Morning Links

Monday, October 10th, 2011
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37 Responses to “Morning Links”

  1. #1 |  Dave Krueger | 

    Online gambling and the perils of prohibition.

    I’m only a little more than half way through the Ken Burns documentary, but so far it seems like the implication is that prohibition didn’t work mostly because they didn’t fund it sufficiently and hire enough law enforcement.

  2. #2 |  dave smith | 

    Hey, the Egyptian government built that road, taught those people how to walk and talk and whatever other skills they need to protest, so the government has the right to run em over.

  3. #3 |  Yizmo Gizmo | 

    “Several months after President Obama ordered Anwar Awlaki killed by the CIA, the Obama DOJ — specifically lawyers within its Office of Legal Counsel — produced a memorandum legally authorizing this action.”

    Skeptics should be aware that lawyers *legally* authorized this action.
    Come on, do you think American lawyers acting in collusion with the
    CIA would authorize something illegal or immoral?
    Jeez.

  4. #4 |  C. S. P. Schofield | 

    It runs against my gut reaction to these protests, but let’s not dismiss the entire movement on the basis on one, possibly atypical, group of proto-fascists. I happen to think that over time the protesters will show themselves to be the usual hodge-podge of trendy hobbyists- protest as a lifestyle. But I could be wrong, and I’m fighting my impatient impulse to characterize them as little idiots and stop thinking.

  5. #5 |  Mattocracy | 

    Infiltrating the protests and behaving like a hooligan so as to give the protestors a bad name. Just epic douchebaggery.

  6. #6 |  Al V | 

    There should be some means for the executive (whoever it is) to release information without dumping the whole matter into public view.

    Manning on the other hand, released hundreds of thousands of documents into the public domain without caring what the consequences of releasing that material was. Some of the material has shown the government to be wasting money, committing misdeeds and covering up misdeeds. BUT there was a lot of information that our enemies can use to do damage to the US both diplomatically and physically. It should not have been released. That is why Bradley Manning is a traitor to his country.

  7. #7 |  zendingo | 

    @6 Al V

    pure speculation. nothing manning relased has been proven to be harmful to anyone. please provide citation of the damage that has been done as a direct result of the info manning released…..

  8. #8 |  (B)oscoH | 

    Microsoft allegedly had one part-time lobbyist in DC when it first found itself in the crosshairs of the DOJ in the 1990s. It would be interesting to see the historical chart for these various companies.

  9. #9 |  James | 

    Coffee snobs: “I wouldn’t feed those to my step-dad… and he stabbed my mom to death” Those must be really bad pastries.

  10. #10 |  ClubMedSux | 

    pure speculation. nothing manning relased has been proven to be harmful to anyone. please provide citation of the damage that has been done as a direct result of the info manning released…

    If only there was some way to collect evidence and allow both Manning and the government to present their sides of the story to a neutral arbiter to, say, JUDGE whether or not Manning is actually GUILTY of a crime…

    Nope. Can’t think of a way to do that, so I guess he’ll just have to remain detained indefinitely.

  11. #11 |  Dave Krueger | 

    You can’t have “government by the people” when the people are kept in the dark. There’s not much point in having elections if the people doing the voting are intentionally uninformed or misinformed by the government they have elected. While there is a need for some secrecy, the U.S. has come to rely on secrecy in order to carry out policies that the public might reject.

    Manning made a lot of information public that should have been public a long time ago. The government, by keeping the public in the dark, has done far more to jeopardize the country that Manning could ever do. In other words, if the government keeps the public out of the loop, the public has the right to inject itself into the loop by any means possible. Manning facilitated that.

  12. #12 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    El Paso related: Chicago murder rate drops after handguns become legal.

    I’m Googling for more info.

  13. #13 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    but let’s not dismiss the entire movement on the basis on one, possibly atypical, group of proto-fascists.

    What I said about the Tea Party…in the beginning when it was mostly Ron Paul fans, anti-debt, and fiscal conservatives.

    Most people (IMHO) believe groups of people (Occupy, Arab revolts, etc.) all hold one view and a consensus of goals. I can’t get consensus in a 4 person meeting about a birthday party, but I can get a torch and pitchfork crowd worked up about “them”.

    It’ll be interesting to see how Occupy movement gets usurped and by whom.

  14. #14 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    Manning on the other hand, released hundreds of thousands of documents into the public domain without caring what the consequences of releasing that material was.

    I was under the assumption that Manning released the info to Wikileaks (who spent time redacting certain bits of info). Assange even got the US military heads to declare no harm had happened to US soldiers as a result of the leaked info.

    So…

    BUT there was a lot of information that our enemies can use to do damage to the US both diplomatically and physically. It should not have been released. That is why Bradley Manning is a traitor to his country.

    All of this is false. AND I don’t give a crap about diplomatic damage (blame Hillary Clinton and her Nigerian prince credit card scheme).

