Morning Links

Friday, November 18th, 2011
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43 Responses to “Morning Links”

  1. #1 |  Nick T. | 

    Re: NFL player in prison:

    Well, it’s only fair, Rush Limbaugh served time as well.

  2. #2 |  syskill | 

    TSA staff has grown by 400 percent over the last 10 years.

    What is this I don’t even.

    It’s easy to forget, but ten years ago, the TSA didn’t exist. It was created by the Aviation and Transportation Security Act, which was signed into law on 19 November 2001, ten years ago tomorrow.

    So you could just as well say that the TSA’s staff has grown by INFINITY percent over the last ten years! Or you could just as well say nothing, because ten years doesn’t seem to be a good time frame for judging the TSA’s growth.

  3. #3 |  Mario | 

    So, the one Nigerian car-jacking kidnapper gets grabbed by the balls. The other:

    only known as Lucky, managed to escape

    As they say, if this were fiction, it would be too much.

  4. #4 |  cjp | 

    From the first article: “To do the animation, Komisaruk had the brain of one of his PhD students Nan Wise scanned by a functional magnetic resonance imaging scanner as she stimulated herself.”

    That’s quite an advisor-student relationship they have there!

  5. #5 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    Government protects NFL player from his codeine addiction by putting him in prison for six years.

    I suspect the % of people in prison who are not helped by being in prison (and they are not a DIRECT threat to anyone but themselves) is high. That ain’t what prison is for and we’re still in the dark ages in dealing with things like addiction.

    I’m still trying to figure out a valid use for prison outside of a place for the few who are a threat to harming others.

  6. #6 |  Marty | 

    re the faking it link- this brings a whole new wrinkle to what women mean when they say, ‘I want a man to love me for my mind.’

  7. #7 |  GSL | 

    Richmond, CA to show solidarity with Occupy movement by dealing another body blow to its struggling economy.

  8. #8 |  albatross | 

    Boyd:

    Rational deterrence for crimes like embezzling or insurance fraud arsons. Having been caught at either one, you’re not too likely to succeed again, but e want to deter other people from doing those things, because we probably don’t catch most people who do them.

  9. #9 |  JD | 

    The lube reminds me of a Valentine’s card by Diesel Sweeties artist R. Stevens:

    Front:
    “Our love is like a Honeybaked ham.”

    Inside:
    “Pink, salty, and unclean in the eyes of the Lord.”

  10. #10 |  Yizmo Gizmo | 

    “TSA staff has grown by 400 percent over the last 10 years.”

    And they still haven’t caught a terrorist. Can you say “Give us our money back.” I can.
    ——–
    Neuroscience:
    If the woman’s brain goes all bananas during sex, why are they still
    faking orgasm? Something’s not right here.

  11. #11 |  Rich | 

    I was expecting the link about faking it to be about Herman Cain. What neurons fire when politicians !@# us?

  12. #12 |  Maggie McNeill | 

    Regarding the first link: Considering that my faking even fools other women, I’d love to go up against the machine. ;-)

  13. #13 |  Marty | 

    and that ups the ante, Maggie! we need some more research…

  14. #14 |  C. S. P. Schofield | 

    If what Romney and his staff did is not against the law, and the article gives me the impression that it isn’t, or at least that it can be argued that it isn’t, then what we have here is proof that the man isn’t nearly as dumb as I thought he was.

    Seriously; Rather gate demonstrated that the best that can be said of the modern press is that they suffer from intellectual sloth. They won’t even do the minimal checking necessary to expose patent fraud. In that atmosphere any politician who leaves behind something like staff emails, that could easily be faked, must have a head of solid biscuit. As matters stand, when some nut claims to have emails proving that Romney is a spy for the Dragon king of Mars, Romney is in a position to say; that’s not possible, because we wiped out all email data when we left office. Therefore this MUST be a fake.

    I don’t much like Romney, but I would defend this action on the part of Obama or Jimmy Carter (both of whom I loathe).

  15. #15 |  crzybob | 

    The job of the TSA is to deter attacks on US commercial aircraft, not “catch terrorists” . Against their actual goal they have been 100% effective.

    On another note the folks at reason demonstrate again how they have no idea how things work in the real world. To wit:
    “On average, there are 30 TSA administrative personnel—21 administrative field staff and nine headquarters staff—for each of the 457 airports where TSA operates”

    According to their website Reason has 6 administrative employees out of 16 staff members. An administrative to staff ratio of 1:2.6, this compares very unfavorably to the TSA ratio of 1:4.6 –

    If any one at reason had ever worked for a real private sector firm that actually did something other than baseless punditry they would understand what real world management/administrative ratios actually are. Any rational examination of government operations will almost always find them UNDERMANAGED compared to comparable private sector orgs.

