Morning Links

Monday, November 1st, 2010
  • Here is a compilation of people doing awesome things, set to cheesy music.
  • Five safety measures that don’t make you safer. I’ve heard skepticism about sunscreen before, but is it really that useless?
  • Rock Band gradually becoming more like a real rock band. Next edition rumored to come with petty infighting and starter heroin.
  • Woman arrested, charged for refusing to hand found wallet over to the police. But it isn’t because she wanted to keep it. She had apparently had a bad prior experience involving police and stolen property and wanted to first make sure the owner was okay with them making the transfer.
  • Esquire‘s list of “Best Members of Congress” is pretty well done. We’re obviously grading on a generous curve here, but the names they picked are largely the better members of either party, and except for a couple, Esquire picked them for the right reasons. I can’t complain about the “worst” list either. But that’s a much easier list to make.
  • The full Larry Sanders Show finally released on DVD. Jeffrey Tambor is on my list of 10 funny people with whom I’d like to have a beer.
  • Not your ordinary “megachurch leaders comes out of the closet” story. In fact, this one is in encouraging. (UPDATE: Link fixed.)
  • Heard a segment on NPR the other day in which there was much lamenting over how unenthusiastic Latino voters seem to be, and how this could make things worse for the Democrats tomorrow. I’m thinking that the Obama administration boasting about its record number of deportations might have something to do with the dampened energy.
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61 Responses to “Morning Links”

  1. #1 |  Mister DNA | 

    The “megachurch leader comes out of the closet” link goes to Reason’s password-protected admin page.

  2. #2 |  treefroggy | 

    You can’t be serious !! Barney Frank and Russ Feingold among the “best” !!
    And Murtha and Stevens are dead. Doesn’t that put them amongst the “best” ? Or at least amongst the ones doing the least harm ?

  3. #3 |  Andrew S. | 

    @Treefroggy: I’d put Russ Feingold amongst the best. Do I agree with his policies? Usually, no. But at least he has the balls to go against his own party when he feels they’re betraying their principles. Plus his status as the only senator with the balls to vote against the PATRIOT Act (and his damn good speech about it at the time).

  4. #4 |  Elliot | 

    Barney Frank is one of the major causes for the Freddie and Fannie debacle. He’s pouring salt in that wound, even now.

    No list that includes him can be taken seriously.

  5. #5 |  Cyto | 

    Nina Shen Rastogi is a not entirely unfortunate looking young woman who writes articles about video games and confesses that she’s always wanted to front a rock band called “Discipline and Punish”.

    Ok, I’m being punked here, right?

  6. #6 |  Dave Krueger | 

    Woman arrested, charged for refusing to hand found wallet over to the police…

    She is obviously a menace to society, using the lame excuse that she should have some discretion in how to return a wallet she found. Police have a solemn duty to bring to bear all the resources at their command to rein in such an ominous threat and once again make the community safe for law abiding citizens.

    It’s no wonder cops are afraid to go after crooks and villains these days. You bleeding heart pussies are always coddling the miscreants, but when cops happen to make a completely understandable error like shooting some unarmed guy 47 times, you come down on them like a ton of bricks. It’s time you all get some perspective and stop defending expendable nobodies against our honorable boys in blue.

  7. #7 |  Ahcuah | 

    On the new TSA screening devices, I would be so tempted to tape an aluminum foil “FUCK YOU” to my chest. It would show up on the scanner AND be free speech. Furthermore, there is no way it could be considered a security threat. However, we all know full well I’d still spend a lot of “quality time” talking to the TSA folks, and maybe others.

  8. #8 |  KristenS | 

    I’d really love to read that story about the megachurch. Oh well.

  9. #9 |  Cyto | 

    @Dave – I like the cop’s comments about “I spent 2 hours doing what could have taken 10 minutes”, presumably in support of the notion that she needs to be arrested for obstruction – with no obvious sense of the irony that they are now spending many dozens of hours on a stupid prosecution when they could have resolved the matter with a simple phone call to the owner of the wallet. That would have taken about – oh, say 10 minutes….

  10. #10 |  Mike Leatherwood | 

    The reason Barney Frank is on the list :

    “…he abundantly makes up for with his unmatched ability to cut through right-wing blather like a hot knife through butter”

    Wow. Really? That’s it? That sounds more like a pundit that good Congressman. Worthless list is worthless.

