Morning Links

Tuesday, September 6th, 2011
Digg it |  reddit |  del.icio.us |  Fark

33 Responses to “Morning Links”

  1. #1 |  emerson | 

    “Texas bans cockfighting paraphernalia, allows for arrests of people caught watching cockfights . . . but formally legalizes shooting pigs from helicopters.”

    I get that there’s hypocrisy here, but I don’t think a liberty-loving person necessarily needs to take a pro-cockfighting stance. Animal cruelty is a tricky issue for libertarians, just like children’s rights. Lines have to be drawn. I’d hope more people would draw their lines so as not to include cockfighting and other animal-torturing sports in their definition of liberty.

  2. #2 |  freebob | 

    “Arizona will charge visitors to see incarcerated family and friends.”
    Nothing to see here. Just another layer of our prison-for-profit system.

    Does having “levels higher than 5 nanograms of THC per milliliter of blood” mean you were high while the blood was drawn, or does it just mean you are a regular pot smoker. I would argue that if you’re a regular smoker and you can become “too stoned to drive” chances are you shouldn’t be operating a car sober.

  3. #3 |  Hums | 

    The hogs are and invasive species and one harm full to the surrounding environment (over kill small animals, dig up roots, over breed from no natural predators) and their numbers need to be kept down. The remote location of a lot of pig groups and the spookable nature of the animal is the reason a helicopter is used. This is no different from trapping a rat or stepping on a roach. In no way should this be compared to laws on cockfighting good or ill.

  4. #4 |  perlhaqr | 

    I presume you’re lamenting the cockfighting laws, because the pigs in question in Texas are vermin that annihilate farmer’s fields. Many of them have brucellosis, and thus can’t even be eaten.

  5. #5 |  Dave Krueger | 

    Mexican teacher’s Tweets about a school shooting, which turned out to be repeating false rumors, could get her 30 years in prison.

    Time to haul out that fucking idiotic “you can’t yell fire in a crowded theater” indictment of the First Amendment.

    Sometimes it’s just a tossup as to whether to get another cup of coffee or slit my wrists.

  6. #6 |  Mike T | 

    Colorado lawmakers can’t agree on limit for per se driving-while-high convictions. I guess the good news is that they’re at least trying to look at the science.

    Most of the MADD types don’t want to face the fact that the sort of people who are likely to drive extremely intoxicated are not wired like the rest of us. They’re the sort of people who won’t behave until the state starts executing them for killing someone while pulling a .20+ BAC or drug equivalent.

    Case in point (I know anecdote is not the singular of data), when I was in high school, the resource officer told my class about how a drunk killed his cousin. The drunk woman had nearly a .40 BAC and was driving over 80mph down a street where the limit was 35mph and hit his cousin who was waiting for the light to change. At the trial, the drunk was incredulous that she was getting about 10-15 years.

    People need to face up to the fact that the only deterrence, if any, will come from applying murder statutes to such people, not roadblocks and taking away their licenses.

  7. #7 |  C. S. P. Schofield | 

    Adding to #3 (perlhaqr)’s observation;

    Feral pigs are also dangerous. A full sized feral hog or sow is nearly as dangerous as a wild boar, or so I have read. The people who want to shoot pigs from helicopters may enjoy it, but they aren’t simply having fun; there’s a reason.

  8. #8 |  Michael Pack | 

    Mike T,,most people killed on the highways are killed by SOBER drivers not paying attention.Drunck drivers kill very few.Most deaths are the drunk driver and or their passenger.So,are you going to charge the SOBER driver with murder also?We need to punish reckless driving no matter the cause.

  9. #9 |  PigHater | 

    If you’re having a problem with this … “but formally legalizes shooting pigs from helicopters.” – then you are living in a cave. Get out, but don’t let the pigs kill you, cause they will.

    2+ million pigs in TX. Also FL, CA, and other states. Australia has more wild pigs than humans, something like 25+ million.

    These beasts have no natural predators, destroy crops, grasslands, livestock. Additionally, they EAT entire ecosystems — snakes, frogs, birds, deer, cattle, and anything else that they can attack.

    Don’t forget that wild pigs also carry numerous diseases, some of which can transfer to humans. Others transfer to livestock. These diseases can be deadly.

    Do some studying before you judge.

  10. #10 |  Highway | 

    Mike T., I go a bit farther and think there really is no deterrence for folks like that. There is no threat that you can face someone like that with that will make them realize it applies to them. It won’t happen when you call it ‘murder’, or whatever else you wanted to call it.

