are obviously terrified of everybody and everything they encounter in their work day. So many of them beat, Taser, or shoot their victims with no real provocation that it seems to me that their actions must be triggered by fear or, maybe, lack of self-confidence. Aren’t there some tests that a person must pass to qualify of the job?

  6. #6 |  StrangeOne | 

    They’re not terrified John, they feign terror because “officer safety” is the canard they have to throw out to justify beating innocent people.

    Clearly they have no qualms about rushing a man weapons drawn, beating him mercilessly two on one while he is handcuffed, and then laughing about their “mistake”. That’s not them being afraid, that’s a psychopath who pretends to be terrified because he has learned that other people let him be a psychopath when he does it.

  7. #7 |  Whim | 

    #5 bigjohn756:

    At this juncture, I think there is enough evidence that whatever psychological testing is administered to prospective police recruits results in psychologically UNSUITABLE, UNSTABLE, and DEMENTED sociopaths being routinely hired.

    Couple that with immensively strong police unions, and Qualified Immunity for acts of evil perpetrated on the public, and brother to we ever have a problem.

    Has to be the root cause: They are simply hiring sociopaths to unleash on an unarmed and unsuspecting public.

    To control us.

    It is a common mantra for the police to chant “Stop Resisting, Stop Resisting” to compliant, non-resistant, non-violent arrestees.

  8. #8 |  Jack Dempsey | 

    I feel safer.

  9. #9 |  Thom | 

    But Radley, don’t you know about all the horrible things they have to deal with on a day to day basis? They are on the front lines! You can’t expect them to follow the same rules as polite society!

  10. #10 |  Jay | 

    Radley, where is the link to the original article on this? Ah, nevermind, I’ll post it myself: http://www.lvrj.com/news/video-shows-officers-beating-motorist-in-diabetic-shock-138901274.html

  11. #11 |  Curt | 

    Two additional points:

    1. They started off as overly aggressive. Then, they clearly switched into panic mode when the car started rolling forward after they dragged the guy out. I can’t imagine that I would’ve put my car in park when a guy with a gun was yelling at me telling me not to move. He also certainly wasn’t given any opportunity to point out that the car wasn’t in park.

    2. They actually demonstrate a brilliant technique on the “Stop Resisting” portion. A mob of cops swarms the guy. One cop grabs his arm and pulls in one direction. Another cop grabs that arm and pulls in the other direction. Both feel someone pulling against them so they both yell “Stop Resisting”. It seems to be a pretty common tactic in videos like this.

  12. #12 |  kant | 

    At some point, enough of these stories should have made the news that departments across the country would begin to implement such training. That doesn’t appear to be happening.

    Unless there’s actual repercussions to these actions, there is no incentive to change.

    Beating him senseless when he clearly posed no threat is criminal.

    I disagree. even if he was drunk, even if he was a belligerent drunk, with half a dozen cops standing over him while he’s on the ground and giving him a rodney-king-style beating is ALWAYS criminal in my view.

    And yelling “Stop Resisting!” at a man who is clearly not resisting is indicative of a police culture in which excessive force is common enough that the officers know what to say as they’re beating someone to give them cover later.

    does anyone else instinctively thing south park when ever a cop says “stop resisting?

    http://vodpod.com/watch/1130005-its-coming-right-for-us-clips-south-park-studios

  13. #13 |  Jack Dunphy's Evil Twin | 

    We should wait for all the facts before rushing to judgement. Clearly this man provoked these fine law enforcement officers. They are protecting us, we should be grateful. Greene should be glad he wasn’t shot; if it were me I’d have shot him.

  14. #14 |  kant | 

    By repercussions I mean repercussions that directly affect the offending department/officer.

    also thing = think. typos haunt my posts.

  15. #15 |  Mike Leatherwood | 

    New policy implemented:

    “Turn the ‘effn cameras off”

    Problem solved.

  16. #16 |  nigmalg | 

    Now imagine if this diabetic gentleman was your father or other close family member.

  17. #17 |  Pablo | 

    Every time I see something like this I lose more respect for law enforcement officers, and Im a boring, middle class, middle aged white guy. I suspect I’m not alone in this.

