Grandpa Killed in Drug Raid

Thursday, January 6th, 2011

Still light on details at the moment, but it looks like we have another innocent man gunned down in a botched drug raid.

The 68-year-old grandfather of 12 who was killed yesterday by a Framingham police SWAT team in an early-morning drug raid was a retired MBTA worker described by shocked neighbors as the “nicest guy in the world.”

Eurie Stamps was not the target of the search warrant, according to the Middlesex District Attorney’s Office, and his death at the hands of police is under investigation.

Authorities said Stamps lived at the house with a woman whose son and another man were arrested in the raid on drug charges…

Police wouldn’t say whether the shooting was justified. No weapons were recovered from the home, prosecutors said, and the suspects do not face weapons charges.

After Stamps was shot, police called an ambulance and gave him first aid, authorities said.

Joseph Bush fan, 20, the son of Stamps’ com panion, Norma Bushfan, was arrested outside the house as police initiated the raid. Bushfan allegedly was carrying eight baggies of crack and $400 in cash. Devon Talbert, 20, was arrested in a rear bedroom.

More to come, I’m sure.

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52 Responses to “Grandpa Killed in Drug Raid”

  1. #1 |  Nick T. | 

    Let’s all try really hard not to jump to conclusions, but suffice to say, there had better be a really sensatonally good explanation for why an innocent onld man is dead in his own home.

    As always, even a justified shooting based on confusion (or even a weird hatred for cops) has nothing to do with the greater issue of the fact that this man is dead because we’ve decided to use violence, force and confinement to deal with people wanting to get high.

  2. #2 |  Steve Verdon | 

    Don’t even know why they pretend to investigate anymore. The police will be found to have acted within policy, they did a good job, and should get a commendation.

  3. #3 |  CyniCAl | 

    This is as appropriate an Agitator post to offer the words of Butler Shaffer as any other:

    “The state is an entity that enjoys a monopoly on the use of violence within a given territory. Because of this generally accepted definition, the idea that individuals have any rightful claim to immunity from state violence would, of necessity, be regarded as a limitation on such monopoly power. It borders on sedition to suggest that there are any restraints on the arbitrariness of governmental force. This is why those who engage in unprovoked wars, police brutalities, unlawful searches and seizures of property, the tasering of harmless individuals, and numerous other offenses, are almost never held to account for their wrongs. In the eyes of state officials – be they prosecuting attorneys, judges, or elected politicians – such acts cannot be thought of as “wrongs,” lest the state be deprived of its essence as a “violence monopolist.”

    http://www.lewrockwell.com/shaffer/shaffer226.html

    All you who support the State, be honest about what it is you support.

  4. #4 |  Steve Verdon | 

    Nick T.

    Nice to see someone parroting the “official” line.

  5. #5 |  MacGregory | 

    When the premise is faulty, all subsequent actions are therefore by definition, douchebaggery.

  6. #6 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    I’m pretty sure that if they actually find drugs, they can line everyone up against a wall and execute them. Tough to get a conviction against SWAT if you have no drugs/guns, video of you surrendering, and it’s the wrong house.

  7. #7 |  SJE | 

    Not to defend the cops, but my old man is 67 and could probably kill most people without a gun.

  8. #8 |  CyniCAl | 

    In this everlasting War on Drugs (People), how does one go about negotiating the unconditional surrender of the American people to the proper authorities? Maybe an armistice? A cease-fire? Something? Anything?

    Not sure about all of you, but I’m worn out and I’m all out of ideas.

  9. #9 |  ktc2 | 

    There were drugs in the house (planted or not) therefore everyone in the house deserves to be shot.

    At least that’ll be the badgelicker line.

  10. #10 |  Matt | 

    You guys don’t want to read the comments to that news story. Suffice to say, while the drug war may be lawless and evil, you can’t say it’s undemocratic.

  11. #11 |  Comrade Dread | 

    All the violence, death, loss of liberty, and empowering of gangs and terrorists is worth it if we can just keep one hippie from getting high, man.

