Morning Links

Friday, April 29th, 2011
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22 Responses to “Morning Links”

  1. #1 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    Kudos to the judge, but the reporter never balks at writing the line about “…began treating the family like criminals even after the she identified herself as a judge.”

    SOP if not a state agent.

  2. #2 |  Irving Washington | 

    Wait, right-wing Republicans teamed with the media to create the body scanner controversy? Strange bedfellows.

  3. #3 |  xenia onatopp | 

    Man Cleared In Central Park Jogging Case Demands Apology From Trump

    Sorry to go off topic right off the bat, but I thought this might interest folks here. I’d love to see some enterprising journalist– say, Radley– really nail Trump for this, call him to account for, as I pointed out over at H & R, advocating the death penalty for a 14 year old boy wrongfully charged with and convicted of a non-capital offense. I mean, I’d like to see reporters fucking haunt him with it, just not let it drop, kinda like him with the birth certificate. Except, you know, true.

  4. #4 |  Mattocracy | 

    Yeah. Reading about a liberal defending the thuggish TSA because they want a union so they can’t be held accountable for violating people’s rights makes you realize that your modern mainstream liberals aren’t a bit better than the neocons.

    Vomit.

  5. #5 |  Yizmo Gizmo | 

    “Here’s a bit more on the Florida judge who was confronted by cops who had gone to the wrong house.”

    Florida is the closest we have distilled toward establishing a pure “Police State” environment. K9 cops, school cops, park and recreation cops, beach cops, undercover drug cops, confidential informants. The naive assumption was that cops and snitches (and boatloads of lawyers) everywhere would lead to “good” things. [Bad prediction.] So, when something like this happens, it’s hard not to think, it was bound to happen sooner or later.

    When I was in Palm Beach County Jail, after getting mugged by Boca Raton cops, for the heinous crime of walking down the street without a Rolex and a Tommy Bahama shirt, they were showing the program COPS and one of the inmates was featured, driving around wasted, with a small pile of coke on his dash and his daughter in the back seat. Boy, was that a raucous moment in the pod.

  6. #6 |  perlhaqr | 

    Mattocracy: I’d say it makes you realise how actually psychotic they are.

  7. #7 |  Ahcuah | 

    OK, why do you need a SWAT team to investigate prostitution?

    Did they think the prostitute was going to flush her hoo-hoo down the toilet?

  8. #8 |  Deoxy | 

    On the prostitution warrant, that’s actually not SO bad. Compared to what they routinely do, that’s actually not bad at all – the house actually DID belong to the guy they were after! Of course, the “dynamic entry” for a bloody PROSTITUTION charge was ridiculous (“position compromised” – mighty convenient for them, eh?), of course, but to call that “wrong house” doesn’t really fit (compared to all the other ones you report around here) – I’d recommend not including it in the stats for this sort of thing… it’s a weak example (and there are SO MANY better ones).

    The wrong-house-judge thing – “Deputies pulled out their weapons and began treating the family like criminals, even after Holmes identified herself as a judge, the family alleges.” Gee, “Don’t you know who I am?!?!” shows you EXACTLY the attitude of the system. I don’t CARE if you are a judge! It is COMPLETELY irrelevant! Either you are burglarizing the house, or you are not – how the police treat you should depend ENTIRELY on the fact of that issue, and what your day job is does not matter in the slightest. Judges can actually commit crimes, too, you know.

  9. #9 |  MIkeS | 

    ““Lie back and think of England.”

    You are a bad bad person… ay, caramba.

  10. #10 |  marfdrat | 

    Did the royal couple authorize the use of their image on a package of commemorative condoms? Are they receiving “royalties?”

  11. #11 |  Lefty | 

    As a liberal I’d rather see the ACLU go back to being apolitcal (as much as you can be anyway) and being absolutist about the 1st amendment.

  12. #12 |  Buddy Hinton | 

    The wrong-house-judge thing – “Deputies pulled out their weapons and began treating the family like criminals, even after Holmes identified herself as a judge, the family alleges.” Gee, “Don’t you know who I am?!?!” shows you EXACTLY the attitude of the system. I don’t CARE if you are a judge! It is COMPLETELY irrelevant! Either you are burglarizing the house, or you are not – how the police treat you should depend ENTIRELY on the fact of that issue, and what your day job is does not matter in the slightest. Judges can actually commit crimes, too, you know.

    One of the articles has the judge saying, at the scene, to the police that they have all appeared before her (with the implication being that they should recognize her personally). Also, one of the police did personally recognize her based on past face to face contact. This is not like some sports of Hollywood celeb saying “do you know who I am?!?!?” This is a more a matter of pointing out that a person should recognize you based on past encounters. It is understandable that the judge would try to be recognized in this manner. I would expect the janitor of the jailhouse, or the dry cleaner who does their dress blues, to identify in the same way and for the same good reasons.

    I think what the police will really get in trouble for is the “soaking her feet” comment. In non-emergency circumstances, police can make an appointment just like anybody else if they want an interview. To try, as the police report did try, to make her declining a spontaneous interview with the police into some kind of elitism issue and, at the same time, raising the somewhat embarrassing image of the judge with soaking feet, may very well rankle the judge more than the whole rest of it.

  13. #13 |  Mike Leatherwood | 

    Regarding the prostituion raid, a dynamic entry was definitely the right thing to do. Given time, the pimp could have easily flushed the hookers down the toilet, burned all the lingerie, and swalled the condoms full of….
    Nevermind.