  16. #16 |  StrangeOne | 

    albatross,

    I can’t speak for Boyd but I would argue that commiting embezzeling, fraud, and arson would constitute the person being a threat to someone else. A “threat” doesn’t have to mean assault, rape, and murder. A person that demonstrates continuous disregard for the rights and property of others can indeed constitute a “threat” to society at large and their crimes often justify a prison sentance.

    I would argue against the deterance angle though. No one who premeditates a crime ever seriously considers getting caught. From the clever shady accountant to the stupid mugger who goes after his neighbor without a disguise, they all think they are going to get away with it. The insane harshness of our current laws shows that deterence has no real effect, thats why the war on drugs is a lost cause. Its almost 50 years strong and people still have demonstrated that they won’t be controlled no matter how severe a punishment the government comes up with.

  17. #17 |  StrangeOne | 

    The job of the TSA is to deter attacks on US commercial aircraft, not “catch terrorists” . Against their actual goal they have been 100% effective.

    If you actually believe that crzybob, I got a rock to sell you. It may not look like much but it keeps the tigers terrorists away.

  18. #18 |  Yizmo Gizmo | 

    “The job of the TSA is to deter attacks on US commercial aircraft, not “catch terrorists” .

    But only terrorists would strive to commit “attacks on commercial
    aircraft” so, I wonder, isn’t there a gaping hole in your logic?

  19. #19 |  Chris Rhodes | 

    The job of the TSA is to deter attacks on US commercial aircraft, not “catch terrorists” . Against their actual goal they have been 100% effective.

    That’s exactly what I tell people when they question my magic, tiger-repelling rock. No tiger attacks for 10 years and counting! I paid a few billion for it, but no price is too high when it comes to safety, right?

  20. #20 |  Matt | 

    #18:

    crzybob’s point is that the terrorists are so afraid of the TSA’s mind-blowing efficiency and efficacy that they scurried straight back to their terrorist caves/mansions and have never dared set foot in a US airport again.

    It is similar to the crystal on my desk, which elephants are terrified of. 20 years have gone by and I have had zero problems with elephants, so if you look at the crystal’s actual goal it has been 100% effective.

  21. #21 |  Joshua | 

    Tampa PD show up to an Occupy protest with a tank:

    https://twitpic.com/7fo359

  22. #22 |  B | 

    Things I learned today:

    1) I could have had a lot more fun doing my PhD in neuroscience than I did.

    2) Do not fuck with Ghanaian grandmothers.

    Good to know.

  23. #23 |  Mattocracy | 

    I’m not forced to pay for the salaries at Reason Magazine. So their staffing has no real effect on me, unlike the TSA.

  24. #24 |  albatross | 

    Actually, in the two cases we know of where people tried to board airplanes with explosives on them, the TSA didn’t stop them. It’s quite possible that they weren’t able to get their bombs to go off partly because the TSA screening made it hard for them to build an easier to use bomb and get it on the plane, though–I don’t know enough about explosives to have an opinion, and while the news networks could find such experts, they probably didn’t bother. But as far as keeping guys with explosives and evil intent off planes, TSA seems to be batting zero.

  25. #25 |  albatross | 

    Strangeone:

    I imagine someone who has once been caught embezzling money from an employer is rather unlikely to manage it again, at least in the modern world where Google and criminal backgrond checks are both common. But I would like for people who might consider embezzling money to think twice, and the threat of a punishment they care about (like a few years in jail) probably works for that.

  26. #26 |  albatross | 

    Unless you’ve got some odd kink about screwing someone in a small pipe while people drum on it with hammers, and while she tries to remain perfectly still, I think the fMRI as orgasm detection technology is unlikey to catch on widely….

  27. #27 |  Dante | 

    “The job of the TSA is to deter attacks on US commercial aircraft, not “catch terrorists” .

    Holy Cow! All this time I thought the TSA’s “mission” was to protect passengers (humans). Turns out they have the job of protecting aircraft (machinery).

    Thanks for clearing that up, crazybob.

  28. #28 |  Yizmo Gizmo | 

    TSA is also strangely concerned about people’s money and precious
    metals. Like the wayward “sobriety” checkpoint which makes 800 citations
    for seatbelts, insurance and registration and 2 DUI busts, per weekend,
    TSA spends most of its time busting people for shampoo
    violations, fingernail clippers, and shaving kits.

    Here’s the TSA-holes hassling some guy over silver coins.
    Like the Ron Paul guy with cash, same interrogation, “Is it a hobby? Where did you get them? How much are they worth?”
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ggWBEX0Fnpc

  29. #29 |  crzybob | 

    Dante – your interpretation of my remarks just reveals your stupidity, but OK, just to clear it up so that even you will understand please change the word “on” to “onboard” in my sentence.

