Another Isolated Incident

Thursday, January 13th, 2011

Spring Valley, New York:

A village resident said that police conducting drug raids early this morning targeted the wrong house where they roused his family out bed, pointed a machine gun at his 13-year-old daughter and threatened to shoot their poodle…

David McKay said he, his wife, 13-year-old daughter and his brother-in-law were sleeping at 5:30 a.m. when they heard banging on the door of their townhouse at 36 Sharon Drive. When they went to open the door, at least 10 police officers forced their way into the home, he said.

“Their guns were drawn, they were screaming ‘Where’s Michael, Where’s Michael,’ ” McKay recounted hours later in a telephone interview from Nyack Hospital, where he took his terrified daughter for treatment after she had an asthma attack and fainted following the ordeal.

McKay said he was still groggy from sleep but tried to explain that there was no one named Michael in the house.

“They pulled me outside in the freezing cold in my underwear, manhandle my wife, point a gun at my daughter and they won’t even tell me what they are doing in my house,” said McKay. “It was terrifying and humiliating beyond belief.”

It was part of a broad joint federal/local drug sweep for pot involving more than 200 cops from at least 13 different government agencies. More:

McKay said the officers forced his wife, Jamie, and daughter out of their beds. The family’s dogs were barking and police threatened to shoot them, McKay said.

McKay said he was uncertain how long the police were in his home at 36 Sharon Drive, but at one point he heard them discussing a nearby residence. When he took the dogs out for a walk a short time later, he saw police in front of that home, located on the same side of the street.

When the police were preparing to leave, McKay and his bewildered family asked them again what they were doing and why they entered the house.

“They wouldn’t say,” he recalled. “All they would say was ‘You’ll read about it in the paper tomorrow.’ “

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33 Responses to “Another Isolated Incident”

  1. #1 |  CyniCAl | 

    “McKay said the officers forced his wife, Jamie, and daughter out of their beds. The family’s dogs were barking and police threatened to shoot them, McKay said.”

    Only an Agitator reader could think this: “Rather fortunate for the family, all in all.”

    Makes one wonder, why didn’t they shoot the dogs? One instance does not a trend make, but is the bad publicity having an effect?

    Will be watching out for future instances of police “restraint.”

  2. #2 |  Brandon | 

    They only threatened to shoot the poodle. Progress!

  3. #3 |  Nick | 

    This story sounds bogus to me. If this were a real story about a SWAT raid, the dog would be dead. Clearly they invented the whole thing.

  4. #4 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    PUT A MIC ON THOSE SWAT TEAMS!

    Of course that’s just one of many things that needs to be done.

  5. #5 |  Dante | 

    Dumb question, but do the police ever go to the correct house?

    Second question – why are we arming people with assault weapons if they cannot even muster the intelligence to look up the address and plug it into a GPS unit?

  6. #6 |  EH | 

    Of course they go to the correct house. All the time. Heck, there are probably a lot of dead dogs from arresting actual criminals, too, we just don’t hear about them.

    why are we arming people with assault weapons if they cannot even muster the intelligence to look up the address and plug it into a GPS unit?

    I’m sure they did look up the address. However, the address was probably given to them by a crackhead informer.

  7. #7 |  Matt | 

    Another dumb question, is there any excuse whatsoever for pointing a gun at someone who is not known to be a suspect, much less not known to be armed?

  8. #8 |  Discord | 

    “Another dumb question, is there any excuse whatsoever for pointing a gun at someone who is not known to be a suspect, much less not known to be armed?”

    Safety of police trumps all other considerations. Anyone of these pot dealers could be harboring terrorists, it happens all the time.

  9. #9 |  The Mossy Spaniard | 

    I got nothing. I think everything there is to say about this kind of thing has already been said.

    Damn it.

  10. #10 |  Robert Volk | 

    Wow, yet another another wrong address. Well, a little paid administrative leave will ensure it doesn’t happen again.

  11. #11 |  Dana Gower | 

    Among the agencies involved in making the arrests was the U.S. Postal Service. Even the postal service couldn’t find the right address?