  12. #12 |  ceanf | 

    a life taken so these pigs could get 8 bags of crack and $400. sure sounds like these kids was a kingpins! they sure are doing god’s work out there on the streets of framingham…

    we all know what the outcome of this state sponsored murder will be… officers found justified in the killing and a probable attempt to place the blame on the deceased.

  13. #13 |  C. S. P. Schofield | 

    Since there is nothing the Law ‘n Order types resent more than ridicule, how about somebody starts working on “Gran’paw got run over in a drug raid” to the tune of “Grandma got run over by a reindeer”.

  14. #14 |  Nick T. | 

    #4 @ Steve V.

    Not sure exactly what you mean, but lest you think I’m somehow defending this garbage, I merely suggesting we don’t jump to any conclusions about anything – it seem Radley is taking the same approach. Just because cops jump to conclusions all the time, doesn’t mean those of us who want to hold them accountable should/can as well.

    I think if you look at the rest of my comment, it’s clear I’m not hopeful or expectant of evidence the police acted reasonably or legally, and I’ve articulated a very high standard. So if that’s what you meant by “official line” I think I would also need to throw in some garbage about how tough a job it is and demand that anyone who wants to criticize the cops put themselves in the same position or some such bullshit.

    Of course jumping to the conclusion that the police “investigation” will yield nothing but a bunch of pats on the back is completely justified because while occassionally police use force with cause, the internal reviews are *always* a joke.

  15. #15 |  CyniCAl | 

    Interesting situation in Tucumcari, NM, where some of you will remember the case of the police chief tasing a 14-year-old female epileptic in the brain. The police chief has been fired by the city manager, and predictably, he is suing to get his job back. It appears that one of the reasons he was fired was for failing to establish a permanent residence in the city, so I wouldn’t jump to the conclusion that the city manager has any regard for civil liberties.

    http://www.cnjonline.com/articles/hatcher-36899-tucumcari-chief.html

    Still, for a LEO chief executive to be axed, that is a rare occurrence indeed and worth remarking on.

  16. #16 |  CyniCAl | 

    Should have checked the dateline on the above story, damn, it’s old news.

  17. #17 |  IrishMike | 

    While some of the comments to the article are infuriatingly badgelicky (coming to Webter’s in 2012) there are many that are quite reasonable. I may be seeing what I want to see but it seems to me that as these types of injustices get more press (thank you Radley, the internets, cell phone cameras…) the tide is turning when it comes to public reaction. Comment sections used to be 90/10 badgelicker/reasonable or worse. Dare I say that nowadays it might be more like 60/40? Still sad but these battles are almost always won incrementally rather than in one fell swoop.

  18. #18 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    Not sure about all of you, but I’m worn out and I’m all out of ideas.

    1. Bet against the US. Short everything about the Empire.
    2. Get a union job with the state. Best if it is one where they give you a gun. Take lots of showers.
    3. See if the next generation can do better.

    Hey, I already admitted I’m lazy.

  19. #19 |  Michael | 

    This could simply be one union cutting back on the pension demands of another.

  20. #20 |  Dave Krueger | 

    #2 Steve Verdon

    Don’t even know why they pretend to investigate anymore. The police will be found to have acted within policy, they did a good job, and should get a commendation.

    I think we should look for the good in all things. For example, cops seem to be more cautious about blurting out a story that clears the cops immediately after the event like they used to back in the old days before the proliferation of video cameras. I think they are waiting to see if anyone comes forward with video and then concoct their story to fit. I think this proves that cops can learn from their mistakes.

    Everyone please take note that, in the interest of fairness, I’m making a concerted effort to avoid being negative about cops all the time.

  21. #21 |  Maria | 

    I do wonder if the old guy thought they where being robbed? Not the first time that has happened.

  22. #22 |  Dave Krueger | 

    It kind of makes you wonder if the warrants they issue actually tell the cops to arrest so-and-so and then kill any witnesses.

