Saturday Links

Saturday, April 23rd, 2011
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31 Responses to “Saturday Links”

  1. #1 |  ClubMedSux | 

    “He said the trouble arises when media reports refer to ‘Koch brothers.’ He figures the protesters are doing little research beyond a quick Google search.”

    Somehow I’m less than surprised…

  2. #2 |  bigjohn756 | 

    “…once we finally win the drug war.”

    Good one, Balko. Very funny. Thanks for starting my day off with a chuckle.

  3. #3 |  PW | 

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwqhdRs4jyA&feature=related

  4. #4 |  jay | 

    We must support our allies in Bahrain in these troubled times. They are a beacon of monarchy in a roiling sea of democratic movements.

  5. #5 |  Brandon | 

    “good to know those poor DEA agents will still have jobs once we finally win the drug war.”

    Should be any day now.

  6. #6 |  Fred | 

    Well… I buy the whole ‘as addictive as cocaine’ thing… because cocaine isn’t all that addictive.

  7. #7 |  Marty | 

    Roy Orbison was my mom’s favorite… very cool!

  8. #8 |  Rhayader | 

    The article on “wet houses” is pretty good as far as those things go. Still, I get tired of sentences like this:

    The question, here, is whether or not being a drunk is an essential component of a person’s identity…

    This is part of his comparison between treatment of sexual lifestyle choices and treatment of other lifestyle choices like drug intake. The whole idea is that, since sex is “an essential component of a person’s identity,” it is safe from government interference while other, less “essential” lifestyle choices are open to oppression. The author’s only response is some mealy-mouthed defense of alcoholism as genetic disorder.

    But that misses the whole point. Who decides what is essential to whom? Where is it written that the right to install a glory hole in one’s bedroom door is more “essential”, in every case, than the right to smoke a joint in one’s living room? It’s an astoundingly arrogant line of thinking, and unfortunately the author stoops down to answer to it.

  9. #9 |  Mannie | 

    The latest vice that causes a “cocaine-like addiction”: fatty foods.

    Then I guess cocaine isn’t all that bad.

  10. #10 |  Mike | 

    “Meanwhile, within the limits of their condition, drinkers attending facilities like St Anthony’s are surprisingly happy. And that, perhaps, is the problem. Hopeless drunks aren’t supposed to be happy: they’re supposed to suffer until they see the error of their ways and submit to a cure.”

    As a complete non-drinker (no religious or moral reasons, just don’t want to), I find that view horribly insulting. People doing what gives them pleasure are supposed to suffer? &^%$#@ that.

    From the article, the wet house provides these benefits:
    – No lying, stealing, etc to get a drink on
    – Better security, not lying in an alley passed out
    – Fewer ER visits
    – Drunks are not out in public bothering people

    However, there are some significant downsides.
    – (blank list)

    Like I said, I don’t drink at all. But I support this wet house project 100%. Let’s have more!

  11. #11 |  C. S. P. Schofield | 

    The older I get the more I am inclined to think that the addiction that harms society most is the addition for minding other peoples’ business.

  12. #12 |  EH | 

    CSP: Some say the addiction that most harms society is the desire to be led. Minding other peoples’ business follows from that. A lot of people hate seeing other people “led wrongly.” It’s a societal cancer.

  13. #13 |  Marty | 

    #11 and 12- well said on both counts.

    it’s interesting- as soon as one ‘ill’ is addressed through legislation, the busy-bodies have already lined up their next ’cause’… they’re never happy. These people just nag the joy out of living.

  14. #14 |  Thomas D | 

    http://www.lvrj.com/news/exclusive-police-beating-of-las-vegas-man-caught-on-tape-120509439.html?viewAllComments=y&c=y

  15. #15 |  Highway | 

    From Thomas D’s link:

    Allen Lichtenstein, an American Civil Liberties Union attorney, reviewed Crooks’ video and said Colling was clearly in the wrong. Officers are trained to avoid escalating situations, but Colling initiated the incident and created a physical confrontation without provocation, he said.

