Morning Links

Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010
  • Obama administration cheers Prop 19’s defeat. Assholes.
  • Meanwhile, there’s yet more evidence that Portugal’s decriminalization efforts have been a success.
  • John Cole is upset about Russ Feingold’s defeat (for the record, I am too). So he blames . . . Reason magazine.  Sure, John. That makes perfect sense. Have another drink.
  • Memos detail TSA officer’s hilarious antics of planting fake cocaine on passengers, then chuckling at the terrified looks on their faces. Note that only one coworker turned him in. Prior stories also pointed out how we weren’t permitted to know how this particular worker was disciplined, thanks to the privacy protections afforded to federal employees. Good to know that as TSA workers go through your bags, pat you down, and gaze at your naked body, the government will protect their privacy should they do something inappropriate.
  • Virgin snake has 22 offspring. I’m sure there’s a sacrilegious joke in here somewhere.

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69 Responses to “Morning Links”

  1. #1 |  Arthur | 

    #12 | Lucy |

    + 200

  2. #2 |  Cynical in CA | 

    #37 | MacGregory — “I surely wish prop 19 had passed. If, for no other reason, to gauge the reaction of the feds and the neighboring states. I suspect it would have been a marvelous lesson in how much your vote really matters.”

    Great comment. Arousing the ire of the sovereign is always a bad idea, unless you think you’re strong enough to overthow the sovereign. That’s why I opposed Prop 19, not just in general principle against electoral politics, but because it was atrocious game theory.

    My life hasn’t changed one iota since yesterday. Don’t see any change on the horizon neither.

  3. #3 |  Cynical in CA | 

    #42 | KBCraig — “Prop 19 needlessly divided the pro-legalization camp into factions. Many people do not want to treat it like alcohol, with taxation and regulation; they just want it to no longer be illegal. I’m 100% for legalization, but if I lived in California, I would have thought long and hard whether or not to vote for it.”

    I commented earlier on a different thread that voting makes enemies of people who should be your friends. What a mess this prohibition is — all to fund the extremely wealthy and politically-connected. Blood money. It will only end when Americans have had enough of the violence.

  4. #4 |  Rhayader | 

    @Cynical: That’s why I opposed Prop 19, not just in general principle against electoral politics, but because it was atrocious game theory.

    So what’s the better approach? I’m honestly asking, not being snarky. I don’t see this happening as a top-down thing.

  5. #5 |  André | 

    #49: Exactly.

    Republicans talking to voters about limited government
    is like
    Lucy van Pelt talking to Charlie Brown about letting him kick the football.

  6. #6 |  ClubMedSux | 

    For those of you who are familiar with the episode of the Simpsons that parodies Cape Fear, there’s a scene at the end where Bart tries to escape from the houseboat the family’s living on. He runs to the front to find angry alligators in the water. Then he runs to the back and sees electric eels in the water. Then he runs back to the front of the boat and, upon re-discovering the alligators, deadpans “oh yeah…” I feel like that’s the electorate. We elect the Republicans in 2000 and they suck. So in 2008 we vote them out and elect Obama and the Democrats. Now after two years of failure we go back to the Republicans. It’ll just be a matter of time before we have our “oh yeah” moment and remember why we voted the Republicans out in the first place. And then, predictably, we’ll turn back to the Democrats. Sigh.

  7. #7 |  Aresen | 

    @ ClubMedSux

    So, do you think we can get Barry O to do a solo performance of the entire libretto of Pirates of Penzance?

  8. #8 |  Aresen | 

    OOPS. s/b HMS Pinafore

  9. #9 |  Joe | 

    #25 | Radley Balko | November 3rd, 2010 at 11:16 am
    Reason had no allegiance to Tea Party candidates. You won’t find any endorsement of Angle or O’Donnell or Paladino or Miller. Rand Paul is the only one who got some favorable coverage, and even that got more critical as he distanced himself from libertarian positions. If you look at who Reason staffers voted for in 2008 (Google it), about a third of the full time staff voted for Obama, about a third for Barr, and about a third didn’t vote. No full-time staffer voted for McCain. Cole trots out the GOP shill line because he’s too lazy (or busy raising money for Democrats — most of whom oppose the very civil liberties he’s criticizing us for endorsing) to address any of the actual arguments we make.

    +31

    Okay. Why no one for McCain? McCain was definitely a flawed candidate, but obviously so was Obama. Why not everyone at Reason on the Barr band wagon? Or putting in Ron Paul as a write in. Why a third for Obama and none for McCain? Obviously that no one supported the GOP nominee shows you guys are not shills for the GOP (how anyone could suggest you are is a bit of a stretch) but shouldn’t Reason, as a magazine of the independents and libertarians, reflect more diversity in political thought than it does? Hey, many Republicans winced when they voted for McCain and many voted for Barr like you did. I am not suggesting you should go out and quota hire Republicans or suggest how people who work for you vote, but does that voting record suggest a bias?

