Morning Links

Wednesday, October 6th, 2010
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56 Responses to “Morning Links”

  1. #1 |  adolphus | 

    Help me out here. I have read Radley’s blog for a few years and I find myself growing more and more libertarian as a result. But there are still some things I don’t get. The credit card post here is one of them. My understanding is that the large credit card companies were using their formidable, near monopoly power (and having worked retail in a small mom and pop shop, I can attest they are bullies) to force fees on retail operations and not let those retail operations a) make consumers aware of those fees, b) adjust prices of goods based upon payment method to account for those fees, or even, c) pass those fees on to the consumer in any fashion. Now I don’t know the ins and outs of this new regulation, so I could be missing something, but isn’t it a good thing, or at least a good trend, to make those fees as transparent as possible and put the choice in the hands of the consumer whether the convenience of paying for something via a debit card, credit card, cash or check is worth extra fees? Why should people who pay cash subsidize a credit card users rewards program if they don’t want to?

    I pumped gas way back when gas stations charged different prices for cash and CC and the consumer saved at least 10 cents a gallon and the station shrank its overhead. We were forced to stop by the CC companies. Sure I guess we could have done without cc and done cash only, but that isn’t a winning business model in this day.

    Isn’t putting more choice in the consumer’s hands a good thing? Is it just that the DOJ is involved at all the reason to hate this move?

  2. #2 |  paranoiastrksdp | 

    http://www.philly.com/dailynews/local/20101006_Another_scandal__2_cops_held_in_drug_heist.html

    L-O-FUCKING-L.

  3. #3 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    Mr. Obama said Jesus Christ died for his sins, but the United States continues to suffer for the president’s mistakes.

    That’s some pretty righteous indignation you got there, Washington Times.

  4. #4 |  Andrew C | 

    Looking at the first link, I think the police officer may have acted appropriately. The article doesn’t say he refused to perform CPR – it says he claimed to not know it. Low-quality CPR is worthless, so that may have been correct.

    Also, I believe in asthma attacks, CPR has limited effectiveness. The issue is not poor function of the heart, the issue is constriction of the airway. All the chest-pumping in the world won’t open that airway back up. In that situation, I’d lean toward getting the patient to a medical provider ASAP, instead of delaying to provide poor CPR.

  5. #5 |  Mike Leatherwood | 

    From paranoia’s article:

    “I’m concerned about a systemic problem in this department, period, not just in the 25th District,” he [Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey] said. “You know, you wouldn’t have to clean house if the house wasn’t dirty to begin with.”

    Nothing like a blinding flash of the obvious…

  6. #6 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    @#2,
    No Cop Bingo this time as the FOP union boss says they won’t provide lawyers for the two and was actually critical of the two. And although the police chief says the cops will be fired, he should have said they were immediately fired and will be prosecuted to the full extent of the law. Charges include kidnapping, which is usually a serious offense (unless you’re a cop I guess). Let’s see if they get something like the 20 years the ex-cop wrongly convicted of child abuse got.

    For those not familiar, Philly police department is so crooked that nuking it from space is the only way to be sure you got rid of ‘em all.

  7. #7 |  Mike Leatherwood | 

    And I’m with AndrewC on the first article. Just because they were trained at the academy does not make them proficient. I was trained in the Navy for CPR…18 years ago. I doubt I could perform it effectively today.

    The article is a little sparse with details, but it does appear the officer traveled with and/or escorted the mother to the hospital. The child died one hour after arriving at the hospital. There are too many missing details with the obviously one-sided article to make a definitive conclusion.

  8. #8 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    I’m not saying he was right for shooting mouthy teens with their pants on the ground, but I understand.

  9. #9 |  Mattocracy | 

    Irony always seems to pass over the heads of politicians.

    Jim Demint: Homos and hoes shouldn’t be allowed to have the careers they want because I don’t approve of their actions.

    So said at The Greater Freedom Rally.

  10. #10 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    Judge Jack Camp is 67 years old and partying with blow, weed, and a stripper. Truthfully, how many on this board think that’s just a little impressive?

  11. #11 |  Bob | 

    “Sen. Jim DeMint: Gays and women who have premarital sex should be barred from classrooms.”

    LOL

    What about men that aren’t married and have a girlfriend? Not gunna exclude the fellas from being teachers if they’re single?

    Hypocrisy, thy name is Christianity.

    One of my problems with religious people is the sheer hubris with which they wave their ‘moral superiority’ simply because they claim to believe in a fictional account that has no basis in fact whatsoever, all the while never making the connection that their hubris and their ‘moral superiority’ are mutually exclusive.

  12. #12 |  Ben | 

    Yeah, agreed with Andrew and Mike on the first article. CPR probably wouldn’t have done any good with an asthma attack, and I’d rather a cop get the kid to the hospital than try to do CPR if they’re not confident with it. These parents are understandably distressed due to their child dying, but this lawsuit looks like BS to me.

  13. #13 |  Eric Hanneken | 

    Isn’t putting more choice in the consumer’s hands a good thing? Is it just that the DOJ is involved at all the reason to hate this move?

    No, the libertarian reason to object is that the DOJ is interfering in a voluntary contract between credit card companies and merchants.