    Each one of these incidents deflates the “just a few bad apples” argument. If most cops are good then why do they just stand by and do nothing when a handcuffed man is kicked and kneed in the ribs? Why don’t the “good cops” see to it that these thugs are fired and prosecuted?

  18. #18 |  Len | 

    It may be, but it was not clear who stopped the car? He stopped the car at which point the police approached? Or they put the lights on and he stopped in response to that? It’s important in that if he had already stopped, then the aggressive initial actions were certainly wrong, which means everything afterward didn’t have to happen.

  19. #19 |  horseydeucey | 

    #16, right there with you.
    The “bad apples” defense is so weak, it’s not even funny. Has there ever been any report… ever… of a PD weeding out their “bad apples” without public evidence, or outside investigating?
    In order for the BAD (bad apples defense) to work, every PD needs a bad apples department with outside members, monitors, and auditors.
    That is, if the PD’s are at all concerned about keeping the bad apples from spoiling the whole institution.
    Which they aren’t.

  20. #20 |  horseydeucey | 

    … or #17…

  21. #21 |  CSD | 

    “The cops who beat green should be forfeiting a portion of their paychecks to him for the rest of their lives. And those paychecks should preferably be compensation for work other than police work.”

    Why shouldn’t the cops should be criminally charged.

  22. #22 |  CSD | 

    It does appear to me that at the 2:24 mark of the video the officer that had what I assume is the insulin pen seemed to look into the air at disgust at what just happened. He also appears to be the same officer that was near the suspects head while the other officer was kicking. It looks like he may have moved into a position to stop the kicking. Throughout the video his actions do not appear excessive. I can’t tell what he was saying but he appeared to maintain some level of compassion and professionalism during this arrest.

    This incident was escalated for no reason and poorly handled but it was handled differently to some degree by those involved. The initial officer with his gun drawn should not be in a position to carry a firearm.

  23. #23 |  Goober | 

    It does appear to me that at the 2:24 mark of the video the officer that had what I assume is the insulin pen seemed to look into the air at disgust at what just happened.

    In any other circumstance, if he saw any other person beating the crap out of another person for no justifiable reason, he’d have pulled his gun and arrested them on the spot. Why is it any different when his co-workers do the same?

    Throughout the video his actions do not appear excessive. I can’t tell what he was saying but he appeared to maintain some level of compassion and professionalism during this arrest.

    He will lie and cover up for his buddies, mark my words. he already did when he didn’t arrest them on the spot for assault and battery. You seem to be praising this man because he didn’t join in and beat the hell out of somebody – that’s sort of what i would expect a normal human to do. I have never beaten the hell out of anybody – where’s my praise?

  24. #24 |  skootercat | 

    One officer notes that Greene “was not a small guy.” An officer laughs and says, “I couldn’t take him by myself.”

    I didn’t hear that. He said at 3:36 “…right, I could have taken him by myself.”

    He was the same officer that approached the vehicle, with gun drawn, and put his foot on the window shouting two different commands. I bet he practiced that move in front of a mirror. He’s probably a hell of a hood diver (T.J. Hooker style).

  25. #25 |  Whim | 

    The Blue Wall of Silence of the police guild regarding reporting wrongdoing of their fellow police officers is much stronger than the Omerta of the Mafia.

  26. #26 |  BamBam | 

    “Aren’t there some tests that a person must pass to qualify of the job?”

    Yes there are, and they passed them with flying colors because this is what The State wants – thugs to terrify Citizen Nothing to quell any uprising. Unfortunately it works to a large degree, but the numbers of us who are not fearful is growing.

  27. #27 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    Not only were none of these cops criminally charged, every one of them is apparently still protecting and serving the public. The story indicates one seargeant was “disciplined,” but we aren’t allowed to know what that discipline was. The department also claims to have changed some policies in response to the incident. But we aren’t allowed to know exactly what those changes are, either.

