Morning Links

Thursday, December 1st, 2011
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39 Responses to “Morning Links”

  1. #1 |  Difster | 

    Why oh why couldn’t that be “Dog shoots cop?”

  2. #2 |  Elliot | 

    @Difster you beat me to it!

  3. #3 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    Queue “righteous indignation” by Congress at Fed loans. The king of RI (barney frank) will go out with a bang.

  4. #4 |  Difster | 

    Balko,

    You’re focusing on symptoms and not problems related to illegal immigration. While Florida’s law seems kind of stupid, the real problem with illegal immigration lies with the incentives for them to come here. We have to remove the incentives and the problem will take care of itself.

    In this case, get rid of state run colleges.

    In other cases where property owners aren’t allowed to discriminate, repeal laws that prevent freedom of association. Why shouldn’t a private property owner be able to discriminate against whomever he wants in renting out his property?

    Granted the way states are trying to remove some of the incentives seems a little backwards, there is only so much they can do it seems because the 10th Amendment has been shredded so badly.

  5. #5 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    My dream is to have 4chan content read into the Congressional record during a fillibuster. Pedobear is the best thing since Evil Burt turned up on OBL posters in Pakistan.

  6. #6 |  Jozef | 

    It’s not just the Pedobear. I’ve seen many cultists trying to identify each other by a stylized fish bumper sticker. You should watch out for them as well and report all suspicious activity.

  7. #7 |  Highway | 

    How dumb do you have to be to think that child predators are going to advertise they are such by pasting Pedobear on their car, or wearing a costume?

    Oh wait, it’s a politician.

  8. #8 |  Radley Balko | 

    In other cases where property owners aren’t allowed to discriminate, repeal laws that prevent freedom of association. Why shouldn’t a private property owner be able to discriminate against whomever he wants in renting out his property?

    I don’t believe there are any laws requiring landlords to rent to illegal immigrants.

    And the incentive that lures them here is jobs, not state benefits. Evidence for this: Illegal immigration has all but stopped since the economy tanked.

  9. #9 |  Yizmo Gizmo | 

    “In his affidavit for warrant to search D.C. head shops, a cop cites copies of Flex Your Rights videos as evidence of criminal activity.”

    Yesterday it was informing jurors about their rights that was
    illegal, today it’s videos advising people about their rights.
    Tomorrow possession of the US Constitution will be enough to get you sent
    to Thoughtcrime Prison…http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2ZV_kQh048

  10. #10 |  David | 

    Careful, Radley. That’s just going to lead to the Tea Party calling for the elimination of all jobs. It’s the only way to keep our borders safe!

  11. #11 |  Difster | 

    I don’t believe there are any laws requiring landlords to rent to illegal immigrants.

    Not requiring to rent to them, but prohibiting discrimination based on legal status.

    And the incentive that lures them here is jobs, not state benefits. Evidence for this: Illegal immigration has all but stopped since the economy tanked.
    You don’t think state benefits are part of the incentive that go along with the jobs? Have you spent any time at all in California? Have you ever seen immigrant rallies demanding more benefits for illegals? I have. The state benefits are most definitely part of the overall incentive package; it’s not JUST the jobs.

  12. #12 |  Loretta Nall | 

    Yesterday, here in my home state of Alabama, a Japanese auto executive working on assignment at the Honda plant in Lincoln, Al was ticketed under the new immigration law for not having an Alabama drivers license. He did have a passport and an international driver’s license. He was perfectly within bounds of the law as an Alabama license isn’t a requirement under the idiotic anti-immigration law. Last week a German auto executive was arrested in Tuscaloosa because he left “his papers” in his hotel room.

    The people who passed the law are ignorant buffoons and apparently the ones tasked with enforcing it are even more ignorant and buffoonish.

    In short, it would be exceedingly difficult if not downright impossible to out-stupid Alabama on the immigration law and damn near anything else.