    Bradley Manning is a hero to the human race. His country, on the other hand, needs to man-up.

  15. #15 |  Marty | 

    #6 ‘BUT there was a lot of information that our enemies can use to do damage to the US both diplomatically and physically. It should not have been released. That is why Bradley Manning is a traitor to his country.’

    please cite information that can be used to physically damage us. the only things I saw that could be used to damage us diplomatically, really amounted to a few politicians being embarrassed by because they said stupid shit.

    Bradley Manning is not a traitor- the people who committed the atrocities he exposed are traitors. The politicians who created these quagmires are the ones disregarding the laws of the land.

    The real tragedy of the leaks is that it appears he’s the only one suffering for it. The bulk of the bad behavior he exposed is being ignored by the public.

  16. #16 |  Marty | 

    that video of the egyptian army firing on the Christians reminded me of old footage of MacArthur leading troops against the WWI veteran protesters. Hopefully, the occupy protests won’t experience more violence than they have…

  17. #17 |  Rob Lyman | 

    I don’t understand the “don’t film me” thing from anyone (cop or protester). I comment under my real name, and I don’t say things I wouldn’t stand behind. When I’m out in public, I don’t do things I wouldn’t stand behind. Anything I feel the need to shield from public view, I do at home.

    I can understand how people worry the film might be edited or misconstrued by people who weren’t there, but the answer to that is to make your own video of it and embarrass the people who falsified the record.

  18. #18 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    Thanks to Kokesh for videoing the Occupy DC group. Good Lord Vader, I hope Occupy has some people less annoying and more interesting than the dude (who I will call Skiddle-bop) and the lady (who I will call Mary May I Ask You A Question In My Monotone). I dearly hope somewhere there are 20ish people more capable than these two.

    Reminds me of dozens of protests I’ve been to over the last 30 years. I could watch vids like this for hours…except for the rage it creates on me.

  19. #19 |  Charlie O | 

    Actually, I can understand the Occupy DC protesters not wanting to be filmed. I’m sure DC and federal law enforcement will be reviewing any pictures and videos they can find to conjure up charges against Americans exercising their rights to assemble and protest.

  20. #20 |  FridayNext | 

    The coffee snobs film was great. Reminds me of this classic scene in HIgh Fidelity. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ECyX8A3iP0

    Guys like Barry are one reason I love buying music online.

    And of course there’s John Hodgman’s rant against condescending nerds: “Thank you pudgy neck beard counter guy for cluing me into Philip K. Dick AGAIN!. What’s the matter? Out of Confederacy of Dunces this week?”

    http://www.thedailyshow.com/watch/tue-august-16-2011/borders-goes-out-of-business?xrs=share_copy

  21. #21 |  HD | 

    I hope Occupy has some people less annoying and more interesting

    Of course there are. But none of these will show up on video selectively edited to make the protesters look like idiots.

  22. #22 |  Jim March | 

    There’s another issue here. Latino murder rates across the US are actually very low, down near white levels even when there’s a major economic disparity favoring the whites. East Asian murder rates are usually far below white levels.

    A major cultural factor in all this is the relative strength of their family structures. Latino families are generally in pretty good shape, including (and maybe especially Mexican and Mexican-American familes. Most East Asian families are also in good shape, and combine that with a very low level of cultural violence generally.

    Black family structures are in terrible shape, having been stomped on repeatedly by the initial slave-grab out of Africa, and then slavery, and then housing and economic discrimination, welfare laws rigged to split up families, the “War On (Some) Drugs” and other horrors. Their corresponding murder rates are horrific.

    The stereotype of the “violent Mexican” is simply false, unless billions of dollars of cocaine traffic is spliced in, and at that point any human on earth could turn violent…

  23. #23 |  derfel cadarn | 

    Embarrassed politicians ? Hardly seems possible for the cretins running our government. But it does appear to work ,lets continue doing it until they all scurry back into the fetid crevices from which they emerged.

  24. #24 |  Juice | 

    #1 | Dave Krueger | October 10th, 2011 at 10:36 am
    Online gambling and the perils of prohibition.

    I’m only a little more than half way through the Ken Burns documentary, but so far it seems like the implication is that prohibition didn’t work mostly because they didn’t fund it sufficiently and hire enough law enforcement.

    I watched the whole thing and that’s not what I got from it. To me the take home message was that there were too many people willing to get around the law, even cops and politicians. Whenever you have a situation like that prohibition will not work at all.

  25. #25 |  omar | 

    HD,

    Are you suggesting the posted video was “selectively edited to make the protesters look like idiots”?

  26. #26 |  Irving Washington | 

    Glenn Greenwald once again succeeds in teaching me something and depressing the hell out of me.

  27. #27 |  Deoxy | 

    I think Manning’s real crime was that he embarrassed politicians.