    This happens at our local police commission meetings which are open to the public…like this:
    1. “We can’t tell you that”
    2. “We don’t have that info, so we’ll investigate” (never provides answer)
    3. “………” (this is silence when the commission just refuses to answer
    4. “We can’t tell you what the result of the investigation was, how we investigated, what the punishment was, who was punished, or why we can’t tell you.”
    5. “Submit your questions in writing” (never provides answer)
    6. “Your 5 minutes are up” (we can go back to ignoring you)
    7. “You’re out of order…” for asking why we haven’t answered your questions you submitted in writing months ago.

    Luckily, we are seeing a nation-wide awakening to this shit that is uniting peasants across all categories. I’m not saying “justice will be served”, because that would result in thousands of cops ending up in prison serving lengthy sentences. And, people usually wake up and decide on some pretty stupid solutions.

  28. #28 |  paranoiastrksdp | 

    Luckily what the state says were allowed and what we can actually do about this are two different matters.

    Dox the fucking bastards.

  29. #29 |  CSD | 

    #23 Goober

    “…he appeared to maintain some level of compassion and professionalism during this arrest.”

    This assessment is relative.

    My option is based on the video presented to me as evidence. That is all I am commenting on. I try to access the facts available to me and make observations based on those. If you have some more information concerning this investigation or concerning the officer I have evaluated please feel free to share them. At that point I will be happy to revise my assessment.

  30. #30 |  croaker | 

    Asshole #1 is Sgt. Brett Seekatz, a Henderson officer since 2002.

  31. #31 |  primus | 

    Why did he settle for so little? I would be suing LARGE. Until the awards surpass the insurance limit, the city won’t notice. Sue for ten mill plus legals and get their attention.

  32. #32 |  primus | 

    The problem is at the top, not with the rank and file officers. They are set loose by their ‘superior’ officers, who are charged with ensuring that they are properly selected and trained and that their training and procedures they are to follow are appropriate. If they are poor choices for officer, it is the selectors, who are superior officers, who are at fault. If they are poorly trained, it is their trainers, who are superior officers who are at fault. If the training is inappropriate, it was designed by those same superior officers, and if the procedures are faulty, it is because the superior officers did not do their jobs when they were devised. If the ‘superiors’ did their jobs as they should, this type of thing would very rarely happen, and the cops wouldn’t look like thugs and goons without a brain in their heads.

  33. #33 |  Joe Bar | 

    So, if the guy WAS drunk, it’s OK to beat him up?

    Just askin. I have duty this weekend.

  34. #34 |  John | 

    “#17 | Pablo | February 8th, 2012 at 5:57 pm

    Every time I see something like this I lose more respect for law enforcement officers, and Im a boring, middle class, middle aged white guy. I suspect I’m not alone in this.”

    Yeah. I agree from another boring, middle class, middle aged white guy. (That sounds like my wife’s description of me.)

    John

    p.s. Here’s a story from Tacoma, Wash., about a cop stealing about $120K from the families of 4 dead cops. Whatever happened to honor among thieves?

  35. #35 |  John | 

    Well, here’s the story: http://www.komonews.com/news/local/Lakewood-cop-accused-of-embezzling-120k-from-Fallen-Officers-Fund-138957974.html

  36. #36 |  Mary | 

    I’m totally against drunk driving, but I still don’t see why it should matter if he’s a diabetic or drunk. He shouldn’t be treated this way because he’s a human being. If he did something wrong, that doesn’t make it right to go in for a few kicks while he’s obviously down. The whole thing disgusts me. I actually couldn’t believe what I was seeing when the cop walked up with his gun drawn and tried to kick the window in. Why would weaving in the road require that level of force?

    It’s unfortunate, but cops just make me sick. I would trust a friend with a gun to protect me any day over a cop. I will always pause before calling the police and consider if I really want to invite them into a situation. It’s likely that they’ll show up late, destroy my property, and treat me like a criminal even if I’m the victim. Power corrupts.

  37. #37 |  CSD | 

    I just noticed along with stopping the car the driver also appears to unlock his car door so that the police could open it.

  38. #38 |  C.E. | 

    Every time I hear cops yelling “Stop resisting!”–which they seem to do every time they beat someone senseless–I can’t help but think of some kid’s older brother telling him, “Stop hitting yourself” as he slaps his younger brother with his brother’s own hand.