  11. #11 |  Elliot | 

    Read the description for Chet Edwards on that list, too. He voted 96% with Democrats, but split ranks with them to vote against same-sex marriage.

    Maybe Chet Edwards and Barney Frank were the “except for a couple” exceptions you mentioned, Radley.

  12. #12 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    Keep an eye on Louie Gohmert. He might be the craziest SOB I’ve ever seen and he’s bound to produce some historically awesome failures. The man is a raving lunatic.

    Elliot and treefroggy summed up Barney Frank correctly. Esquire is now off my list of credible list-generators of “Best Politicians”. They still rank women with efficiency and class, though.

  13. #13 |  KristenS | 

    Was Barney Frank the one who wanted to do away with the law banning use of money in US accounts to play poker online? Cause that’s a biggie for me.

  14. #14 |  Radley Balko | 

    Barney Frank is horrendous on economic issues, but he’s one of the few Democrats in Congress who actually walks the walk on civil liberties. Again, we’re grading on a steep curve, here. But in a party where just about everyone is bad on economics *and* civil liberties, Frank stands out.

    If the Internet gambling ban gets overturned, it will be thanks to Frank.

    Agreed that Edwards shouldn’t be on the list.

  15. #15 |  Tom Barkwell | 

    The only good politician is an ex-politician. Collectively, there are very few more despicable groups of people on this planet. Really.

  16. #16 |  Dave Krueger | 

    #7 Ahcuah

    On the new TSA screening devices, I would be so tempted to tape an aluminum foil “FUCK YOU” to my chest.

    Oh, my. That’s good. But, you’re right that they would almost certainly give you a hard time about it at least until after your flight left without you. After all, it’s not like there are any ethical standards that would prevent them from doing that. Ethics and integrity are for little people.

  17. #17 |  Andrew S. | 

    On the new TSA screening devices, I would be so tempted to tape an aluminum foil “FUCK YOU” to my chest. It would show up on the scanner AND be free speech. Furthermore, there is no way it could be considered a security threat. However, we all know full well I’d still spend a lot of “quality time” talking to the TSA folks, and maybe others.

    Yes, it’s free speech. But given that the TSA has never been one to believe in the first amendment (or the 4th, or the 5th, or the whole “right to travel” thing) yes, you would be spending a bit of “quality time” talking to the SS TSA Agents and the police. As is what happened in the “Kip Hawley is an Idiot” incident.

  18. #18 |  Nancy Lebovitz | 

    More health effects– Vitamin D might actually be a vitamin where supplementation helps, and I expect that part of people being low on it is being told to be afraid of sun exposure.

    One of my friends was a TSA guard– “was” because he’s disabled due to intestinal cancer. He and his wife suspect that it was because of exposure to x-rays– guards aren’t allowed to wear protective gear, even if they buy it themselves.

  19. #19 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    In his motion, Robinson argued, in part, that Heinrich’s possessory right to the lost wallet outweighed the police department’s right to obtain it. Therefore, he argued, police weren’t acting lawfully.

    According to Wyoming law, a person is guilty of interference if he or she obstructs a peace officer “engaged in the lawful performance of his official duties.” A person charged with interference, a misdemeanor, faces a maximum possible penalty of one year behind bars if convicted.

    Example of “The System Works!”. When a cop acts unlawfully, you simply must surrender yourself to the arrest and/or beating. Sit behind bars. Spend a ton of money getting out of jail. Spend a ton of money on a defense attorney. And then, about a 1.5 years later a judge might throw the case out or you can spend a year in jail. Cops face no reprisal for acting unlawfully…that would be barbaric. So, it really is a win/win.

    Money Quote: “We’re only going to take so much…” said the agitated po po. I’m pretty sure he was talking about cash from the wallet, but it sums up LEO’s disgust with the peasant class. Po po no care about the laws. His law is what he feels like doing today.

  20. #20 |  Andrew S. | 

    As for the scanners themselves, I’ve opted out of them before and I will again. The TSA has an unofficial policy to badger you, make you look like an idiot, and imply to the other people in line to be screened that you have something to hide and are a potential danger. Always opt out. And make the pat-down as uncomfortable as possible for the TSA agent who has the duty to perform that task.

