Another Isolated Incident

Friday, October 8th, 2010

Cook County, Illinois:

An elderly couple says Cook County sheriff’s police on a drug raid smashed into their Southwest Side house late Thursday night, terrorizing them before admitting they had the wrong house.

With her husband already asleep, 84-year-old Anna Jakymek was just turning out the lights when she heard loud noises at the back and front doors about 11:30 p.m.

Her initial thought was that her 89-year old husband had fallen out of bed, but she realized something else was happening when she looked into the front room.

“I see maybe 20 guys come in and see the door knocked open,” she said…

Son Andrew said the most potent drug in the home is aspirin.

“They don’t smoke, drink or even watch TV. They believe in America,” he said.

He added that his father, Andrij, suffers from Alzheimer’s Disease and has terminal cancer.

“He won’t even take pain medicine,” he said…

His mother, he said, called him after the raid at the request of the supervising sergeant on the scene. When he got there, he said he was told the officers had raided the wrong home.

“When I arrived the officer explained they had misinformation, but said his job was over, and he was leaving. They left a copy of the warrant, but he absolved himself of any responsibility for the raid or the damage,” Andrew Jakymec said.

He estimated the damage to broken doors, locks and windows at up to $3,000.

“Everything was violently opened. Cabinets were ripped open, clothes and sheets were everywhere, and pieces of wood where the doors were rammed were all over the place,” he said.

Bonus points: The Jakymeks emigrated to the U.S. from the Ukraine in the 1960s in order to escape Soviet oppression.

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75 Responses to “Another Isolated Incident”

  1. #1 |  Nando | 

    Nothing to see here, just business as usual. Please, continue with your life like nothing happened.

  2. #2 |  Mister DNA | 

    The solution is glaringly simple: if you don’t want the cops raiding your house, don’t have an address that can be confused with a drug dealer’s. These foreigners should have thought about that a long time ago.

  3. #3 |  Highway | 

    Did it really take them until after they ripped open cabinets, drawers, and busted the doors up to realize ‘Hey this isn’t the right house.’ They couldn’t have figured that out when the only two people they can find in the house are octogenarians and the house probably looks like an old people’s house.

    Basically, they got the judge to sign off on a warrant to vandalize someone’s house and terrorize them. They get to dress up in clown suits, storm in, point their guns all over the place, bust up people’s things, and then just walk away, cause they followed the procedures.

    Folks are lucky they didn’t have a Pekingese or some other little yappy dog.

  4. #4 |  JS | 

    At least they got away from the evil godless communist Soviet system where they probably don’t even have to worry about SWAT teams breaking in your house in the middle of the night. Thank God we live in the freest country in the world!

  5. #5 |  JS | 

    I wonder of Toby Keith will write a song about this and sing it on the Mike Huckabee show? That’d be sweeeeet!

  6. #6 |  Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart | 

    Mayor Daley convicted the Dowalibys (http://www.amazon.com/Gone-Night-David-Protess/dp/product-description/044021243X) as Cook County State’s Atty just as he ran for Mayor in 1988-89. Maybe this is the way to go as I run for mayor!

  7. #7 |  ktc2 | 

    But at least now they’re free from the Soviet police state!

  8. #8 |  SJE | 

    As Penn Jillette says: “FUUUUCK”!

  9. #9 |  andyinsdca | 

    Until we hold police officers individually responsible (civilly and criminally) for acts like this, they’ll just keep doing it. Since they aren’t responsible, why should they care if they fuck up?

  10. #10 |  Bob | 

    Actually, there is no indication that it was the wrong house at all.

    The address on the Warrant, 5623 South Kilbourn Avenue, is in the block the Jakymeks live on. More likely, the Police simply failed to do any credible investigation whatsoever.

    As evidence of this, I submit:
    “They show me a sheet with a woman and man who complained we have that. We don’t,”

    and:

    “When I arrived the officer explained they had misinformation”

    Indicating that it was indeed THEIR house that was the intended target, and that the warrant was the result of informants giving up bogus information, I assume for consideration of a plea bargain or something.