  13. #13 |  Marty | 

    we had legal immigrants up and leave because they were intimidated by crackdowns on illegals. we had 2 nicely-performing rentals suddenly empty because of these stupid laws. to go from positive cash flow to no cash flow and 2 mortgages will make your head spin.

  14. #14 |  BamBam | 

    “Congress was unaware of $7.7 trillion the Fed handed out to banks before the TARP vote.” The real number is over 14 trillion and growing. I’m sure most in Congress were fully aware of the facts. And if they weren’t it is irrelevant because their actions are clearly immoral if one is willing to be honest about it.

  15. #15 |  Franklin Harris | 

    “Florida out-stupids Arizona and Alabama in concocting new anti-immigrant laws.”

    I assure you, the Alabama Legislature will not let Florida have an advantage here for long. It can out-stupid anyone.

  16. #16 |  Lucy Steigerwald | 

    A journalist could go their whole live without a hede or a lede as beautiful as the dog shoots man story’s.

  17. #17 |  BenB | 

    Am I the only one who sees the secret fed loans as being a bigger threat to national security than Libya, Syria, and Iran?

  18. #18 |  Jake Boone | 

    @Difster:

    I suspect that attendees at “immigrant rallies” aren’t particularly representative of the immigrant population as a whole.

  19. #19 |  Difster | 

    @Jake,

    I don’t know about other parts of the country, but illegal immigrants, especially in the Los Angeles area have a very twisted sense of entitlement when it comes to the money of American taxpayers.

  20. #20 |  Doubleu | 

    And the incentive that lures them here is jobs, not state benefits. Evidence for this: Illegal immigration has all but stopped since the economy tanked

    As someone who lived in Florida I disagree. They love the benefits, the free health care and free childcare. They love working under the table so they don’t have to pay taxes.
    When all the Haitians came over after the earthquake, the state was only too glad to get them hooked up to the system of entitlements and freebees. Potential voters keep the “correct” people in power.

  21. #21 |  johnl | 

    Two men take guns out on a boat, one of them gets shot, and a dog is blamed. Don’t believe it.

  22. #22 |  Michael Chaney | 

    It’s not a problem here in TN, and we have plenty of illegals. California is a different story from what I’ve seen, but that state is a mess, anyway.

  23. #23 |  Bob Mc | 

    As a sovereign head of State, doesn’t the Pope have diplomatic immunity?

  24. #24 |  Zeph | 

    They love working under the table so they don’t have to pay taxes.

    Ya, that sounds suspiciously like the raving of the brick-and-mortar stores against online retailers. “We have to pay taxes, why shouldn’t they?”

    Odd that no one says, “They don’t have to pay taxes, why should we?”

  25. #25 |  C. S. P. Schofield | 

    OK, I missed something, so somebody please fill me in. I was under the impression that the Arizona law that had people so upset was a close duplicate of the Federal law that the Feds are declining to enforce. I don’t see that as particularly stupid. WRONG, perhaps, but as a political ploy it strikes me as moderately clever. Am I wrong about the content of the Arizona law?

    As for stupid, it seems to me that the people who claim to be trying to protect those who enter the country illegally by not enforcing the Federal Law are putting the people they claim to protect in a legal twilight zone, where they can be exploited. That strikes me as either stupid (if unintentional) or evil (if deliberate).

  26. #26 |  David | 

    The problem with the Arizona law is that it empowered local law enforcement to require proof of legal residency from anyone they suspected of being an illegal immigrant, as long as it’s in the course of an otherwise-lawful “stop, detention or arrest,” which given the leeway police get for detaining people pretty much means “whenever the cop feels like it.” Locked yourself out of the house without your wallet, and asked the police for help? And you look Hispanic? Whoops, you’re going to jail.

  27. #27 |  freedomfan | 

    BenB:

    Am I the only one who sees the secret fed loans as being a bigger threat to national security than Libya, Syria, and Iran?