    I am not being accusatory here. But I think it does raise a legitimate question. How many people work for Reason? 30 to 50? I would think it is a big enough pool that one or two would have gone for McCain.

  10. #10 |  Cynical in CA | 

    #54 | Rhayader — “So what’s the better approach [to repeal of marijuana prohibition]? I’m honestly asking, not being snarky. I don’t see this happening as a top-down thing.”

    I agree completely. It would succeed at the grass roots. Literally. Everyone should just grow their own. As with any mass revolt against the sovereign, how are they going to arrest everyone?

    It may be that marijuana prohibition is never repealed. But that will in no way limit its production and consumption. Those who desire freedom will find a way to be free, and it won’t be by supplicating the sovereign.

  11. #11 |  Dave Krueger | 

    The Tea Party is really just a bunch of disgruntled Republicans. Once the primaries are over, there is no doubt how they will vote. What they really need to do it start a real independent third party. First, it would give them a friggin’ taste of just how badly the cards are stacked against such an option, second, it would scare the piss out of the Republicans, and third, they could actually attract more democrats into their midst because they wouldn’t be saddled with the obvious fact that they are nothing but a bunch of Republicans.

    Oops. I guess I just named three reasons why the Tea Party will never be anything more than a bunch of Republicans.

  12. #12 |  Radley Balko | 

    I am not being accusatory here. But I think it does raise a legitimate question. How many people work for Reason? 30 to 50? I would think it is a big enough pool that one or two would have gone for McCain.

    Reason has around 10 full-time staffers and interns at any given time. As for why no one voted for McCain, Google the article and read for yourself. General consensus was that the Republicans had had power for most of the decade and did virtually nothing with it that libertarians could support.

  13. #13 |  Joe | 

    Fair enough, a staff of ten is too small a pool to draw any broad conclusions. I was surprised not that McCain was in the minority at Reason but that no one voted for him. So basically out of a staff of 10 approximately three went for Obama, three went for Barr, and the rest did not vote.

    As for not rewarding the GOP after it failed to follow its own stated principals for eight years–well that is why the GOP lost the House and Senate in 2006 and why they lost the White House in 2008. They brought it on themselves.

  14. #14 |  zendingo | 

    although i hear a lot of prop 19 supporters claiming some sort of victory in its defeat, i think that it’s actually a devastating blow to ending the prohibition of cannabis.

    the reality is there is really good chance that steve cooley will be the next attorney general of ca, if this happens it’s almost a guaranteed that he will do everything in his power to bust legit growers (by legit i mean people who do not grow for violent cartels) and close as many dispensaries as possible. even though it might not look like it now, if cooley wins access to medical marijuana is going to get a lot harder in ca.

  15. #15 |  delta | 

    #60: “It would succeed at the grass roots. Literally. Everyone should just grow their own. As with any mass revolt against the sovereign, how are they going to arrest everyone?

    It may be that marijuana prohibition is never repealed. But that will in no way limit its production and consumption. Those who desire freedom will find a way to be free, and it won’t be by supplicating the sovereign.”

    This is the very worst game theory imaginable. It’s like anti-game-theory. What, there’s like 800,000 arrests annually for marijuana possession? How exactly do those people keep their freedom?

    See also: “United we stand, divided we fall.” Or: “When they came for me, there was no one left to speak out for me.” Actions in isolation get nothing accomplished politically. Almost by definition, only organized action does. This is the absolutely worst Achilles heel of the whole Ayn Rand-libertarian wing.

  16. #16 |  JOR | 

    “This is the absolutely worst Achilles heel of the whole Ayn Rand-libertarian wing.”

    Ayn Rand was an arch-centralist. And in many ways she was more statist than the standard-issue Republican or Democrat (she had what can only be described as a theological commitment to the US military, in particular, which perhaps explains her completely irreconcilable attitudes towards American Indian dispossession and black slavery; Amerinds were a group her God fought against, and black slaves were a group her God fought in favor of, at least indirectly).

  17. #17 |  Lucy | 

    The best part of that reason voting survey was how many people picked Wilson as the worse president ever.

    Also because it was the way I found out my father hadn’t voted in eight years (not since Harry Browne, I guess.)

    I was disgusted by Obama long ago, but it’s not that hard to figure out that even some true libertarians held their noses and said, this is for civil liberties when McCain didn’t even have that (vain) hope.

  18. #18 |  Max | 

    extremely OT: have any of u read Rohan Nation by Drew Miller ( he lives in the same area I do & gave a talk at a Tea party mting)? Anyway, is this an accurate representation of libertarian beliefs?

  19. #19 |  RobZ | 

    ““In other news, Obama continues to be a huge hypocrite.”

    Only now, he’s a huge hypocrite spending $200 million a day on a personal vacation. I’ve been boggling at that number for the last couple of hours.”

    If only you’d attempted to verify the figure, you could have saved yourself a whole lot of boggling.