    I’m sick of this shit.

    People that break into houses like this should be gunned down by Homeowners.

    If the cops don’t like that solution, then they should hold their so called investigators accountable for their incompetence.

  11. #11 |  Joe | 

    This is why we have plaintiff attorneys. Release the Cracken!

  12. #12 |  Joe | 

    And juries.

  13. #13 |  JS | 

    andyinsdca “Until we hold police officers individually responsible (civilly and criminally) for acts like this, they’ll just keep doing it. Since they aren’t responsible, why should they care if they fuck up?”

    Yea and even if they aren’t accountable legally there could be pressure to stop this crap if the public were outraged by seeing this on the evening news. Of course since there is a news blackout on police abuse I guarantee you won’t see this story on the evening news.

  14. #14 |  Marty | 

    “They don’t smoke, drink or even watch TV. They believe in America,” he said.

    I guess the rest of us should go turn ourselves in- judging by how I feel and the posts on this site, we are doomed.

  15. #15 |  qwints | 

    How the hell is this not an unreasonable search?

  16. #16 |  Bob | 

    Confirmation:

    The address on the Warrant, 5623 South Kilbourn Avenue, is in fact owned by an A. Jakymek.

    It wasn’t the wrong house at all. That was the house they intended to hit.

    I would love to hear the explanation on this so called ‘investigation’.

  17. #17 |  SJE | 

    Hey Pres. Obama, when you were an Ill. State Rep you sponsored a good bill to improve police accountability. Right now the Dems are looking to lose your Senate seat. How about using this case as a basis for improved police oversight? Sounds like the sort of program that would attract the pissed off masses currently voting for the Tea Party.

  18. #18 |  Tom Barkwell | 

    As long as you’re not doing anything illegal, you have nothing to fear from government stormtroopers who burst into your home in the middle of the night, guns drawn. Unless you own a dog. Or have children. Or a gun. Or move after they yell “freeze.”

    $3000 is a cheap price to pay to live in the beacon of freedom that is America.

  19. #19 |  MDGuy | 

    @Bob

    The Jakymeks’ address was on the warrant, so the police hit the “right” house. They just got the wrong address on the warrant (sounds like a convenient way to go “fishing” doesn’t it?). From the article:

    “The warrant said police were looking for a 23-year-old man, described as Hispanic who lived in the ranch home. Records show a judge last month ruled the man forfeited bond in a drug-possession case. The address listed for the man in court records did not match that of the Jakymeks.” (emphasis mine).

  20. #20 |  Brandon | 

    So it took us 50 years to catch up to Soviet-era Ukraine in gestapoing? That is unacceptable! USA! USA! USA!

  21. #21 |  Nemo | 

    All to ‘save’ us from inanimate objects (drugs). We’re more in need of being ‘saved’ from our hell-bent ‘saviors’ than from any drugs. Jeez…

  22. #22 |  Bob | 

    MDGuy,

    So, you’re saying the investigator who got the warrant may be totally incompetent?

    It wasn’t a mistake. They hit the right house, the one they were investigating. The investigation was just totally incompetent.

    It wasn’t a mistake. Heads at the Police Department should roll.

  23. #23 |  KristenS | 

    BONASERA: I believe in America. America has made my fortune.

    I — I went to the police, like a good American. These two boys were brought to trial. The judge sentenced them to three years in prison — suspended sentence. Suspended sentence! They went free that very day! I stood in the courtroom like a fool. And those two bastard, they smiled at me. Then I said to my wife, “for justice, we must go to Don Corleone.”

  24. #24 |  Bob | 

    Here we go! The “Informant defense”

    http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/39572755/ns/local_news-chicago_il/

    Cook County sheriff’s police said they had recieved a tip from a respected informant that illegal activity was going on at the residence.