  21. #21 |  Joshua | 

    Re: #10 and #14 – One thing I’ll definitely give Barney Frank credit for is admitting he was wrong on supporting massive federal pumping of low-income home ownership in the wake of the Fannie/Freddie collapse. A Congress Critter willing to reverse course so dramatically may clear the way for others to publicly reconsider positions.

  22. #22 |  fwb | 

    Sunscreen: And yes many/most sunscreens contain oxybenzone, a compound that mimics estrogen. It has been found to cause boy fishies to grow ovarian tissue in their testes. Good for getting in touch with your feminine side.

  23. #23 |  MikeZ | 

    Regarding the wallet case, I’m really curious as to the judge’s reasoning behind a mistrial. Really annoying that any web article seems to skip that. I thought mistrials were only used because of misconduct by a witness/lawyer.

    The only thing I saw was the prosecution didn’t present any evidence that the police had a right to the wallet. So why a mistrial? Shouldn’t that be a straight acquittal?

  24. #24 |  Mike Leatherwood | 

    Barney Frank is about a 50% Congressman. Some things very right, some things very wrong. So, if 50% is top 10, we’re doomed.

  25. #25 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    Thank you, Radley for the Esquire list as there were a couple names with which I was unfamiliar.

    From Ryan’s summary:

    And while it’s true that most people get over the truly awful Ayn Rand by sophomore year (and the fact that Ryan hasn’t is just embarrassing)…

    I thought hipsters like Esquire writers were supposed to steer clear of tired ideas and criticisms? I swear that if I have to read or hear one more time about how Rand’s ideas should be outgrown in college like binge-drinking and experimenting-one-time-with-another-girl, I will hurl. Yes, we should all abandon thoughts of individualty and line up at the state glory hole by the time we’re 30.

  26. #26 |  Cynical in CA | 

    •Woman arrested, charged for refusing to hand found wallet over to the police.

    No good deed goes unpunished.

  27. #27 |  Cynical in CA | 

    •Esquire’s list of “Best Members of Congress” is pretty well done.

    Oy fucking vey.

  28. #28 |  Ahcuah | 

    From Reason’s morning links, it looks like TSA is going to try to make opting out of the screening devices as uncomfortable as possible. See the entry about their “Crotchal” strategy.

    Next internet hit product: a penis-extender that will make it look like you are really well-hung for the screening devices. Bonus consequence: you’ll be able to smuggle extra “liquids” in it, meaning that once the TSA figures that out, they’ll start wanting to manually check out all well-endowed men. Kinky.

  29. #29 |  Cyto | 

    @ Nancy # 18

    Amount of Vitamin D in a On A Day vitamin: 1,000 IU
    Amount of Vitamin D in a maximum strength super supplement: 32,000 IU
    Government says you need 200 IU
    Maximum Safe Dosage per Day (govt) 2,000 IU

    Amount of sun exposure needed for your body to make your RDA of vitamin D at my location while wearing office clothing walking to lunch every other day – 3 minutes. *

    (* Completely unfair comparison, I live in subtropical climes. YMMV)

  30. #30 |  Mario | 

    Regarding the woman and the wallet, the police are going to have to expect more and more of this kind of thing if they continue to abuse the public’s trust.

  31. #31 |  Brandon | 

    A pastor in Georgia comes out against the ridiculousness of religous homophobia (mishomoism?) at the same time the Obama administration tries to score cheap political points by bragging about how many lives it has ruined. This is why I don’t understand the acrimony towards religion so often exhibited here. The majority of religious folks are just dupes who want to do the right thing but can’t figure out what that is. Religion is redeemable. Government is not.

  32. #32 |  Elliot | 

    @Cyto, #29 : For the sake of your health, I would immediately stop believing anything the government says you need to do for your health. Also, the MSM and a majority of doctors. Much of the “official” guidelines or the “common wisdom” are just flat wrong. I keep reading about Vitamin D being underrated. It doesn’t make sense that humans evolved for millions of years spending almost every waking hour in the sun, but somehow more than a few minutes every other day is more than we need.

    I would recommend you seek out more in-depth information and careful analysis. I personally consider the Paleo/Primal/Evolutionary fitness approach to be the most rational, based upon the idea that we need to consider the environment in which our ancestors evolved when trying to figure out what sort of nutrition and exercise most suits the human genetics. The most informative site I’ve seen is Mark Sisson’s (“Mark’s Daily Apple”), but I’m sure there are many others of which I’m unaware. You can find all sorts of great information if you’re determined and skeptical.