  39. #39 |  Ben Fenton | 

    I think that we should realize that these things have been and are happening daily and profusely in poor neighborhoods and urban areas, and when we treat incidents like these as an exception or an outrage it puts our privilege on full display. This stuff is a daily reality for millions. We’re lucky not to be faced with that. That’s just my perspective.

  40. #40 |  Andrew_H | 

    There was an instance in Ozark MO where officers encountered a teen who had apparently been hit by a car and thrown over the side of an overpass which resulted in a fractured spine, a broken foot among other injuries. These animals with badges tasered the barely conscious victim over 20 times after he couldn’t get up and perform the requested tricks at the roadside. BECAUSE HE HAD A BROKEN FUCKING BACK AND HAD FALLEN FROM A FUCKING OVERPASS! They tortured him so badly that the doctors couldn’t perform the necessary surgery for two days because of the damage the electrocutions did.

    The police have long since stopped being peace officers or a friend to the public. They are nothing more than a standing army of occupation. The standing army our forefathers repeatedly warned us about.

  41. #41 |  Sinchy | 

    At the very least the cop who kicked him in the face a few times should be fired, there is never a reason to kick a person in the face, that much should be obvious to the most ardent police apologist, and certainly anyone in a leadership position on the force or in government.

  42. #42 |  Jamie | 

    Gotta inject here, though the force is totally disproportionate regardless of whether Greene was having glucose issues or ethanol ones, it can be hard to tell the difference between drunk and low blood sugar, speaking as a FF/EMT. We carry the glucose test kits on every fire and EMS piece in my county, but if the patient is combative and we can’t tell why, then we just have to kind of guess whether it’s glucose or ETOH (or, y’know, both, which happens with some of our frequent fliers). Helping a combative patient is sometimes problematic, too, especially if we didn’t get the call from the patient, but rather someone else in the house who wants help for the patient. We’ll sometimes call the sheriff’s office to get help restraining the patient, but that being said, there’s no way I’d let a deputy do to a patient of mine, regardless of his level of combativeness, what these donkeys did to Mr. Greene.

  43. #43 |  Mykeru | 

    “The cops get excused because they made “honest mistakes.” (Though in this case, the honest mistake ended with mistaking low blood sugar for intoxication.) But that means they haven’t been trained properly.”

    Radley,

    I may be a cynical bastard, but I have to disagree with the idea that this sort of behavior is necessarily a result of poor training. It might be, but I also assume cops are trained how to serve warrants and often abandon any protocol in order to take the most aggressive stance possible to convince themselves, and us, of the overwhelming danger of their jobs.

    In the face of real danger, more often than not cops will hang back and wait, as with the response to Columbine or “establish a perimeter” while women and children get raped and killed, as with the Cheshire, Connecticut, home invasion murders. Since many cops recognize they have this “get home no matter what attitude” pants-pissing attitude that expresses itself as pure cowardice when it really matters, the random bouncing puppy has to stand in as a proxy for the danger that they are unwilling to face.

    What police seem to do is play this game of treating things as dangerous, but only after having established the lack of real danger. Real danger creates not over-reaction like this, but complete inaction on the part of police.

    When I see a bunch of cops pummel the hell out of an unresponsive diabetic in shock like this, I realize what I am watching is really a form of theater.

    What I can’t quite figure out is whether the cops are playing it for our benefit or for each other.

  44. #44 |  Steve | 

    The officers names should be released, sure, but since they were not, reporters should find them and report on what kind of officers on their own. And they make a stink of this and not report press releases as if they were news. Everyone in establishment is letting the other folks down. There is an opportunity for news orgs that do old timey investigations to make a big splash. They are leaving it to the internets to do it and are getting let in the dust.

    If these cops were ‘following procedure’ then the culture should be changed, with transparency. If they were not following procedure, then they should be sued personally and criminally charged.

  45. #45 |  VikingMoose | 

    #17 | Pablo |

    “Why don’t the “good cops” see to it that these thugs are fired and prosecuted?”

    excellent call – totally right!

    cuz the alleged “good cops” don’t get promoted?