    “This informant has previously provided credible information that has assisted law enforcement agencies in solving other crimes,” a sheriff’s spokesman said in a release. “That informant identified this house as the location where illegal activity was occurring. After providing information to prosecutors and judges, our request for a search warrant was approved. As soon as we entered the home, we knew this couple was not involved in the activity alleged.”

    BULLSHIT! Show me the transparency, or stop hiding behind unnamed ‘informants’.

  25. #25 |  Dave Krueger | 

    You people clearly have trust issues.

  26. #26 |  Bob | 

    So…

    Is it just me, or is the script on these Home Invasions the exact same every time?

    Step one: “Respected Informant” points out house where drug activity is going on.

    Step Two: Investigators fill out an Affidavit saying that they ‘investigated’ these allegations, and get a Judge to sign off on a Search Warrant. Or, if the Judge is especially incompetent, just get them to rubber stamp the warrant.

    Step Three: SWAT rolls in, full military bluster, bashes down doors, terrorizes men, women and children, shoots any pets they see.

    Fourth Amendment? Forget about it! With these methods, any house could be targeted at any time.

  27. #27 |  Tom G | 

    Radley, I really do have to send you a few links discussing the feasability of privately run civilian defense and detective companies. Most such discussions explicitly bring up the need for accountability, possibility of lawsuits to discourage abuses, and the ability to change the company who you’re contracted with at will.
    Anarchists don’t claim that freed market police agencies are perfect – but given how often you post abuses under the current system, I would hope you would at least give such arguments the time they merit. After all, it is hard to argue that things would be worse under a competitive system than they already are now.
    What we have now is a systemic low level (relatively speaking) of police abuse, not enough to draw the attention of the media spotlight for long, and not normally directed against the upper class. So you have no one who would be in the position to fix the abuses, actually giving a goddamn about doing so.

  28. #28 |  Lori Wilson | 

    Does anyone else find the term “respected informant” to be an oxymoron?

    Oops! I used a word with “oxy” in it, I’m probably next on the home invasion – I mean lawful search list.

  29. #29 |  SJE | 

    @#25 Bob “Fourth Amendment? Forget about it! With these methods, any house could be targeted at any time.”

    Or, any elementary school, stuffed with kids. (see agitator this week)

  30. #30 |  Aaron | 

    I have an idea: anyone who gets arrested should have a list of policeman’s home addresses memorized. Then, turn “informant” and give them one or two of those addresses and say that those are where you bought your dope the last time.

    See how these cops like that shit.

  31. #31 |  DarkEFang | 

    #26 Tom G –

    “Anarchists don’t claim that freed market police agencies are perfect – but given how often you post abuses under the current system, I would hope you would at least give such arguments the time they merit. After all, it is hard to argue that things would be worse under a competitive system than they already are now.”

    We already tried that experiment for about 50 years in the late 1800s, with the Pinkerton Detective Agency being the most famous. It was a pretty mixed bag, just like police today.

    I think the key is first focusing reform efforts at the public policy level. Until we change the priorities of law enforcement, reform at a departmental level is going to fail.

  32. #32 |  Dave Krueger | 

    #28 Lori Wilson

    Does anyone else find the term “respected informant” to be an oxymoron?

    Yes. In fact, the name change to “confidential informant” (as they are usually known) was intended to confer respectability on them. It sounds better than calling them by their old name: stool pigeon.

  33. #33 |  Tom G | 

    Sorry, but I doubt that the Pinkertons and other agencies in the 1800s are the best way to disprove my point. The laws under which such companies were formed and operated were anything but libertarian in scope. The Pinkertons were originally formed for the benefit of wealthy corporations (mainly railroads) and helped them counter the attempts by workers to unionize – through legally questionable means, at times. State and local governments were not exactly neutral in these disputes, usually siding with the businesses (who probably helped finance legislative campaigns).

  34. #34 |  MDGuy | 

    I’m pretty sure Radley has documented cases where the “respected informant” whose tips/testimony has led to numerous arrests/convictions against joe schmoes starts talking about corrupt police, and suddenly the “respected informant” becomes a “known liar who will say anything for a plea bargain.”