    Its obvious that you can’t stop a determined terrorist 100%, but what you can do is make the terrorist modify his techniques so that they are less convienent, more expensive and less likely to succeed. These things will result in fewer attempted attacks and fewer succesful attacks.

    The two TSA attacks mentioned are illustrative: Both men originated from airports outside the US-(possibly because they believed they were less likely to be detected) this reduces the number of prospective target aircraft and increases the cost, both men resorted to unconventional techniques (the shoe and the underwear) presumably to escape detection. The failures of the attacks can in each case be traced to the fact that the terrorist was forced to use an unconventional method – the shoebomber’s fuses were too damp to burn properly because of moisture from the ground (after wearing them for a day) and the sweat from his feet, the underwear bomber’s PETN was insufficiently contained to detonate and only deflagrated – because he placed it in a soft package so that it could be hidden in his underwear. It should be noted that in both cases the amounts of explosive was borderline to do the job – decreasing the chance of success if it had detonated.

    In both cases it can be pretty confidently stated the terrorists attempts to avoid the security regime was responsible for the fact that both plots were failures. Without the security regime it is reasonable to assume both men would have entered the plane with half a pound of PETN in a pipe and a blasting cap – or some similar arraingment.

  30. #30 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    I got a rock to sell you. It may not look like much but it keeps the tigers terrorists away.

    Strangeone and Chris Roads, I would like to buy your rocks.

    Matt, don’t be stupid. Your crystal doesn’t keep elephants away.

  31. #31 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    I have a foreign policy that stops terrorists.

  32. #32 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    Without the security regime it is reasonable to assume both men would have entered the plane with half a pound of PETN in a pipe and a blasting cap – or some similar arraingment.

    Not sure that is what “reasonable” means.

  33. #33 |  Dante | 

    Crazyboob:

    Your interpretation of my remarks just reveals your lack of understanding of the concepts of sarcasm and nuance, but OK, just to clear it up so that even you will understand please change the words “Holy Cow” to “Eat Shit & Die, you ignorant TSA wanna-be” in my sentence.

    Thanks for reading.

  34. #34 |  Loretta Nall | 

    The NFL story breaks my heart. It’s like the players are good …considered heros and role models even..as long as they are entertaining us but as soon as the entertainment is over it’s fuck you Bo Jangles and off to prison you go. Not to mention the terrible toll football takes on the human body. I hope there is a very big public outcry about this.

  35. #35 |  Mattocracy | 

    “Without the security regime it is reasonable to assume both men would have entered the plane with half a pound of PETN in a pipe and a blasting cap – or some similar arraingment”

    No, the pre 9/11 metal detectors would have gone off had they used a pipe.

    A much more cost effective measure would be to stop implimenting the invassive forign policies that inspire people to attack this country, rather than fund the TSA.

  36. #36 |  plutosdad | 

    Everyone I know who played football in college is in a lot of pain, some in pain 24×7. That is not even pro players. of course they have addictions to painkillers.
    Secondly, how do we know they even have addictions? With all that pain, isn’t it actually medication?
    From what he said, maybe in this case he really was addicted, but in general, these are people who are banged up and in tremendous pain. guys who only played in college are not rich, most pro players are not rich either, yet they have crap health care after they retire, and the only way to deal with the pain will likely land them in jail.

    some of my friends who love football and played, are very glad their sons are not interested.

  37. #37 |  Leon Wolfeson | 

    @5 – Have a look what the Nordic countries lock people up for. It’s quite interesting. (They lock up VERY few people…)

    @21 – Isn’t that an APC?

  38. #38 |  Maggie McNeill | 

    #13: LOL! ;-)

  39. #39 |  Bill | 

    It seems to me that the proof that the TSA is accomplishing its job of preventing terrorist attacks on planes is that the terrorists are now blowing up trains, train stations, buses, shopping malls, schools and all the other things that the TSA isn’t protecting. After all, if you were a terrorist and could no longer blow up a plane, wouldn’t you look for a target that was less well protected? It seems that the TSA might indeed be just as effective as that tiger-repelling rock. But don’t worry, soon the TSA can come and “protect” all those other things so we’ll know that it’s really them, and not a severe shortage of actual terrorists in the U.S., that’s keeping us safe.

  40. #40 |  tom | 

    so where does the info come from for the migration map? What is going to happen when the govt gets its hands on the data?T

  41. #41 |  Kolohe | 

    “Something bacon doesn’t make better.”

    I’m not willing to be judgmental without some rigorous scientific testing.

  42. #42 |  treefroggy | 

    “Something bacon doesn’t make better.” I understand that the first 4 orders were shipped to a Mr. Kermit the Frog,

  43. #43 |  frogster | 

    Depends if you’re already “makin’ bacon.”

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