  33. #33 |  Bob | 

    Woman arrested, charged for refusing to hand found wallet over to the police.

    The finding of Mistrial is disturbing, especially considering that the judge basically found for the defendant.

    The Prosecution can now start a NEW trial, because… you know, they have no actual criminals to try… and she dissed the po pos with her blatant “I don’t need you fools” attitude. It’ll be a million dollar trial, easy.

  34. #34 |  Charlie O | 

    The wallet case had nothing to do with enforcing the law. It was all about enforcing the notion that we’re (the blue gang) are in charge and you’re (Debbie) not! The cops should all be charged with wasting a court’s time and the taxpayer’s dollars. Fuck’n assholes!

  35. #35 |  Charlie O | 

    My strategy for the TSA patdowns is to request a little nutsack juggle while they’re down there.

  36. #36 |  Bob | 

    Brandon:

    I can’t speak for anyone else, but I can give you my own view, as someone who has acrimony towards religion.

    This is why I don’t understand the acrimony towards religion so often exhibited here. The majority of religious folks are just dupes who want to do the right thing but can’t figure out what that is.

    A group of random people that “want to do the right thing but can’t figure out what that is.” will essentially cancel themselves out by all going in different directions. Other groups, who can figure it out, will rationally debate the issue (Whatever it is) to form the majority positions.

    Enter religion. Religion takes “dupes who want to do the right thing but can’t figure out what that is.” and forms them into a monolithic block that is immune to rational debate.

  37. #37 |  random guy | 

    Brandon –

    My take on religion (which may or may not be shared by others) is that it is in most cases simply another system of control over the individual.

    We could point out the occasional principled politician and claim “Government is redeemable” too. But that would be a lie because the overarching pattern of behavior for politicians is a sociopathic need to control and manipulate others. The same is true of religion. I mean one pastor says “gays aren’t so bad”, thats great, I wish there were more like him.

    But lets be realistic here. That man serves as a contradiction to the dozens of religious officials that have made entire careers off of gay bashing, and the thousands of lesser officials that perpetuate the hate, and the millions of followers that eat it up. On a person by person basis I will withhold judgment on any christian, muslim, democrat, or republican I encounter. The groups as whole however, have patterns of behavior that I am unwilling to ignore in the name of one good person.

  38. #38 |  KristenS | 

    Religion is redeemable. Government is not.

    Honestly, I don’t see much difference other than government has a more direct effect over our lives in the U.S. But both organized religion and governments are hierarchical organizations that seek to control behavior. Both have agendas to push. Both seek to bring people into some sort of collective thinking. Religions have worked hand-in-hand with governments in the past, it just so happens they (ostensibly) work separately in the U.S.

  39. #39 |  EH | 

    I have to wonder what the TSA will do if you opt out of the porn-ray and, during the pat-down, “get into it” a little bit. “Ooh yeah, that’s the way I like it.” Can you be detained for leaning into their hand? “Good morning officer. Good thing air travelers aren’t subject to DADT eh? [wink wink]”

    Arguing against the TSA on the policy side has proven to be a non-starter. It’s time to start fucking with the agents themselves and start upping the ranks of PTSD sufferers among them.

  40. #40 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    EH,
    You can be detained and arrested for ANYTHING they want to detain or arrest you for. But, you knew that already.

    Most likely you’ll be arrested/charged for some sexual misconduct crime, convicted, and put on a sex offender list. Or, you’ll spend a couple years fighting it while also on a strict no-fly list (good luck keeping your job through all this).

  41. #41 |  MassHole | 

    “Enter religion. Religion takes “dupes who want to do the right thing but can’t figure out what that is.” and forms them into a monolithic block that is immune to rational debate.”

    I’m going to quote Bob’s words again. This is it in a nutshell!

    Once you believe in fairy tales, you’ll believe anything an authority figure tells you. If you really believe the world is 6,000 years old, it’s not a leap to believe that Obama is a secret muslim or that Pat Robertson can leg press 2,000 lbs.