    In terms of why they are actually prosecuting him, I would have to agree. If he was only a high-ranking Democrat, he could have done that and been congratulated for it…

    That’s not to say he SHOULDN’T be prosecuted for it, mind you, but I’d certainly put a good number of other people higher on the “needs prosecution” list. His superiors, for one easy example – hello, he sat and burned CDs of secret files and took them home for HOW long?!?

  28. #28 |  Kind of Off Topic | 

    Long story short, I’d love to see an article about the Occupy movement. From Radley Balko’s point of view, of course. It’s in Indianapolis now.

  29. #29 |  Robert | 

    @ #7 zendingo “nothing manning released has been proven to be harmful to anyone.”

    “The nine Jews remaining in Baghdad must leave because their names appeared in a WikiLeaks cable, an Anglican priest in the Iraqi capital said.”

    Boy, THAT wasn’t hard, was it?

  30. #30 |  CTD | 

    “This isn’t the South. You can’t just do whatever you want.”

    You have to love the people who fancy themselves “liberals” who let the mask slip every once in a while, exposing the authoritarian bigot underneath for all to see.

  31. #31 |  JOR | 

    Any physical or diplomatic damage the US government receives because of info Manning released is deserved. If you suffer ‘diplomatic damage’ because your misdeeds are discovered, then the problem was your misdeeds, not the discovery. It’s like an adulterer raging about the fact that their spouse found out why they’ve been staying out late every night.

  32. #32 |  lhfree | 

    Online gambling & the perils of prohibition:

    I’m in favor of legalizing it. Let Americans choose for themselves. It’s not what it seems though. Online poker especially is more than just playing poker. There are powerful edges some people use including software that tracks players’ decisions and habits and software that tries to predict unseen cards by trying to figure out the poker site’s “random number generator.” Way too much room for people to win with a bigger advantage over the average player than just skill.

  33. #33 |  Mike T | 

    The problem that Manning faces is that he released far more documents than a whistleblower could credibly claim to have read and verified showed a pattern of unethical or criminal behavior. It was essentially a temper tantrum thrown with classified data and Manning happened to have accidentally released some data that helped make him not quite so bad.

    I would like to think that most people could be reasonable enough to understand the difference between releasing documents you know show a pattern of criminal/unethical behavior and simply burning the entire contents of a SMB share to a DVD and throwing it up on a torrent.

  34. #34 |  Mike T | 

    You have to love the people who fancy themselves “liberals” who let the mask slip every once in a while, exposing the authoritarian bigot underneath for all to see.

    It’d probably make his head explode to find out that many middle class blacks are actually moving back to the South precisely because it’s more politically and economically free than many of the states their ancestors fled to are today.

  35. #35 |  Rob Lyman | 

    JOR, if a US ambassador sends a message saying “The president of Berzerkistan is eager to work with us in rooting out terrorists” or alternatively “Generalissimo X is a dangerous lunatic and our policy of engagement with him is foolish,” the revelation of either of those messages could do diplomatic damage even though neither reveals any wrongdoing at all.

    There are legitimate uses of secrecy as well as illegitimate ones.

  36. #36 |  albatross | 

    Mike T:

    Assuming there is solid evidence that Manning did what he is accused of, he should have been charged with disclosing classified information and punished according to the written laws. Instead, he was locked away in solitary for several months, and subjected to extra degrading treatment, in order to either break him or convince him to implicate Assange or some other desired target. This is the behavior of police states, not decent countries.

    As with most whistleblowing cases, with Manning’s leaks (always assuming they were his–I don’t automatically trust guilt by anonymous leak or press release), no US official will suffer any serious consequences for having serious wrongdoing revealed–paying for child prostitutes for Afghan warlords, murdering people trying to rescue dying wounded people (and nailing their kids, too), pressuring foreign governments to suppress invetigations into US torture and kidnapping programs, all those are forgivable missteps, perhaps a little embarrassing, but certainly nothing to get upset about. But leaking that information so that the American people can find out about it–that’s the serious crime here. And it’s the only one that will be punished.

    Nobody who leaks highly classified stuff to the press selectively to manipulate press coverage will face any legal consequences. And of course, only a dirty fucking hippie would expect people to be punished for running a massive torture program all across the globe, or a massive domestic spying program here at home. I mean, those things are illegal in the narrow, quaint sense of being violations of the written law, but they’re not serious crimes, like revealing the names of some US informants or embarrassing some US diplomats.

  37. #37 |  JOR | 

    “Terrorists” are just people violently opposed to the US and its allies and puppets. “Rooting them out” may or may not be legitimate. Likewise, Generallismo X’s “foolishness” or “lunacy” may or may not be a bad thing. In any case, the US government is a criminal enterprise, and any damage done to it is legitimate. Of course as a criminal enterprise it will treat whistleblowers and defectors unkindly. But the fact that this is predictable behavior on its part is not a justification for it, nor a reason to wave off criticisms of said behavior.

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