  12. #12 |  André | 

    Involving 200 cops from 13 different agencies? All that overtime pay is totally worth it if we can keep a single person from getting high on something other than booze or tobacco.

  13. #13 |  :'( | 

    I don’t understand why the cops can threaten to kill someones dog (intimidation) point a gun at an innocent man (again i think intimidation or worse) point a gun at a 13 year old (i’m sure very illegal) and assault a 13 year old girl and a man and woman, yet there are no consequences? If a group of citizens did this, even with a good reason (say they thought these people robbed them) they would go to jail for decades.

    It’s time police are recognized as the criminals they are, and are put through the terrible justice system they support so much

  14. #14 |  Big A | 

    Sounds like the family is really upstanding too- foster parents, active in the community (actually recognized some of the cops from community activities), and works for the sewer dept. Doesn’t this stuff come up when they “check the address”? Also, I wonder if any of the cops recognized him and had that sinking feeling one gets right before realizing something has gone horribly wrong.

  15. #15 |  Gerald A | 

    “foster parents, active in the community”

    I know, he was lining up customers, yeah thats it. We’ll go with that story.

  16. #16 |  Buddy Hinton | 

    Interesting, semi-related:

    http://www.kztv10.com/news/disturbing-graffiti-left-at-swat-standoff-scene/

  17. #17 |  IrishMike | 

    “All they would say was ‘You’ll read about it in the paper tomorrow.’ “

    And will the presumably statist badge-licking paper mention that an innocent family was terrorized as part of this little operation?

  18. #18 |  croaker | 

    @15

    If the police continue to play their role as an army of occupation, don’t be surprised if the people play their part in turn. Vive le revolution.

  19. #19 |  FTP | 

    From the article Corpus Christi graffiti/SWAT story linked to by Buddy Hinton in post #15:
    “The implications are that they may be interested in killing a police officer and that’s attempted capital murder of a police officer, at least and we will be looking into those charges,” Ermis said.

    So implying that one may be interested in killing a police officer is enough to get one charged with attempting to kill a police officer? Doesn’t attempted murder require a certain amount of action on the part of the person being charged?

  20. #20 |  Buddy Hinton | 

    “overt act” might be the legal standard, although it has been a couple years since I say for my latest bar exam.

  21. #21 |  who gives a rat's ass? | 

    Fsck the goddann ahhsoles.

    FSCK THEM ALL – GET OUT OF MY HOUSE, SCUM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  22. #22 |  Joe | 

    We need to rein this shit in. These Gestapo raids have to stop. Either that or make them subject to civil lawsuits if they screw up. I am sick of it.

  23. #23 |  Joe | 

    Oh did I use hate speech and violate Godwin’s law by comparing these officers to Gestapo? My bad. I get that way when I think of strangers manhandling my wife, pointing guns at the heads of my children and threatening to shoot my dog.

  24. #24 |  Dave Krueger | 

    Interesting. In this post, there is none of that vitriolic language that’s been in the headlines since the Arizona shooting. There is no name calling. Nothing about distrusting the government. No talk of targeting anyone. No finger pointing by one party about how the other party is wrecking the country. Nothing about a “Second Amendment solution”. No “Don’t Tread on Me” symbolism. Nothing about watering the tree of liberty with the blood of tyrants. Just a simple news item reporting an increasingly common event in an ordinary American city involving ordinary American citizens in their own ordinary American homes.

    So, would someone please explain to me why jaw is tensely locked, my fists clenched tight, and my heart pounding in my chest?

    I think the media and politicians have it backwards. The vitriolic rhetoric is not inciting anger. The anger is inciting vitriolic rhetoric. And swearing to tone down the language isn’t going to do a goddamn thing to quell the anger.

    The politicians don’t get it. People are not falling for the line anymore that everything is fine. They might not have any answers, but at least they know something’s wrong. Of course, the politicians are banking on the current dark mood as being temporary, so for them it’s business as usual.

  25. #25 |  Pinandpuller | 

    People need to do more research when buying houses, apparently: http://www.elliswinters.co.uk/news/Company-News-16/articles/Whats-in-a-number-101146.aspx

  26. #26 |  Rick H. | 

    #25 appears to be an off-topic link to a javascript-laden spam hole… apparently.