    Bull, they aren’t ‘trained to avoid escalating situations’. That’s all they ever do in these cases. That’s what SWAT teams do on their ‘tactical entries’. That’s what any cop that has *ever* gone over to someone filming police action from the sidewalk or across the street has ever done. They go over there with the intent of escalating the situation. Because if they didn’t want to escalate it, they’d just not go over there.

  16. #16 |  EH | 

    Highway, maybe Lichtenstein chose his words poorly, but police are indeed trained to de-escalate situations. That they do this by escalating first is a cultural problem.

  17. #17 |  boomshanka | 

    re: food addiction

    “Kenny says the findings shed light on the brain mechanisms that drive overeating and could even lead to new treatments for obesity.”

    Science is just so uncool.

  18. #18 |  BSK | 

    What if we flip the something-not-cocaine as bad as cocaine meme on its head: rather than saying, “Gosh, fatty foods must be terrible if they’re compared to cocaine!” we should say, “Hmmm, cocaine can’t be all that bad if it’s comparable to french fries.”

  19. #19 |  Henry Bowman | 

    Rad, thanks for the Roy Orbison link. Most pop singers have mediocre voices: Roy’s was truly great. He probably could have been an opera star with the right training.

  20. #20 |  Henry Bowman | 

    We must recognize that, in general, cops are thugs whom we hire to protect us from other thugs. Because they are thugs, we have to limit what they can do, both to other thugs as well as to ourselves. They should never have authority over those whom they supposedly serve! Until we recognize that they are basically scumbags, and treat them as such, we’ll always have problems.

  21. #21 |  BSK | 

    OT: http://www.cracked.com/article_19180_if-classic-fables-actually-told-truth-5Bcomic5D.html

    Funny in general, but a few seem particularly apt to the readers here, the golden goose one especially.

  22. #22 |  primus | 

    WHAT A BAND

  23. #23 |  Rune | 

    I knew there was something similar between coke and fatty foods. Like, when I have spent a night doing lines off the ass of a high class prostitute, I don’t have much of an appetite. The same is the case after I have scarfed down a large double whopper bacon cheese meal, I don’t feel great hunger. It’s the same!

  24. #24 |  Mattocracy | 

    Remember kids, the busy bodies hate us because we’re free. They hate freedom.

  25. #25 |  Mannie | 

    #15 | Highway | April 23rd, 2011 at 4:01 pm

    Bull, they aren’t ‘trained to avoid escalating situations’. That’s all they ever do in these cases. That’s what SWAT teams do on their ‘tactical entries’.

    Nah. When your children are proned out on the floor with gun muzzles in the backs of their heads, the dog is dead, and you are bleeding out on the rug, the situation is adequately de-escalated. This is forty three TWENTY seven Maple Street isn’t it? Oh, well.

  26. #26 |  damaged justice | 

    How science is done: Feed people fat and sugar. Observe they get fat and sick. Conclude that fat is unhealthy.

  27. #27 |  Pablo | 

    Interesting article on “wet houses.” I look at this issue about the same as I see needle exchange programs–if they are funded entirely with private donations they should be able to assist whoever and however they wish. But I think it is wrong to force any taxpayer to subsidize someone else’s addiction.

  28. #28 |  damaged justice | 

    Also how science is done: Feed people artificial fat. Observe they get sick. Conclude that natural fat is unhealthy.

  29. #29 |  Mattocracy | 

    How freedom is done. Don’t fuck with others when they’re only hurting themselves.

  30. #30 |  Mike | 

    Or: http://www.reddit.com/r/AskReddit/comments/gvhbg/would_you_still_masturbate_if_instead_of_millions/

  31. #31 |  Andrew Roth | 

    The First 48 followed a case in Louisville involving a group of mostly homeless alcoholics who were totally satisfied with their lifestyle. This bothered some of the homicide detectives, who thought that they ought to do something with their lives besides hanging out behind the railroad tracks drinking tall boys from the Bypass Liquor. As Det. Mickey Cohn put it, “I solve these cases for a living. You drink beer for a living.”

    These people were textbook examples of lazy, drunken bums who didn’t harm anyone. It seemed that the cops didn’t bother them, either, until one of them got murdered, but when the two cultures met some of the detectives could barely control their disdain for the lifestyle that their suspects had adopted.

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