  35. #35 |  MikeZ | 

    To me the whole right/wrong address seems somewhat moot when it comes to damages. The cops should be liable for all damages caused by ALL warrants they serve. Just because the guy is a suspected drug dealer doesn’t give the cops free pass to break his furniture. After all everyone is innocent until proven guilty.

    I see nothing wrong if after a conviction part of the sentence is a fine used to defray the costs of repairing this damage. However the initial liability should always be the polices.

    I bet they’d start double thinking raids if every time a raid doesn’t end in a conviction for something they were paying extra for it.

  36. #36 |  Michael Chaney | 

    These guys aren’t always stool pigeons. Some of them are simply making a living by living on the fringes of illegal activity and getting paid by the police for “tips” like these.

    What always strikes me about these is the whole “our warrant is valid so we can do what we want” posture that the police take after the damage is done. Unless I’m mistaken, a search warrant is not a general “we can do whatever we want to the property” license.

    I do understand that if someone’s holding a hostage, for instance, it might make sense to knock the doors down and do some damage. But that’s a different situation. Have courts ever ruled on the legality of this?

  37. #37 |  paranoiastrksdp | 

    Every story like this should include contact information, if available, for the people responsible. Just saying.

  38. #38 |  paranoiastrksdp | 

    we also need to consider the possibility that the reason these assholes rush into raids like this is because they’re more than likely counting on the fact that even if they have the wrong house, they can bust the occupants for *something* to justify the raid. Didn’t Rand say something about the law being so expansive that it would make everyone a criminal? You can’t fart in the united states without 12 pigs up your ass trying to guess what you had for dinner the night before..

  39. #39 |  bobzbob | 

    Of course the solution is for the PD to adopt the private sector model and institute a “middle management” layer that is responsible for day to day process management and quality control- no private company could run for very long with as little management as public agencies try to get by with.

  40. #40 |  SJE | 

    Bobzob: private corporations also have things like responsibility, termination, demotion, and the real threat of criminal or civil charges. No amount of middle management, six-sigma best practices or mckinsey consultants can do much if everyone else can do pretty much whatever the F they want, which is the situation with PDs.

    Right now we have in the DC region PG county, where the last few classes of officer cadets were found to have all graduated with 100% scores on their exams. All their exams. They are investigating, but so far there is no sign that this evidence of widespread cheating…which is FRAUD…will result in these people getting terminated or charged. Fraud is one of the rare convictions that will stick around forever, because it says that everything you say is suspect. How you can give the cops a pass on this shows just how F–d up it is.

  41. #41 |  SJE | 

    Just to clarify… the “you” in the last sentence is a generic, not directed to Bobzob

  42. #42 |  Medicine Man | 

    Won’t anyone think about the mental anguish the SWAT team suffered in this debacle?

    (The Dick Cheney defense)

  43. #43 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    @31,

    I think the key is first focusing reform efforts at the public policy level.

    Good luck with that.

  44. #44 |  DarkEFang | 

    Good news everybody!

    The NYPD is getting new, more powerful tasers:

    http://gothamist.com/2010/10/06/nypd_rolling_out_new_tasers_with_co.php

  45. #45 |  PersonFromPorlock | 

    #35 | MikeZ | October 8th, 2010 at 1:48 pm

    I bet they’d start double thinking raids if every time a raid doesn’t end in a conviction for something they were paying extra for it.

    That would be plan B: plan A would be to bring along a little something to ensure a conviction.

  46. #46 |  KristenS | 

    As soon as we entered the home, we knew this couple was not involved in the activity alleged.”

    Bald-faced lie. If it was “as soon as we entered the home”, then how does he explain the time it took to overturn their furniture and open all their cabinetry?

  47. #47 |  Bergman | 

    I’ve been giving a great deal of thought to the idea of reinforcing my home against home invasion robberies of late. Windows too narrow to climb through made of armor glass, pocket doors instead of conventional hinges which extend far enough into the wall to be ram-proof, vault door style locking bolts instead of cheap dead bolts, sensors that detect breaches and turn on A/V recording gear, obvious and concealed recording media, etc.