  14. #14 |  Bart | 

    @ Deoxy The prostitution raid is very BAD.

    1. You don’t send a swat team after a 55 yr old man and his fiance engaged in prostitution.

    2. There was no effort made to determine who might be in the house before they sent the SWAT team. (i.e. cops don’t care who they are endangering – kids, innocent adults, pets, etc. or whose rights they may be trampling on.)

    3. Cops have access to everything you do online from your home computer. There is no privacy, and no rights protected here. People besides the 55 year old man were most likely using that internet connection at the home and the police get access to everything they are doing.

  15. #15 |  Nancy Lebovitz | 

    The comments to the link about the judge introduced me to http://www.injusticeeverywhere.com — it’s a daily newsfeed of justice system bad news in the US. It seems to have about a dozen items per day.

  16. #16 |  Nathan A | 

    I notice in the wrong-house raid story (oh, the one with the judge, not the other isolated incident linked this morning) the paper give due reference to the cops. The judge is named, the neighbor is named, the judge’s sister is named and her address is put out there.

    What of the thugs that “stormed her relative’s home”? We have BSO deputies, a BSO investigator, and a high-ranking BSO official. (An official? Not an officer? Huh?) Why are papers so free with the civilian’s information and so deferential to the ones in the wrong? Is this more professional courtesy?

    And the story still manages to get a few shots in at the judge for being pissed about the whole thing and refusing to simply submit. Good thing they didn’t have a dog around.

  17. #17 |  Yizmo Gizmo | 

    “Why are papers so free with the civilian’s information and so deferential to the ones in the wrong? Is this more professional courtesy?”

    Forget transparency, Sunshine laws my ass.
    It’s Florida. Any journo-punk that defies the Imperial Order
    and publishes Stormtroopers’ names will be in a “world of hurt, dude.”

  18. #18 |  Marty | 

    It’d be nice if the police union would file grievances against any cop who arrested anyone for a consensual crime. It seems kind of obvious that we should all be filing grievances for this nonsense.

  19. #19 |  awp | 

    Re: isolated incidents,

    what would be more likely to actually stop the stupid (over)use of dynamic entry?

    When they kill a kid?
    When they kill a officer of the law?
    When hell freezes over?

    I think these isolated incidents and the invincibility of cops are the most harmful and scariest things about our system today. Who will watch the watchers, and all that?
    Radley, Agitatortots, do you think there is any good way within the system to get these to stop? What can we do?

  20. #20 |  Deoxy | 

    @ Bart – yes, I agree with all of your points, but that doesn’t make this a good “wrong house” example or stat point, as the house actually did belong to the suspect. It’s a good example of over-use of SWAT and under-use Ye Olde “Stakeout” (that’s apparently too boring, or something?), not “wrong house”.

    This is not like some sports of Hollywood celeb saying “do you know who I am?!?!?” This is a more a matter of pointing out that a person should recognize you based on past encounters.

    That doesn’t matter any more than job or title.

    What matters is if the person is committing a crime, not if the person has some particularly job or title or if the cop knows them personally. The person’s “day job” or personal acquaintance with the officer(s) is COMPLETELY IRRELEVANT.

    Well, it’s irrelevant to justice… it’s clearly not irrelevant to most cops.

  21. #21 |  Buddy Hinton | 

    What matters is if the person is committing a crime, not if the person has some particularly job or title or if the cop knows them personally. The person’s “day job” or personal acquaintance with the officer(s) is COMPLETELY IRRELEVANT.

    Of course it matters. It matters because probable cause (which wasn’t established here to begin with) goes away as the “suspects” do things that are inconsistent with being burglars. Clearly identifying is one of those things.

    Of course, once probable cause is gone, so should be the police. Even if there was sufficient probable cause to order them around in the first place, the recognition of the judge took that away not because she was a judge, but because she was acting in a way a burglar would not act (that is, quickly providing a true identification of herself).

    Don’t get me wrong. It is still possible that the judge was the one burglarizing the neighbor’s house. It is possible that she was over at the other house b4 police got there and stole a bunch of stuff that the neighbor hasn’t yet realized has been stolen. Maybe she took his stash and he didn’t want to report that. Anything is possible, but that isn’t reasonable suspicion or probable cause. At best, it is a cause for police to do a type of investigation that does not yet involve any sort of searches and seizures.

    Police did a bad job “establishing” probable cause / exigent circumstances / reasonable fear for their safety in the first place, but they did an even worse job realizing when those partial licenses to search and seize (such as they were) ended. Ahnd when they end, police need to be out of there fast. No sweep. No taking 16 yo out out gunpoint. They need to leave just as fast as they would expect a suspect to comply with any lawful orders they give. That didn’t happen and that is a big problem.

    It is a bigger problem that they shaded their written report in ridiculous ways, but it is good to recognize and discuss all the problems with what police did here — starting with not communicating in a professional manner with the pointing neighbor.

    Do you know what lawyers do when a witness in a courtroom points and it is not absolutely clear whom they are pointing at?

    Little common sense here.

  22. #22 |  Matt in Cincy | 

    I didn’t read the wrong house raid story but it did make me think… have you ever heard people complain about how the news only reports airplane crashes, and never how many take off and land safely each day? Well Radley, all you do is report about botched home invasions… what about all the ones that are done correctly? Why don’t we ever hear about THOSE?

    Of course I’m joking…

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