  27. #27 |  Greg | 

    Dave,

    I’m just taking a shot in the dark, but I’d be willing to proffer that your jaw is locked, your fists are clenched, and your heart is pounding really, really hard because you paid attention in that 8th grade civics class you had to take and pass to get to HS. It actually took, and you learned why the colonists revolted.

    Perhaps, a parent/grandparent shared the moments of grace and horror they experienced in WWI/II. That they wouldn’t wish those moments on anyone, that they would do it all over. That those wars were truly worth fighting, and though we too did some terrible shit, we generally upheld the ideals of our Great Nation and were the better men.

    Perhaps your family has been in this country since it was ‘The Colonies’ and political discourse has been part of every gathering since the 1600s.

    Maybe you just completed your requirements for citizenship, and having been duly sworn are taking that oath seriously.

    Personally, I don’t think it matters much exactly what the causality is as you are having the correct reaction. I’m just thankful that you believe in the promise of our Constitutional Republic and remember that evil always triumphs when good men do nothing.

    As someone who has spent wayyyy too much time reading letters and speeches from the Founding Fathers, I can safely say that most of them would be rather at home here…

  28. #28 |  CyniCAl | 

    #24 | Dave Krueger — “I think the media and politicians have it backwards.”

    No one thinks wet sidewalks cause rain more than statists. It’s axiomatic.

  29. #29 |  Gordon | 

    Yeah, I have pretty much the same reaction as Dave. It is all too easy to imagine ourselves and our loved ones physically attacked like that.

    And yeah, Greg, I, too, was naive enough to actually believe the things I was taught in civics class lo those many years ago. Crazy thing is, I *still* do — I just no longer believe that the political class we have now does.

    QFT:
    “No one thinks wet sidewalks cause rain more than statists. It’s axiomatic.”

  30. #30 |  J.S. | 

    Indeed Dave. Its like violent tv, movies and video games are the problem! Ban them! Ban angry speech! Speak in soft dulcet tones, think of a calm blue ocean while we shoot your poodle. Oh, and let them feel up your wife after an x-ray scan. All is well!

    It couldn’t be reading, watching, living through an out of control government and “law enforcement” agencies getting people a mite touchy. No sirree bub, its that doom game or terminator on the ‘ol boob tube.

  31. #31 |  Brian | 

    Wonder what would happen if someone went knocking on the lead SWAT officer’s door at 5 AM, forced his family outside at gunpoint and threatened to shoot his dogs. I get the impression he finds that sort of behavior acceptable.

  32. #32 |  Dana Gower | 

    This was on the same Web site as the graffiti story. Apparently, the government has wasted a bunch of money on the x-ray scanners, since the TSA is just doing actual strip searches now.

    http://www.caller.com/news/2011/jan/13/amarillo-woman-receives-settlement-corpus-christi/?partner=popular

    CORPUS CHRISTI — An Amarillo woman who claimed her breasts were exposed during a search at the Corpus Christi International Airport will receive an undisclosed settlement from the federal government.
    Lynsie Paige Murley filed a lawsuit last year claiming that a Transportation Security Administration employee pulled down her blouse and exposed her breasts during a May 29, 2008 incident.

  33. #33 |  Comment of the Day | The Agitator | 

    […] In response to my post about yet another mistaken drug raid, in which police pointed their guns at a 13-year-old girl, threatened to shoot the family dogs, then, when they asked what had happened, told the victims to “read about it in the paper tomorrow,” Dave Kruger writes: In this post, there is none of that vitriolic language that’s been in the headlines since the Arizona shooting. There is no name calling. Nothing about distrusting the government. No talk of targeting anyone. No finger pointing by one party about how the other party is wrecking the country. Nothing about a “Second Amendment solution”. No “Don’t Tread on Me” symbolism. Nothing about watering the tree of liberty with the blood of tyrants. Just a simple news item reporting an increasingly common event in an ordinary American city involving ordinary American citizens in their own ordinary American homes. […]

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