  23. #23 |  Aresen | 

    Just once, I would like to see one of these stories end with:

    “Officers X, Y and Z have been charged with negligent homicide. Prosecutor W has been charged with suborning perjury in obtaining the affidavit used to support the warrant. Judge T has been suspended from the bench for not exercising proper oversight in the issuance of the warrant.

    [I know it won't happen, but it would be nice.]

  24. #24 |  Mike Leatherwood | 

    “More to come, I’m sure.”

    No, no there won’t.

    Coverup Investigation in progress.

    Move along.

  25. #25 |  Dave Krueger | 

    So, just to make sure I understand. There were no weapons found? Does that mean the cops used up all their throw-downs earlier in the shift? Or did they just fuck up and forget to bring any?

  26. #26 |  Mike Leatherwood | 

    Coverup was supposed to be strikethrough *sigh* We need a preview button, pls.

  27. #27 |  sigh | 

    “After Stamps was shot, police called an ambulance and gave him first aid, authorities said.”

    This is an admission of at least “oh shit”, if not outright guilt, in 20 foot tall flaming letters. Most departments do not administer aid to “bad guys” they just shot as a matter of SOP. If they’re actually worried about the guy they lit up, then it was likely either an accident or obviously a bad shoot immediately after the fact.

  28. #28 |  Aresen | 

    Mike L

    “Coverup Investigation” makes perfect sense in this context.

  29. #29 |  Pete | 

    A conclusion I can absolutely jump to based on this and other similar stories is that it is just goddamn not appropriate to use a military force to tactically enter a home like their invading a nest of insurgents in Baghdad, and only come up with a small baggy of crack and $400. This was small-time.

    It’s ALWAYS small-time. The kinds of drug raids they originally said SWAT would be for… when do we get to hear about those on the news? “SWAT surrounds suspected high-level drug player’s distribution operation, exchanges gunfire with 17 well-armed thugs.”

    Instead it’s SWAT terrorizes three year old baby and shoots her dog, or her.

    Not. Appropriate. Seriously, this just needs to stop.

  30. #30 |  David Chesler | 

    The original reports were that one of the SWAT guys’ guns “discharged”. It wasn’t the cop, it was his gun.
    Three times, apparently.
    My city, about 15 miles northeast of there, is still in mourning because a cop (and the armed robber who shot him) was killed on December 26. The thick blue line turned out by the thousands to his funeral. I wonder how many will come to Stamps’ funeral.

  31. #31 |  Marc | 

    What would you do if you hear someone knock in your back door un-announced “no-knock raid” and maybe you have kids and a wife to protect? You let SWAT kill you because you pull a gun – and you should be happy they saved the day. They are true heroes. (sarcasm)

  32. #32 |  Marc | 

    EDIT: Meant to say “kick” in your back door.

  33. #33 |  André | 

    I might be the only one, but i keep reading badgelicker as badgerlicker. Does this happen to anybody else?

  34. #34 |  Aresen | 

    Andre:

    NO.

    Also: There may be laws against that in your state.

    ;P

  35. #35 |  Sinchy | 

    Can anyone with law enforcement experience explain why it is better to storm a house than to wait until the suspect leaves the house and snatch him? Then conduct the search. Either way you could have the element of surprise but without the danger of entering a building where you don’t know who is inside with what fire power.

  36. #36 |  Sinchy | 

    BTW, any updates on the case where the 7 yrs old girl was shot in the head after the flash bang set her on fire? I forget the name of that girl or where it happened.

  37. #37 |  albatross | 

    Pete:

    At a guess, it’s always small time guys because they’re the ones who are easy to find, and there are a lot of them.

    Nick T at the beginning has it right. The main issue here isn’t the brutality or carelessness of the police, it’s the policy decision to use SWAT teams and no-knock raids on small-time drug cases. With the most careful, honest, decent policemen imaginable, this decision would lead to tragic deaths, because no-knock raids by guys in body armor and carrying guns are just an inherently dangerous thing to do; there are dozens of ways things can go wrong.