  42. #42 |  Mattocracy | 

    The gay preacher-

    I drive past that megachurch whenever I drive out to see my folks. It is the most mega of megachurches. The amount of money that must flow through that place has to be astronomical. I wonder what you say to yourself when weighing the money vs. hiding your sexuality? And what suddenly changes that makes you do the opposite after so long? There’s something more to this story…

  43. #43 |  Marty | 

    I never thought I’d still like Cracked 30 years after we gave up buying Cracked, Mad, etc. They’re pumping out some great articles!

  44. #44 |  Ben | 

    I would have kicked out Chet Edwards in favor of Pete Stark. Other than that, I don’t have a big problem with most of the list.

  45. #45 |  Ben | 

    BTW- got a chance to play Rock Band 3 this weekend, and it was a lot of fun. The addition of 3-part harmonies on the vocals up the challange quite a bit, and adding in the keyboard parts is really cool too. I know a lot of people like to make fun of this game, but I am a gigging musician in a couple bands and still have a blast playing it.

  46. #46 |  Dave W. | 

    What the popos are saying:

    http://www.lineofduty.com/the-blotter/109465-fair-yes-or-no-wy-cops-arrest-woman-over-found-wallet

  47. #47 |  Michael Chaney | 

    I can’t believe the idiocy in the “found wallet” story. Last year we found a really nice digital camera in a rental car, and I spent a couple of hours tracking down the owner based on the pictures in it. Had the people at a tiny hotel they stayed had IQs over 50 I would have easily found them and returned it to them.

    I ended up calling the car company, but made it painfully clear to the lady in charge that they wouldn’t get the camera until they gave me the name & number of the owners and I had contacted the owners to let them know I had their camera and would be returning it through the car company. It worked out well, the lady from the car company came to my house to pick it up and she got it back to them. She got it only after the owner described some of the pictures to me over the phone.

    I trust nobody in situations like that.

  48. #48 |  Douglas | 

    While the sunscreen issue is a clear problem–sun + chemicals tends to be a bad combination–the part on bike helmet safety was damn ridiculous and irresponsible. There seemed to be ZERO information on head injuries that were less bad due to the wearing of a helmet. What the studies showed was that people stopped riding (for a damn stupid reason, really???) and then people starting caring less about hitting bikers…WTF? Well, let’s all not wear a helmet then and let the ladies with long or specially coiffed hair get back on the bike. Crikey.

  49. #49 |  MassHole | 

    A comment from the po-po at the link Dave W. provided:

    “In a word YES I’d have busted her ass. It is clear from reading this article the woman is not all there. The wallet did not belong to her, the owner of the wallet called the police in an effort to get it back, SHE was interfering with that effort. Is there any rational reason she had for refusing to turn the wallet over? Nah, she just probably doesn’t trust or like cops. No prob lady, just let me reinforce that attitude by dragging your ass to jail.”

  50. #50 |  hnc | 

    That fourth bullet kind of reminds me of the time I reported a stolen bike to the police. A guy on the street offered me a fairly nice bike for 10 bucks. Knowing what I would want done with my bike in that situation, I bought it and posted about it on Craigslist and a couple forums and reported it to the police.

    A couple cops came to my house, told me they couldn’t take the bike and then threatened me with the fact that buying a stolen bike is a crime (remember, I reported it to them!). They left after taking down a couple notes on a piece of paper that was probably thrown away. The owner found me on Craigslist a few days later.

  51. #51 |  Joe | 

    Five safety measures that don’t make you safer. I’ve heard skepticism about sunscreen before, but is it really that useless?

    I don’t necessarily disagree with the article, but it is funny we now rely on Cracked Magazine as an authoritative source on issues like this. Then again, I loved both Mad and Cracked as a kid, so I am game.

  52. #52 |  Joe | 

    #21 | Joshua | November 1st, 2010 at 11:19 am
    Re: #10 and #14 – One thing I’ll definitely give Barney Frank credit for is admitting he was wrong on supporting massive federal pumping of low-income home ownership in the wake of the Fannie/Freddie collapse. A Congress Critter willing to reverse course so dramatically may clear the way for others to publicly reconsider positions.

    +3

    Barney Frank has blamed Republicans for the mess. I can’t recall him ever taking personal responsibility for it. But if you have a link, how about sharing that with us? Thanks.

  53. #53 |  V-Man | 

    The new TSA policies are already having an effect. A close family member missed her flight this morning because the security checkpoint couldn’t process people through fast enough. Apparently she was far from alone, and it had a cascade effect throughout the day’s flights. She’s flying out tonight, only twelve hours later than planned.

