Another Mistaken Raid for Child Porn

Friday, May 27th, 2011

Family with an unsecured wireless connection gets an early-morning FBI raid, lives under a cloud of suspicion for two years.

Note that though the FBI arrested the guy they were after in November, it took them until May to get around to notifying the family they were no longer under investigation—and even then only after the media got wind of the story.

And no, it’s certainly not the first time this has happened.

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12 Responses to “Another Mistaken Raid for Child Porn”

  1. #1 |  Bob | 

    So the FBI returned their computers after 2 years? Great. Now they’re obsolete AND loaded with FBI spyware. Awesome.

  2. #2 |  Difster | 

    Isn’t it great the what the FBI takes away from this is that people should secure their wireless instead of thinking that maybe they ought to investigate a little better before destroying someone’s life?

  3. #3 |  John P. | 

    Some really outstanding police work going into these raids…

  4. #4 |  Yizmo Gizmo | 

    Shit.
    Any way we can send these commandos into Goldman Sachs?
    (My new catchphrase)

  5. #5 |  Steve Verdon | 

    I love the comment that obliquely hints that it is this family’s fault for not securing their wifi. It is like saying a woman that got raped deserved it because she was dressed like a slut. The level of douche baggery is…well I was going to say astonishing, but not anymore. Typical…yeah it is what I’ve come to expect: cop = douche bag.

  6. #6 |  Woog | 

    I love the idea of liberty, and I see the Internet as a wonderful tool to be used to advance liberty.

    For this, and other reasons, I purposely set up a wireless access point that is unsecured and named to let individuals know it’s intentionally open. (Since my arrangements with my ISP allow resale, then I can most certainly resell at zero if I feel like it, which I do.)

    To hell with the possibility that armed thugs will object.

  7. #7 |  general garbage | 

    @woog- while your intentions are admirable, you could find yourself on the wrong end of a dmca claim, and as the “provider” you could very well find yourself held liable for the behavior of your users.

  8. #8 |  JdL | 

    while your intentions are admirable, you could find yourself on the wrong end of a dmca claim, and as the “provider” you could very well find yourself held liable for the behavior of your users.

    So, let’s all live our lives in fear of government raids and/or dmca lawsuits, and never take any chances! Is that your message?

  9. #9 |  Woog | 

    So what, GG? It’s possible I could be sued, cracked/hacked, robbed, and/or murdered because of the open access point, but I choose to continue to do what I have done and provide access to those nearby. (In fact, I’m slowly expanding the range around the neighborhood using repeaters and property owners’ permission.)

    Neither do I concern myself overmuch with the possibility of being a victim of a terrorist attack, getting killed in a car crash, or being mugged – I take what I consider to be responsible steps to deal with situations that merit them, and simply strive to live life freely regardless of that which I cannot control.

  10. #10 |  “This whole incident was evil.” [Darleen Click] UPDATED | 

    [...] Really? Set aside a moment the debate on the legalization of drugs and ask yourself, honestly, do you think these kind of pre-dawn, over-the-top, pseudo-military raids would stop if drugs were fully legalized? You don’t think they’re used for other things like, say child pr0n? [...]

  11. #11 |  Stories of consensual crime enforcement | Nobody's Business | 

    [...] May 27: Radley Balko posts about a mistaken raid for child porn. [...]

  12. #12 |  Wireless Access Point | 

    Thanks for this. I’m looking for a wireless access point. Will come back to you web site again.

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