Saturday Links

Saturday, June 25th, 2011
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31 Responses to “Saturday Links”

  1. #1 |  Helmut O' Hooligan | 

    “New York legalizes gay marriage. In protest, Newt Gingrich promptly divorces his third wife.”

    LOL! Thanks for the morning belly laugh, Radley. Well done!

  2. #2 |  Tom | 

    Oh, I see, it was the US Park Police that did the arrest. Apparently the Cab commission meeting was held in a US Park space. Those Park Police are truly loathsome individuals.

  3. #3 |  Helmut O' Hooligan | 

    “But more and more, they seem to involve giving airport-style pat-downs and screenings of unsuspecting passengers at bus terminals, ferries, and even subways.”

    Hmm. Maybe the TSA should just send screeners to sit outside people’s homes. Then when the homeowners get up to go to work, they can get a random patdown to make sure they aren’t carrying anything that can be used as a weapon (Note to TSA: Most objects can be used as weapons. It is the individual’s intent that matters).

    If we can prevent just one incident of workplace violence… ;)

  4. #4 |  Dave Krueger | 

    New York legalizes gay marriage.

    Yay! Now there are even more people who get the special privileges of marriage. So now there is only one group that remains excluded from those special rights: unmarried people. But then, who the fuck cares about unmarried people? If they knew what was good for them, they’d get married like decent people do.

    Sorry, but if gays were really interested in equality for everyone, they would have been campaigning to get the government the fuck out of marriage rather than merely trying to get a slice of the special rights pie for themselves.

    Government has no business regulating marriage, gay or otherwise.

  5. #5 |  kant | 

    RE: TSA

    Wasn’t the TSA’s argument to it’s questionable constitutionality that people didn’t have to fly? It would seem that the VIPR takes a lot of that “choice” out of the claim. How is this any different from a (albeit large) stop and frisk program?

  6. #6 |  Dave Krueger | 

    No, I think the TSA’s argument was that people didn’t have to travel.

    Be patient. It will soon be common and accepted practice for cops to stop and search everyone they please in any jurisdiction. But, this has to come incrementally so no one notices (I mean aside from those annoying libertarian idiots).

  7. #7 |  Helmut O' Hooligan | 

    #4 Dave Krueger: “Government has no business regulating marriage, gay or otherwise.”

    Exactly. If more people took this position, we could end this aspect of the culture wars pretty quickly. But instead, it becomes just another issue for government-dependent people to use in order to cause drama. What a spectacular waste of time and energy.

  8. #8 |  Rita | 

    Regarding TSA gropefests, coming soon to a neighborhood street near you: “He had seen the SS plainclothesmen inspecting the stars of Jews on the Alexanderplatz and arresting those who failed to pass inspection.” (from “The Last Jews in Berlin,” by Leonard Gross, page 32)

  9. #9 |  Marty | 

    ‘if you didn’t want to be searched, you wouldn’t be doing something suspicious…’ (like traveling, commuting to work, vacationing, shopping, running errands, etc.

    I wonder what kind of impact these tsa twits have had on pocket knife, nail clipper, and snow globe manufacturers/gift shops…

  10. #10 |  perlhaqr | 

    Each blood-alcohol analyst in California processes an average of 3,220 cases annually, Justice Kennedy wrote, and the Los Angeles Police Department’s 10 toxicologists spent 782 hours at 261 court appearances in a recent year. New Mexico’s blood-alcohol analysts, he added, each “recently received 200 subpoenas per year,” often requiring them to travel long distances to testify. This resulted in chaos, the state crime lab said.

    “Following the Constitution is so inconvenient“, Justice Kennedy whined, “we should just throw all of that crap out and do what’s easiest for us.”

  11. #11 |  Michael Pack | 

    I agree with Dave K.As I mostly do.It’s about tax deductions and tax free employer health insurance(a form of income that the goernment let’s the employers write off and no one pay’s income taxes on).The tax code needs to be redone.Why not a 15 % tax on all income over 25000 dollars,no deductions?Eliminate the corp tax and tax the money when paid out as income or investment returns.That way you could leave money year to year to invest and grow without a penalty.