    I really think we just need to accept that there are going to be people who will drive impaired. And sometimes they will tragically harm others. They cannot put that 2 and 2 together, that their behavior may cause a severe accident and that the likelihood of that accident goes up the more times they do it.

    You’re right that the MADD types don’t recognize this, but there’s also the question of what is MADD’s mission now? Since the casual drunk driver has pretty much been eradicated due to enforcement and mindset changes, they’ve pushed the ‘legal limit’ down into non-impaired ranges and are pushing for more in order to keep any sort of purpose for their group. But what that starts doing is punishing other people, as well as giving police more ‘tools’ to harass ordinary folks.

  11. #11 |  Yizmo Gizmo | 

    “# Arizona will charge visitors to see incarcerated family and friends.”

    This one is specifically for all the skeptics out there who refused to believe the Prison-Industrial Complex was all about the $$dinero$$.

  12. #12 |  DoubleU | 

    #2 | freebob Just another layer of our prison-for-profit system.

    I don’t understand conservatives, liberals or libertarians.

    Schools run by the government are bad, they need to be privatized and run for profit to improve education, but privatized prisons run for profit are bad, so they need to be run by government? It is all so confusing.

  13. #13 |  SJE | 

    The US Govt should have to pay for Clemens defense, and it should come from the same place that prosecuted him. Seems fair

  14. #14 |  CyniCAl | 

    You’re on to something DoubleU — the solution is no government. Unfortunately, no one’s interested in solving anything, that gravy train must keep rolling.

  15. #15 |  Radley Balko | 

    Do some studying before you judge.

    Never wrote that I’m opposed to the law. Just pointing out the selective concern over animal rights in the two laws, which were passed in the same legislative session.

  16. #16 |  Mattocracy | 

    If you really can’t see the difference between for profit schools and for profit prisons, and how the economic incentives create vastly different effects on our society, I don’t know what to tell you.

  17. #17 |  Dave Krueger | 

    #12 DoubleU

    I don’t understand conservatives, liberals or libertarians.

    Schools run by the government are bad, they need to be privatized and run for profit to improve education, but privatized prisons run for profit are bad, so they need to be run by government? It is all so confusing.

    Well, we don’t mind subjecting prisoners to government run stuff, but children haven’t done anything to deserve it.

    Just kidding. I and most libertarians I know don’t have a problem with privatized prisons. The words, “for profit”, are not evil.

    On the other hand, Arizona’s charging visitors was a government action.

    With regard to the public versus the private sector, I think many people believe that libertarians see business as all good and government as all bad. That’s a mistake. The private sector is hardly free from corruption and sleazy players. What makes the private sector preferable is that people have the option to go to a different supplier. And that makes all the difference.

  18. #18 |  Brandon | 

    If shooting pigs from helicopters is outlawed, only outlaws will shoot pigs from helicopters.

  19. #19 |  freebob | 

    #12
    Thanks for telling me my opinion about education. Care to tell me, and everyone, how I feel about roads and bridges, or any other libertarian trope that doesn’t apply to me.
    I’ll start the conversation, anyone who defends privately owned prisons are pedophiles. Wow, this is easy.

  20. #20 |  Windy | 

    On the Roger Clemens trial, I just cannot get it thru my thick skull why government not only is allowed (cops and all manner of elected and hired government officials) and even in some cases mandated (ONDCP/drug czar) to lie to Americans, but lying to ANY government official is a crime? If it is a crime for individuals to lie to government then it should also be a crime for any government official to lie to any or every citizen.

  21. #21 |  Mike T | 

    So,are you going to charge the SOBER driver with murder also?

    In most cases, I would support that. I’m in favor of making any severely negligent homicide a capital crime on the grounds that severe negligence is functionally similar to an intent to kill. For example, someone who drives 100mph through a neighborhood with children has demonstrated implicitly that they have no concern for the welfare of their fellow man. Society has no obligation to grant them mercy.

    I really think we just need to accept that there are going to be people who will drive impaired. And sometimes they will tragically harm others.

    That’s technically true for every crime. However, we can get the victim(s) justice by ensuring a swift and terrible punishment for the perpetrator.

  22. #22 |  Irving Washington | 

    Never wrote that I’m opposed to the law. Just pointing out the selective concern over animal rights in the two laws, which were passed in the same legislative session.

    Selective concern? The two provisions are consistent with the ethical treatment of animals and good stewardship of the ecosystem. We disincentivize participation in a cruel activity, and we humanely destroy an invasive and destructive species. There’s no dissonance here.

  23. #23 |  omar | 

    That’s technically true for every crime. However, we can get the victim(s) revenge by ensuring a swift and terrible punishment for the perpetrator.