    As far as I know, it doesn’t violate the building code either…

  48. #48 |  bobzbob | 

    ” private corporations also have things like responsibility, termination, demotion, and the real threat of criminal or civil charges.”

    Actually they often don’t, the worst the leaders of major corporations are likely to face is a forced retirement to the golden parachute.

    Exxon Valdez- 20 years later Exxon has payed out $383M in damages (for ruining 33,000 lives) – a tiny fraction of the profits for one quarter. That isn’t a real threat in any way shape or form. And criminal penalties? Hah! What world do you live in?

  49. #49 |  Elemenope | 

    Didn’t Rand say something about the law being so expansive that it would make everyone a criminal?

    ‘Give me six lines written by the most honorable of men, and I will find an excuse in them to hang him.’ – Cardinal Richelieu

  50. #50 |  pam | 

    maybe the cops don’t like Ukranians, you got a problem wit dat?

  51. #51 |  Robert | 

    Bergman: There’s one local that has laws against just exactly what you describe. I can’t remember the place right off my head, but basically they passed a law that says if you have anything other than a normal door on your house, and they find anything at all illeagal inside, that they can tack on an extra charge.

  52. #52 |  Marlon Perkins | 

    “They don’t smoke, drink or even watch TV. They believe in America,” he said.

    Nothing, I just thought that line was hilarious enough to see one more time.

  53. #53 |  Dave W. | 

    There has been an update in the Brian Kelly video’ing police case which Mr. Balko has reported on in the past IIRC:

    http://www.leagle.com/unsecure/page.htm?shortname=infco20101004083

    good, but could have and should have been better

  54. #54 |  Dave W. | 

    Further to previous: Long story short (the case is long):

    1. it is not a crime to videotape on-duty popos in PA

    but

    2. court says it is not clear whether there is an affirmative Constitutional right to video popos, and the court declined to provide any clarification on that point

  55. #55 |  Dave W. | 

    legal update in the Guizn killig case against the police too:

    http://www.ctpost.com/news/article/Judge-refuses-to-dismiss-lawsuit-in-fatal-raid-by-683791.php

  56. #56 |  Juxtaposition « Oh, My! | 

    […] And this. […]

  57. #57 |  ZappaCrappa | 

    You people all need to shut the fuck up and be grateful you live in the greatest country on the mother fucking planet…and recite the pledge of allegiance! I said RECITE THE FUCKING PLEDGE OF FUCKING ALLEGIANCE!!!! ooops…wrong thread…or is it?

  58. #58 |  Kevin3% | 

    I suspect that what will eventually come of all of these “ISOLATED INCIDENTS” if no level of substantive accountability is forthcoming, the first cop who breaches the door in such a manner, will one day, have his fucking head blown off!

    Substantive accountability = personal and individual criminal charges and personal and individual payment of restitution against the wrong doer(s).

    I am not holding my breadth for the former. Nor will I shed a single tear for the pig who dies in such a manner.

  59. #59 |  Steamed McQueen | 

    re: Soviet oppression: Even the KGB had the courtesy to knock first and determine that they had the correct apartment before they ripped the place apart and took the inhabitant away.

  60. #60 |  donttread | 

    I hope the Jakymeks are able to collect a substantial settlement for this state inflicted terror. Unfortunately, as others have pointed out, even if there is some sort of payment it will not come out of the pockets of the idiots who ransacked their house, but rather once again from the taxpayers’ pockets.

  61. #61 |  DarkEFang | 

    FBI super-spies attempt to track a Egyptian-American college student, only to be foiled by an oil-change technician:

    http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2010/10/fbi-tracking-device/

  62. #62 |  National Police Misconduct NewsFeed Daily Recap 10-08-10 « Injustice Everywhere | 

    […] the home since they left the Soviet Union in the 1960′s to escape government oppression. (h/t The Agitator) […]

  63. #63 |  albatross | 

    Bergman:

    You might want to weigh the relative risk of home invasion (government or freelance) vs fire, and think through whether you’d rather have the SWAT team not be able to quickly get into your house, at the cost of also having the fire department not be able to quickly get in.