    Be a cop! where shit rises to the top!

    #24 Skooter – awesome TJ Hooker reference. well done! let’s hit a 240 Robert or Adam 12 (or whatever that was) next time :)

    maybe the “he was too big to take down myself” style of comment is also a justification?

    isn’t another cop bullshit dodge saying, “are you resisting a legal order by a law officer” (even when it’s actually not within their legally-assigned duties)?

    fuck this. dammit.

    WHO WILL START DRINKING FOR ME?

  46. #46 |  just a libertarian cop treading water | 

    This is police culture in a nutshell.
    Everything you see in this video IS a product of the training, and socialization within it.
    It is easy to say that the problem is top down, but the reality is that you ain’t gonna get a beatdown by a Chief.
    Its coming from the rank and file, and it is not only accepted, it is encouraged.
    From Day 1.
    I have been in the game for 20+ years, and I can tell you, that nothing will change until immunity is taken away.
    Even when big events happen that cause repercussions, then end result is not less of these incidents.
    The organism goes into circled wagons mode, throws out the “bad apples” line, figures out what the new rules will be, then games the system til it happens again.
    The rule enforcers, are also the rule makers, and they have immunity.
    They are covered and they know it.
    Dont veer too far outside the circle of protection, and you will be protected.
    What you see is the product of that security.
    Its not even a matter of hiring psychopaths.
    Most folks, given a free pass from consequences, will behave similarly.
    History shows this to be true.
    Remove immunity, problem reduced exponentially.
    “Training” is a band-aid.
    They WILL game the system.
    Because they can.

  47. #47 |  Pablo | 

    #46 just a libertarian cop–very good post. It raises the question of why and how average people can do evil things. Some people are able to ignore external incentives and social pressures to do the right thing, even when that is costly to them. Others do evil acts because that is how the external incentives are rigged–“because they can” as you put it.

  48. #48 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    figures out what the new rules will be, then games the system til it happens again.

    Describes everything about the state you need to know.

  49. #49 |  Cyto | 

    There’s absolutely no excuse for the failure of the DA to prosecute the face-kicking thug. There is no circumstance leading up to that moment that could possibly render those actions less than criminal battery. Even if he were to claim the victim was resisting arrest, he was clearly under the control of other officers at the moment of the assault.

    In murder cases the “premeditation” required for first degree murder can happen in the pause between the first shot fired in self defense and the second shot fired a few seconds later. This face-kicking officer was never in any personal danger, was not involved in the arrest and the victim was completely in custody at the time of the assault (albeit for only a few moments).

    The guy who jumps on his back is clearly guilty of excessive force as well. The amount of “resistance” offered by the victim is beyond minimal… it appears to be entirely related to confusion as to what “on the ground” means. After all, the guy is lying on his side on the ground when one officer pulls him to his knees. While on his knees on the ground they keep yelling “get on the ground”. 5 seconds later they force him violently to the ground while holding his arms such that he cannot catch himself. They then jump on his back with as much force as they can muster, clearly not merely in order to gain control but in order to mete out punishment. This results in broken ribs. This is felony assault or mayhem depending on your jurisdiction.

    “Take him out on the wrist lock” is a clear indication that they never had any intention of worrying about whether the driver was going to comply or resist. They were going to assault him regardless of his actions. You can hear just how amped up on adrenalin they are by their breathing. Gun-boy is huffing and puffing like he ran a marathon and he wasn’t involved in the wrestling match.

    The people who are paid to hold these “public servants” to account should be out of a job. The fact that our citizenry continues to continence police chiefs, prosecutors, mayors, councilmen and judges who do not hold them to account is depressing and a little terrifying.

  50. #50 |  Charlie O | 

    I’m amazed they all didn’t start shooting when the car started to roll.

  51. #51 |  Dante | 

    #46 Libertarian cop:

    Thank you for confirming what we all knew to be true – the police set their own rules, routinely break their own rules, cover up the violations, stonewall any outside inquiries and move on to the next citizen.