    There, I fixed it for you.

  24. #24 |  KBCraig | 

    McAllister questioned the need for a per se limit — which eases the burden on prosecutors to prove impairment.

    Ah, but that’s the very reason for per se limits: ease of prosecution. That’s why an alcohol content of 0.08 is legally the same and being falling down drunk, while proving any actual impairment at that level is almost impossible.

  25. #25 |  Henry Bowman | 

    Actually, it was already legal to shoot pigs from helicopters in Texas; the restriction was that one could only do it on [over] one’s one property. The law removed that particular restriction.

  26. #26 |  KBCraig | 

    So,are you going to charge the SOBER driver with murder also?

    That was exactly my argument in response to a recent local case.

    In 2010, a man pulled out of the parking lot after a high school football game. It was dark, there were no street lights, and no crosswalks; traffic was heavy. A father and daughter darted across the road just as the driver pulled out; he hit both, and the father died (the daughter had a broken leg).

    The driver tested exactly 0.08 BAC, so he was charged with one count of intoxication manslaughter, and one count of intoxication assault. Every police officer who was at the scene testified that they did not suspect he was intoxicated. He was convicted, and sentenced to seven years in prison.

    A dozen years ago, before the prime facie standard of intoxcation was lowered, he wouldn’t even have received a ticket. If he was a tee-totaller or slobbering drunk didn’t seem to be at issue, since the primary cause of the accident was two pedestrians darting into heavy traffic in the dark.

  27. #27 |  Corkscrew | 

    Not terribly impressed by the tax haven argument. To me (and everyone else I’ve spoken to), the problem isn’t that people in Country A pay lower taxes than people in Country B. That’s great – good for them.

    The problem is when they pay lower taxes in Country A despite living and working in Country B. That’s like paying a Skoda dealer for a car and then grabbing one off the neighbouring Ferrari lot. It’s unfair on the other people in Country B, who are implicitly subsidising their existence.

    This is especially irritating since the people and organisations who can take best advantage of tax havens tend to be those who are already pretty well off. Effectively what they’re doing is turning income/corporate tax into a regressive tax.

    As far as I can tell, Mr Mitchell doesn’t even touch on this, which is odd given that it seems to be the central argument of his opposition. Anyone care to comment?

  28. #28 |  DoubleU | 

    Freebob, #19 I hate roads and bridges also, it is one of the things that made me interested in the libertarian movement. I have stated that in previous threads.
    If you want me to play along with your conversation, I will play the cheerful one, and I guess you want to be the angry one. I will tell you how you feel about pie. You like pie… because everyone likes pie.

    Okay, your turn.

  29. #29 |  Belabor | 

    Radley, I’m a big fan, but seriously fuck those pigs.. and I mean the four legged ones. Talk to anyone who lives someplace with a wild hog population and there is zero sympathy for them.

    Which reminds me, check out this dude who hunts the hogs with a home-made UAV. http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1478852

  30. #30 |  freebob | 

    #28
    Alright, I’ll give it another go!
    You don’t like Mad Men, a little too pretentious for you. If you did like Mad Men I hope you’ll take note and adjust your TiVo accordingly. Oh, and you have a TiVo.

  31. #31 |  TomcatTCH | 

    Killing pigs isn’t hunting, it’s an attempt to control an invasive, dangerous species that destroys food supplies that would otherwise end up on someone’s table (or in their fuel tank, what a waste).

    Shooting wild dogs would not equate to dog fighting.

    Try again.

  32. #32 |  GÄC | 

    Very random thoughts on the whole shoot-pigs-from-helicopters issue. Last autumn my wife and I noticed signs up along the road outside of our village warning of a boar hunt that would be taking place. What was unusual about this boar hunt was that it was being done the “old fashioned” way – with spears. One group of hunters would drive the boars to another group at the other end of the forrest waiting with their spears. Seems shooting them from a helicopter may actually be more humane…

    Another interesting, but completely unrelated fact – seems that many of the wild pigs in my area are radioactive. You actually have to take them to the government for testing before you can eat them. Apparently the food they root around for is right at the depth that is contaminated from the fallout from Chernobyl…

  33. #33 |  supercat | 

    #12 | DoubleU | “Schools run by the government are bad, they need to be privatized and run for profit to improve education, but privatized prisons run for profit are bad, so they need to be run by government?”

    I think the argument is that people are supposed to have a choice of school, but prisons aren’t supposed to be voluntary. “Okay, I’ll serve my time in the Hilton Deluxe prison complex, with private a private whirlpool bath in each room, daily back massage, etc.” Somehow I don’t think that would work.

Leave a Reply