    In fact, one of the strongest reasons to have professional police forces and laws and such is so we *don’t* all need to live in fortresses, carry guns, wear body armor, travel in groups, etc. Places where you *have* to do those things are awful places to live. (There’s nothing wrong with doing those things, if you want to, but anyplace where it’s necessary for basic safety is a lousy place to live.)

  64. #64 |  pam | 

    AND:

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/southsouthwest/ct-met-will-county-shooting-spree-10020101008,0,1174670.story

    (all 3 stories on the first 4 pages of the Chicago Tribune today)

  65. #65 |  Bob | 

    Dorian was off-duty at the time. Prosecutors said he was driving at least 83 mph when he hit a pickup truck on Illinois Highway 394 near Richton Road, killing 17-year-old Dylan Drapeau, a senior at Crete- Monee High School. Drapeau’s family pushed for Dorian to be charged with reckless homicide.

    At the time, Lynwood Police Chief David Palmer said Dorian admitted speeding but said he was rushing to take his car for repairs after his “check engine” light started flashing.

    Ah yes, the old “Check engine light” defense.

  66. #66 |  Jared | 

    I don’t smoke, I do drink, and I also believe in America. Its existence, that is.

  67. #67 |  pam | 

    (sorry, I don’t think this posted the first time).

    Sheriff’s Police Applogize for Raid
    http://www.chicagotribune.com/
    (ha check out the TV)

    and

    http://www.chicagobreakingnews.com/2010/10/man-convicted-of-murder-in-2004-goes-free-charges-dropped.html

  68. #68 |  delta | 

    #11 said: “Release the Cracken!”

    Um… it’s “Kraken”. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kraken

  69. #69 |  Whim | 

    I think the police (the public) are liable for property damage inflicted during a SWAT or any other kind of raid on a residence.

    Anyone know otherwise?

    If the police batter down your door, tear up your furniture, and create domestic mayhem they owe for property damages.

    The Ukrainian couple should file a claim with the city.

  70. #70 |  Marty | 

    some departments will budget to handle damages, but you usually have to fight for damages (and good luck collecting). They’re ‘doing their job’, it’s not their fault that you’re a criminal or that they got faulty intel.

    it’s a small price we pay for freedom.

  71. #71 |  Windy | 

    “As soon as we entered the home, we knew this couple was not involved in the activity alleged.”
    So if they knew immediately the couple were not involved in anything illegal, why the hell did they toss the house? The damage could have been limited to the doors being bashed in, but instead they turned the house upside down:
    “Everything was violently opened. Cabinets were ripped open, clothes and sheets were everywhere, and pieces of wood where the doors were rammed were all over the place.”
    Sounds like harassment to me.

  72. #72 |  Windy | 

    That’ll teach me to read all the comments before posting my own, Kristen said much the same thing as I.

  73. #73 |  pam | 

    24 cops in riot gear broke into an elderly couple’s home while a guy in TN watched while his house burn to the ground. Something is wrong with this picture.

  74. #74 |  GreginOz | 

    Given the sheer size of th U.S. I am waiting for a “Terminator” incident in revenge for some egregious action by Gummint thugs. As in like Big Arnie blowing through a PigPen all weaponed up. There will be dancing in the streets. The war the U.S. Gummint is waging on it’s own citizens will actually CREATE domestic terrorists…’course they’ll be calling THEMSELVES Patriots! It would be suitably ironic if such an incident was enacted by an ex-service person, now that’s what i call fucking blowback
    ;-).

  75. #75 |  Embed the Raidmap « The Republican Heretic | 

    […] of police excesses include the unnecessary death of seven-year old Aiyana Jones in Detroit and this raid on an innocent elderly couple in Chicago (immigrants who fled the Soviet Union because of […]

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