    Just one part you left out, if I may add it: They enjoy this tremendously.

    Protect & Serve (Themselves!)

  52. #52 |  arglebargle | 

    The comments on the story here at agitator, and the comments on the story over at policeone are shockingly similar.

    Did Hell freeze over?

  53. #53 |  Lorenzo | 

    #50, a trial is coming up in my little town where police killed an unarmed man in a Tahoe that was rolling — or perhaps it’s more accurate to say it was being driven. Either way, he’s dead.
    http://amarillo.com/news/local-news/2012-01-28-0

  54. #54 |  Personanongrata | 

    Very professional, Justice Scalia would be proud.

  55. #55 |  croaker | 

    @54 I would like to put Scalia in a dark cell, handcuff his fat ass to a chair, tape open his eyes, and spend the next 24 hours making him watch video clips like this.

  56. #56 |  MN LEO | 

    Mr. Blako, I usually agree with what you have to say about police actions, but I think you’ve got some mistakes here.

    First, (and I realize this is from the story you linked, but you didn’t correct the author…) the “conflicting commands” weren’t conflicting at all. The original contact officer ordered Greene to not move, then asked another officer to come forward to perform the vehicle extraction.

    Second, your comment regarding the failure to distinguish intoxication from a diabetic reaction as being a result of improper training is way off-base. A diabetic with out-of-whack blood sugar can easily be mistaken for an intoxicated individual. Just yesterday I saw a man attended to by EMS and even they had to do a blood sugar test and a PBT to see whether he was intoxicated, had low blood sugar, or both. If EMS can’t do it without tests, how do you expect an officer to distinguish between the two on the spot, with mere moments to decide whether an individual is drunk and a threat or diabetic and in need of insulin (and still possibly a threat)?

    This is not to excuse what the officers did in the video after they started dogpiling Greene (everything up to the dogpile I can easily see as reasonable, without information to the contrary); the strikes to the head were clearly excessive, and the knees to the ribs were likely excessive also. I’m just saying your first point is invalid.

  57. #57 |  MN LEO | 

    ***I meant “Mr. Balko”…***

  58. #58 |  albatross | 

    I’m in the same boat as Pablo–a middle-aged married white guy with kids.

    One thing I wish we had is a denominator. It’s a big country, and there are lots of cops and lots of traffic stops. We don’t know how many of those cops or stops aren’t abusive. I would like to have good numbers on how prevelant this sort of thing is. Does anyone have a link or reference to someone trying to get a handle on this?

    As things are going now, the endpoint is that middle class white people like me end up with about the same attitude about the police as poor urban blacks. This will make police work way harder, and crime easier and more common. I wish I saw a way for this not to happen.

  59. #59 |  Vain Beggar | 

    And those paychecks should preferably be compensation for work other than police work.

    They’ll just go on welfare then. Shit, they basically are already.

  60. #60 |  Russ 2000 | 

    If someone says “Stop Resisting, motherfucker” and I don’t fuck my mother, should I continue to resist? Or should I stop resisting thereby falsely confessing to having fucked my mother?

  61. #61 |  John C. Randolph | 

    If the bosses of this criminal organization aren’t willing to deal with the problem, it’s up to the public to vote their asses out.

    -jcr

  62. #62 |  Militant Libertarian » ‘Stop resisting, motherfucker.’ | 

    […] Posted: February 12th, 2012 by Militant Libertarian The Agitator […]

  63. #63 |  Combaticus | 

    “What, do you want to beat ‘em up? Go ahead. Get down. Protect and serve, brother.” —Alonzo Harris, “Training Day”

  64. #64 |  Hugo Williams | 

    Why does the cause of the erratic behaviour matter? Drunk or diabetic, he wasn’t a threat.

  65. #65 |  John David Galt | 

    Ultimately, the police work for us. It’s time for all of us to write our state and city legislators and demand they stop this kind of behavior, and make police who do it fully answerable for their actions. Then any incumbent who disagrees or dissembles in his reply needs to lose his job.

    Once we have legislatures that will do their job our way, then we can start purging the police department of those who won’t.

Leave a Reply