    Now, substitute policemen who aren’t all that well-trained or careful, add in a culture of impunity, prosecutors and judges who are none too careful about what warrants they request/issue, shake well, and you get the current situation.

    There’s a really simple solution here–SWAT teams and no-knock raids should be reserved for extremely rare crises, the kind that might happen a dozen times a year even in a medium-sized city. This doesn’t require replacing the police with better police, or fixing the culture of impunity, or addressing the conflict of interest involved in having police departments investigate themselves and prosecutors who work with those police every day having to charge them. It could probably be done state by state, so that the whole country could see the impact of doing it in Hawaii or Oregon or wherever.

  38. #38 |  MassHole | 

    Don’t despair too much about the comments on the story. The Herald is a rag and the comments are well known to be full of mouth breathers. It will be interesting to see how this turns out. There is a surprising amount of (well deserved) skepticism regarding the police around here, so we may be surprised.

    At first blush, it certainly seems like a negligent discharge by a careless or poorly trained officer. The bottom line is that once you point a firearm at a person, you are threatening their life. Police and the public are way too cavalier about that.

  39. #39 |  Mike T | 

    It’s ALWAYS small-time. The kinds of drug raids they originally said SWAT would be for… when do we get to hear about those on the news? “SWAT surrounds suspected high-level drug player’s distribution operation, exchanges gunfire with 17 well-armed thugs.”

    That’s because for every Pablo Escobar, there are 1,000 Bushfan level dealers.

    Two cops with Benelli combat shotguns could have easily jumped these punks on the street with no casualties.

  40. #40 |  Gonzo | 

    @30

    And pretty well fucked traffic over on 93 that weekend. More so than usual, I mean.

  41. #41 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    A conclusion I can absolutely jump to based on this and other similar stories is that it is just goddamn not appropriate to use a military force to tactically enter a home like their invading a nest of insurgents in Baghdad

    Been saying the same thing since Waco.

  42. #42 |  André | 

    @Mike T

    The other factor is that it’s a lot, lot easier to arrest the Bushfan level people. If you have quotas and you spend a month working your way up to a high-level dealer, you get a handful of arrests out of it and maybe a decent haul of drugs. Bust small-time dealers and users, and you could get dozens every month. Which looks better on a performance review to someone who only skims your report?

  43. #43 |  Highway | 

    Can anyone with law enforcement experience explain why it is better to storm a house than to wait until the suspect leaves the house and snatch him? Then conduct the search. Either way you could have the element of surprise but without the danger of entering a building where you don’t know who is inside with what fire power.

    Sinchy,

    The ‘official’ rationales given for the need for raids range from “We need to make sure we have the element of surprise” to “We need to present overwhelming force” to “We need to hit them fast so they don’t see us coming and flush the evidence”.

    All of these are shown to be a lie when circumstances come up that impede their raid. If there are any shots back at them prior to entering, they’ll either fall back and set up a siege. The ‘evidence’ that they are getting is either so penny-ante that it could be flushed (in which case why are ‘we’ as a society bothering) or if it’s actually significant there’s no way they could dispose of it in anything less than half a day.

    The ‘real’ reasons they do these raids? They get to play dress up cops and robbers, just like they did when they were 8. They get to pretend they’re in the army special forces. They get to dominate other people. And maybe they get to shoot something or someone.

  44. #44 |  TC | 

    Could have been about like this one.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WV6Bq8xeQrU&feature=player_embedded

  45. #45 |  David Chesler | 

    @38 it was messed up inside Woburn too. The library was closed “out of respect” on New Year’s eve eve, so they used the parking lot as staging for the cop buses.
    Officer Maguire was by all accounts a good guy, but people are using his death for various political gains, mainly against parole but also in favor of cops shooting first and asking questions later, because there is at least one person who would shoot a cop.

    @36, your gun, your responsibility.

    And why do these SWAT teams, and high security details, feel they have to have assault rifles? Do they expect they’ll need suppressive fire against an attack by a German regiment? (As a regular reader, I’m sure the answer is because like the jungle camo, it looks cool. Sigh.)