  12. #12 |  Stephen | 

    I wish somebody would make a TSA zombie movie kind of like “Night of the living dead”. Except that instead of saying “braiiinnns”, the TSA zombies would be saying “juuuuunnnkk”.

  13. #13 |  Gideon Darrow | 

    Good to see the Post getting a little more skeptical of the official police line.

    http://www.washingtoncitypaper.com/blogs/citydesk/2009/12/22/washington-post-sits-on-eyewitness-account/

  14. #14 |  Marty | 

    Stephen- this is a great idea! only, I’d make it so all the bureaucrats, cops, etc are zombies. you can ‘pay’ them off with some kind of ‘tax’ or they’ll eat you.

  15. #15 |  Gideon Darrow | 

    @ #10 perlhaqr:

    To quote a less whiny Supreme Court Justice:

    “Why did they write the Bill of Rights? Many of the Supreme Court decisions relate to the way cases shall be tried. Practically all of the decisions make it more difficult to convict people of crimes. What about guaranteeing a man a right to a lawyer? Of course that makes it more difficult to convict him. What about saying he shall not be compelled to be a witness against himself? That also makes it more difficult to convict him. What about no ‘unreasonable search or seizure shall be made?’ That makes it more difficult. It was written to make it more difficult. What the Court does is to try to follow the Constitution by saying you’ve got to try people in this and that way. Why did they want a jury? Because they didn’t want people being subject to a judge who might hang them or convict them for a political crime or something of that kind. And they said the same thing about an indictment. That’s why they put it in the laws. They intended to make it more difficult for the doors of a prison to close on a man because of his trial. I’m all for this. I’m for the Bill of Rights, and I’m not saying I’d write every one of its ten amendments in the language they used. But I’ll try to enforce them in the exact language they were written.” – Hugo Black

    http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/S?ammem/afccalbib:@field(AUTHOR+@od1(Black,+Hugo+LaFayette,+1886-1971))

  16. #16 |  Mattocracy | 

    Good job Krueg. Me neighbors got married recently while in their 50′s. They never intended on getting married and loved happily as sinners for 18 years. Then the guy had a heart attack and the assholes at the hospital wouldn’t let his girlfriend any where near him or make any medical decisions. Cause that’s the law. They got married for no other reason than the government was punishing them for being married.

  17. #17 |  qwints | 

    Anytime I see someone talking about special rights, I think about the racists and homophobes who use that term to prevent their targets from getting any rights. I realize that wasn’t your intention Dave, but you realize that it is impossible to get the government entirely out of marriage due to estate distribution and custody disputes.

  18. #18 |  MPH | 

    Wilfred – it looks like a live animation of the comic strip Calvin & Hobbes crossed with the movie Magic. For the two of you that might not be familiar, Calvin was, for the entire multi-year run of the strip, a 6 year old boy who was expert at driving everyone crazy. Hobbes was his tiger. Whenever anyone other than Calvin was in the frame with Hobbes, Hobbes was a toy stuffed tiger. But the rest of the time, we, the audience, and Calvin, saw Hobbes as a live, talking, tiger. In the movie Magic the lead character was an insane depressed ventriloquist who thought his dummy was live and could talk, and even commit murder, independently from himself (this was NOT a comedy). But instead of an inanimate object like Hobbes or the dummy, Wilfred uses a dog so that they can work in goofy sight gags (like humping the hot waitress). At least, that’s the impression I have gotten from the commercials. Alas, unlike Radley, I didn’t find the commercials intriguing enough to invest the time to watch the show. When a comedy show’s commercials don’t make me laugh, I figure the show won’t, either. But then, comedy is very subjective. For those who choose to watch, I hope you find it funny.

  19. #19 |  Dave Krueger | 

    #17 qwints

    I realize that wasn’t your intention Dave, but you realize that it is impossible to get the government entirely out of marriage due to estate distribution and custody disputes.

    I realize that the government supplies the process by which contract disputes are arbitrated. I don’t see that as justification for making the government a party to the original contract.