    You are not the only one. It drives me crazy that so many politicians are wetting themselves that the crazy guy down the street might get a gun but they seem fairly calm about drinking a little poison every day. The poison will definitely kill them but they have total control over whether or not to stop taking the poison, even if it involves some tough choices. The crazy guy may or may not get a gun and may or may not use it, and there really isn’t a whole lot they can do about it either way. So, naturally, the political class is very worried about the thing they aren’t sure will happen and that they probably can’t change, but they have a we’ll-get-to-it-when-we-get-to-it attitude about something that absolutely will happen and that they absolutely can change.

    (And, yes, I understand that with the spending crisis, the villains are basically the politicians who can’t reign themselves in and with Iran the villain is a wacky foreigner, so it isn’t so surprising which they want to focus on.)

    As an aside, I am not the biggest Ron Paul booster, but this is one of the reasons it is so frustrating to see him (and others) written off by mainstream media and GOP talking heads because he doesn’t have what they consider to be a “serious” view of America’s role in foreign policy. My response is typically that the “acceptable” candidates don’t have a serious view on economics, so let’s start treating them like second-stringers who are only there to make the debates interesting. This news about the Fed’s secret lending should be a huge news story and the political fallout from it should be that there is one candidate who has been trying to make the Fed accountable for years and just maybe we should be paying attention to him instead of to the clowns who now say they are against bailouts but who basically went along with them when it mattered.

  28. #28 |  MH | 

    “Locked yourself out of the house without your wallet, and asked the police for help?”

    I don’t think many readers of this blog would do that. :-)

  29. #29 |  Trent McBride | 

    When the dog’s pack leader was asked about the shooting, he replied, “Proper procedure was followed. This was an isolated incident.”

  30. #30 |  Joe Bar | 

    Read any of the comments under the Pedobear article? We are doomed.

  31. #31 |  David | 

    #28: Well, yeah, but I kinda doubt many readers of this blog would ask a police officer for help if they were on fire and their choices were a cop and a guy with a flamethrower.

  32. #32 |  Leon Wolfeson | 

    @4 – Right, can’t have ANY affordable higher education. Sigh. Don’t worry, the UK is about to demonstrate the long-term economic collapse that one causes.

    @23 – Sure, that just means he wouldn’t have to pay, though, not that a ticket isn’t issued.

  33. #33 |  Cynic in New York | 

    #30

    I was surprised on how long until the ACLU was mentioned

  34. #34 |  perlhaqr | 

    My new nickname for Congress is the “Insane Clown Posse”.

    http://pjmedia.com/instapundit/132522/

    If I ever need to refer to the band again, I will use their initials, “ICP”.

  35. #35 |  Brandon | 

    Leon, you do realize that college costs don’t actually disappear just because they are hidden in state budgets, right?

  36. #36 |  marco73 | 

    @Franklin #15
    We here in Floriduh will take on Alabama’s challenge. Dammit, I’ve lived here 35 years and we’ve always been able to out stupid the other 53 states.
    We have the finest legislative minds in the state, hanging out at every bar, steak house, and whore house in Tallahassee, willing to say or do anything to keep the lobbyist money rolling in. Possibly the only other 2 cities on the planet with more stupid legislative talent are Washington and Brussels.

  37. #37 |  Pam | 

    The only other poop-throwing I’ve heard of is either people locked in mental wards or people locked in prison cells. I wonder if being locked in a cage could be the reason for throwing poop? zoo-gauckers being like prison guards and nurse Rachet?

  38. #38 |  Leon Wolfeson | 

    @35 – No, they’re in a budget, not hidden. People being able to go or not based on their family’s wealth isn’t “hidden” either.

  39. #39 |  Elliot | 

    Leon Wolfeson (#38): People being able to go or not based on their family’s wealth…

    …is perfectly acceptable in a free society. One of the benefits of working hard, saving, and planning for the future is being able to help your offspring.

    To object to that is an act of craven jealousy. It’s to demand that people who are lazy, stupid, careless with money, and carefree about the future should get the same benefits.

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