  46. #46 |  Pablo | 

    There was an officer killed here in Atlanta recently during a traffic stop. It was a real tragedy, no evidence of any misconduct on his part, and his killer was a career criminal with multiple felony convictions. There has been the predictable outrage e.g. “why was this scumbag walking around free?” and calls to revamp yet again the court system. What people seem to be missing is that no one, and I mean NO ONE, can predict future dangerousness or other future behavior. Psychiatrists and psychologists spend decades studying human behavior and they still cant predict it accurately. Yet the public expects judges to be able to look at someone for a few minutes, read his rap sheet, and decide how dangerous he is before setting bond. The only way to prevent convicted criminals from harming anyone ever again is to lock up, for life, everyone convicted of a crime. (I hope I dont give anyone ideas.)

    This killing is just sad. Im withholding judgement until more facts are in but it sounds like another Sal Culosi incident–cop hyped up on adrenaline who can’t follow Rule 3 of gun safety.

  47. #47 |  Mike T | 

    #42,

    It doesn’t help the local police that it’s mainly the feds that handle the big drug cases. Between Customs and DEA, there’s not much “big work” left for the locals to fight over.

  48. #48 |  André | 

    Exactly. And it’s a lot of work to find burglars or violent criminals, and establishing guilt requires dumb crooks or substantial evidence. With drugs, all you have to do is produce something that looks like weed and a test that confirms that. Easy peasy lemon squeezy. Again, the numbers are involved here.

  49. #49 |  DEA | 

    Lol the American’s think wikileaks is the real threat, when in reality the DEA is a bigger threat to society.

  50. #50 |  Steve Verdon | 

    Nick T.,

    The official line is “never rush to a conclusion” which translates as “wait till we can find a way to justify this (and lets hope to God there is no independent video…and if SWAT team has any video quick go delete it).” Sure details are light, but if the targets of the raid are arrested outside the house, then why continue with the highly volatile and dangerous raid on the house? Cause its fun? Practice? There might be a highly trained gang land covert-ops unit in there waiting to strike to free the two drug dealers?

  51. #51 |  Nick T. | 

    Steve,

    I agree with all of that, and that’s not what I meant when I said let’s try not to jump to conclusions. Sorry I wasn’t clearer. This behavior is senseless at its inception and I find it outrageous as a matter of policy, as I stated.

  52. #52 |  Mrs. C | 

    # 46 Thank you for remembering what they caused to happen to my son and our family.

    We are scheduled to be in court on January 18, 2011…and it will be 5 years on January 24, 2011 that Sal was shot and killed, having been put in harms way, as the operation that was planned and carried out by the FCPD detectives and other law enforcement officers, used a SWAT team whose method of operation, is to use speed, surprise, and violence of action in a show of unnecessary and excessive force in our case while attempting to serve my son with a routine document search warrant for gambling.

    My son had no criminal record, was non threatening, never owned a weapon, therefore was unarmed, and was assessed by the FCPD as a low risk, but none of these factors mattered to SWAT officers, who said they don’t regard risk assessments, if they are called on, they go out at ready gun, with a loaded weapon, pointed at center mass of whomever they are to confront. So yes, they as that time, and I don’t know if that has changed, routinely ignored that 3rd cardinal rule of gun safety.

    A buy bust vehicle take down which is highly volatile, and is used for high risk drug deals was nevertheless used as part of their plan too. They used this dynamic show of force because they wanted to frighten, intimidate, and manipulate my son if they could; because they were led by a ulterior motive that set the stage in this over the top tactic, which then resulted in the wrongful killing of my son.

    I can only hope for justice…but if it should elude us…there is a God…and they will in time have to be accountable to Him…for whatever role each played…in putting into motion all the elements…that then allowed and caused…His 5th Commandment…to be broken by them.

    All life is precious…unique…and irreplaceable…and we all need to value and respect it.

    I grieve for my son, who is dearly loved and missed…and I offer my sympathy and condolences to this family…in the loss of their loved one…because their family too…will now be forever changed.

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