    When the government waves its magic wand over a couple, it serves no purpose aside from opening the door for government control and it forces a one-size-fits-all solution on everyone. The government blessing does nothing to enhance the chance for success of the union nor does it ensure children have a better life.

    Government sanctioned marriage is simply the means by which the majority forces its cultural preferences on others (and the proof of that is the fact that it’s been off-limits to gays until now).

  20. #20 |  Les | 

    I agree that government should be out of the marriage business. But since that’s so far away, I think it’s fine that we should celebrate that a traditionally oppressed group of people are being treated fairly under the law. This is progress.

  21. #21 |  QOTD § Unqualified Offerings | 

    [...] Radley wins it: New York legalizes gay marriage. In protest, Newt Gingrich promptly divorces his third wife. [...]

  22. #22 |  Aaron | 

    So what is the right, legal response to tell the TSA to go to hell, and that if they touch you they’ll be sued for battery, and that if they detain you they’ll be sued for false arrest?

  23. #23 |  J.S. | 

    “Anytime I see someone talking about special rights, I think about the racists and homophobes who use that term to prevent their targets from getting any rights.”

    Yes, its always those darn haters. It could never be about the fact that when you create affirmative action or hate crime laws you now create a whole set of new problems. You elevate some above others because they’re a special victim class. So much for equality.

  24. #24 |  Joe | 

    •New York legalizes gay marriage. In protest, Newt Gingrich promptly divorces his third wife.

    Now Newt can legally marry Dede Scozzafava.

  25. #25 |  shecky | 

    “Yes, its always those darn haters.”

    Well, in this case, it is always those darn haters who want to prevent their targets from getting any rights.

    Arguing that the government blessing does nothing to enhance the chance for success of the union nor does it ensure children have a better life is a red herring. Unless you argue that’s the reason the government is involved at all. Same sex marriage advocates don’t seem particularly fond of that line of reasoning.

  26. #26 |  Sean L. | 

    The left criticizes the fair market because it’s not “perfect.” It is true that “legalizing” same-sex marraige is not perfect, but today is better than yesterday.

  27. #27 |  Mister DNA | 

    Sorry for the threadjack, but has anyone seen this?

    Inside a Russian Crok House: Zombie Junkies

    Background: Codeine can be purchased over-the-counter in Russia, and with a few household chemicals, it can be converted to Desomorphine. Unfortunately, impurities caused during the manufacturing process can cause severe necrosis.

    BTW, they are not kidding about the videos being extremely graphic.

  28. #28 |  dunphy | 

    this confrontation cause ruling was EXCELLENT… it was correct on the law, and also brings about a good result. the right to confront one’s accuser has sadly been eroded to some extent by the war on domestic violence. this is an excellent ruling

  29. #29 |  c andrew | 

    Mr DNA,

    Are you sure that is the result of the drug? Looks like Necrotizing Fasciitis to me.

  30. #30 |  Mister DNA | 

    c andrew,

    From Wikipedia’s entry on Desomorphine:

    The drug is easily made from codeine, iodine and red phosphorus in a similar process to the manufacture of methamphetamine from pseudoephedrine, but desomorphine made this way is highly impure and contaminated with various toxic and corrosive byproducts. Since this mix is routinely injected immediately with little or no further purification, “Krokodil” has become notorious for producing severe tissue damage and gangrene, sometimes requiring limb amputation, in long-term users.

    I realize that those Russian news reports could very well be drug war propaganda, but even if I was into opiates, I wouldn’t want that shit in my veins.

  31. #31 |  Greg | 

    but even if I was into opiates, I wouldn’t want that shit in my veins.

    Hence, the argument for re-legalizing absolutely everything. In the early 1900s, one could purchase coke and heroin from the Sears catalog. It ain’t rocket science, it is easy to find.

    Shockingly, (ok, not) addiction percentages were about the same back when EVERYTHING was legal. The Puritan religious ethos nonsense that promotes banning anything that makes you feel good is so far outside The Constitution, that we really need to hang them all as traitors.

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