    Thanks, TSA!

  54. #54 |  boomshanka | 

    The cracked article definitely conflates bike helmets with bike helmet laws. While bike helmet laws may lead to a decrease in overall cycling and therefore a more dangerous cycling environment, bike helmets clearly help protect one’s brains from spilling out onto the pavement in the event of an accident.

    Also, that study that showed drivers riding closer to cyclists with a helmet than those without was pretty limited in scope, and didn’t account for a huge variety of factors that may lead to a bicycle accident.

  55. #55 |  Dr. T | 

    Safety Measures: Lots of errors in this sensationalized story.

    To claim that antilock are ineffective is idiotic. It’s hard to count accidents that were avoided. On wet surfaces, antilock brakes reduce stopping distances significantly (except for expert drivers who can do slightly better with manual braking). Antilock brakes helped me to avoid three accidents over a five year period.

    Bike helmets are highly effective at preventing brain injuries, and I recommend them for all riders. Of course, helmets cannot prevent death from body trauma caused by a redneck asshole who deliberately sideswipes a bicyclist with his pickup truck.

    Sunscreens, when applied properly, effectively protect against sunburn (and that is their primary purpose). Avoiding sunburns helps prevent skin cancers. Melanoma is just one type of skin cancer, and it can arise on areas of the body with minimal sun exposure. The fact that melanoma incidence changes little with sunscreen use is irrelevant.

  56. #56 |  croaker | 

    The wallet article reminds me of the NYPD slugs that needed to boost their arrest stats, so they left wallets lying around and arrested anyone who picked them up.

    One of these days police funeral processions will need to be protected from flying rotten food products thrown by citizens who are tired of getting bent over by gun-wielding yahoos. Those “officers” on that po-po board are a perfect example.

  57. #57 |  croaker | 

    Cop told to disarm at voting booth, poll worker fired.

    http://www.bangordailynews.com/story/Greater-Bangor/Bangor-election-warden-dismissed-over-cop-gun-flap,157664

  58. #58 |  anarch | 

    At that point, she was arrested for interference and told police where the wallet could be found.

    “We’re only going to take so much,” Moody testified

    Y’mean you’ll leave the credit cards and take only the cash?

  59. #59 |  expat | 

    A former professor of mine used to say never trust the statistics unless you have manipulated them yourself.

    Having field tested a couple of bike helmets now, I would agree that they didn’t make being out on the road or the trail any safer. However, both helmets probably kept the test results at concussion rather than something more serious. Helmets aren’t intended to make cycling safer. They are intended to reduce the likelihood of a brain injury when one of these inevitable unsafe events occurs.

    The science behind the sunscreen study is questionable and there are lots of response articles out there that hit the major points. EWG has a history of scaremongering. Leaded lipstick, anyone? If you look at the scoring approach used in the study’s methodology (http://www.ewg.org/2010sunscreen/full-report/study-methodology/), you will see that at its core, their approach is inconsistent. 50-66% of the score is based on actual effectiveness testing of the product and 34-50% is based on perceived health hazards associated with its ingredients. If the assessor had a bias for or against one or more chemical ingredients, s/he would alter the overall score accordingly. That’s not good science. The health hazard portion of the assessment is really tricky to do well anyway, let alone when its weight can be varied arbitrarily. Probably a good way to be consistent would be to create a metric that relies on one or more of the widely-used chemical classification systems (e.g. IARC or USEPA for carcinogenicity). For most of the compounds in question, there isn’t enough data for classification in these systems. The science that was actually used for their health hazard assessment is probably quite limited, variable and inconsistent. Somewhere between 34 and 50% of each overall score is based on a very subjective set of information… and that doesn’t even get into the methodology behind the other [50 - 66%] of the assessment. It’s a shame, really. If the effectiveness testing methodology is good scientifically, there are so many useful things that can be learned from the dataset.

  60. #60 |  delta | 

    #31: “This is why I don’t understand the acrimony towards religion so often exhibited here. The majority of religious folks are just dupes who want to do the right thing but can’t figure out what that is. Religion is redeemable. Government is not.”

    I have no idea how you think religion might be redeemed, other than having the “dupes” exit said religion. Which makes it, ipso facto, irredeemable.

  61. #61 |  Elliot | 

    @anarch, #58 — zing!

    Nicely done

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