    Absent coercion, credit card companies are free to offer their services with the condition that merchants can’t charge different prices based on method of payment, and they are free to offer their services without that condition. Also, merchants are free to offer money to credit card companies with or without that condition. The DOJ would like to remove choices from all parties to the negotiation.

    By insisting on that condition, American Express is reducing the value of its service, and thus lowering the fees that it is capable of charging merchants. Apparently they believe that they will make up for that because consumers will use their cards more.

    Merchants who accept American Express’ services will have to charge everyone more for their products, which will reduce their sales. Apparently they believe that they will make up for that because more consumers will buy more products.

    Consumers are free to buy at cash-only stores that charge less. If, as you write, “that isn’t a winning business model in this day,” then apparently most consumers are bothered less by the extra fees than they are by the inconvenience of making sure they have enough cash on them when they shop. However, some businesses are cash-only, so the market does serve price-sensitive consumers in places and situations where it is profitable to do so.

    Because the current arrangements are all voluntary, my presumption is that everyone involved is better off than they would be under other terms. But the DOJ thinks it knows better, so it is imposing its will on all parties, including, by the way, consumers.

  14. #14 |  djm | 

    Boyd,

    It IS impressive, and the truth is that people using drugs and strippers don’t bother me a whole lot. Not that I think it’s good – it’s just that I don’t care. No, what bothers me is the hypocrisy. How many people did Judge Camp put away for the same stuff during his 20 years? There are at least 2 mentioned in the article.

    Atlanta defense attorney Jack Martin said Camp was a well-read man who sometimes quoted Shakespeare from the bench.

    “It’s almost like a Shakespearean tragedy,” Martin said of Camp’s arrest.

    So Judge, you must be familiar with Iago, keeping up his reputation for honesty and integrity while engaging in exactly the practices he condems. And in the end, Iago gets busted for exactly that.

    Sound familiar, asshole?

  15. #15 |  Ben | 

    “But everyone would come to me and whisper that I shouldn’t back down. . .”

    That’s because you’re a joke and everyone’s enjoying watching your train wreck.

  16. #16 |  Pablo | 

    Yeah, I would have some admiration for the judge if not for the fact that he has a reputation as a “strict sentencer,” including non violent drug cases.

    http://www.ajc.com/news/atlanta/federal-judge-charged-with-658597.html

    Karma is a bitch.

  17. #17 |  Bob | 

    “NYPD cop refuses to give CPR to 11-year-old having an asthma attack. She died. He has been suspended.”

    He went with them to the hospital after hearing of the girl’s condition. What the fuck else was he supposed to do? Wave his magic wand and make her all better?

    It’s utterly ludicrous to expect cops to be versed in paramedic skills for all possible medical emergencies. Writing tickets and taking stolen car reports is hard enough.

    I know I sure as fuck don’t want some cop doing CPR on me, I’ll call 911 and wait for someone to get there with a fully stocked ambulance. And hey! He might have what this girl’s mom should have had… A Rescue Inhaler of some kind.

    If you ARE presented with an emergency that can’t wait for an ambulance. At least drive legally to the hospital. Driving like a nut and crashing into shit going the wrong way down a one way street isn’t helping the victim.

  18. #18 |  JS | 

    djm “No, what bothers me is the hypocrisy. How many people did Judge Camp put away for the same stuff during his 20 years? There are at least 2 mentioned in the article.”

    Yea that’s a good point!

  19. #19 |  donttread | 

    Your link to Jim DeMint really highlights one of the central problems of public schools – which values will be subsidized. Some parents (myself included) would have no problem sending their kids to a school with gay teachers, the important factor to me is their skill at teaching, not their sexual preference. Other parents feel strongly that this sets the wrong example. Neither point of view should be subsidized.

    The true libertarian solution would have parents responsible for choosing (and funding) their child’s education, and therefore responsible for choosing the school that best represents their values.

    A less libertarian solution, but far more reasonable than the current system, would give parents school vouchers, again allowing parents to chose how their children are educated.

  20. #20 |  qwints | 

    While I agree that the ‘purer’ libertarian position would respect the credit card companies and the merchants freedom of contract, there is also a long capitalist tradition recognizing the necessity of government intervention to prevent collusion between entities big enough to distort the market. Because of the unequal bargaining power between merchants and credit card companies as well as the natural monopoly which exists in the credit card industy, government intervention to prevent anti-competitive acts by American Express is appropriate.

    “People of the same trade seldom meet together, even for merriment and diversion, but the conversation ends in a conspiracy against the public”
    – Adam Smith

  21. #21 |  Mo | 

    Looking at the first link, I think the police officer may have acted appropriately. The article doesn’t say he refused to perform CPR – it says he claimed to not know it. Low-quality CPR is worthless, so that may have been correct.

    They should probably change the side of the police cars then.

    http://www.thecollaredsheep.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/NYPD-car.jpg

    In all seriousness, the worst part of it wasn’t that he didn’t perform CPR, but didn’t do anything to help, like call an ambulance, but instead prevented the woman from taking her daughter to the hospital. The dude must have realized he messed up because he ended up shaving his head right afterward to make it harder for witnesses to identify him.

    http://gothamist.com/2010/09/04/did_cop_shave_head_to_throw_off_wit.php

  22. #22 |  Nando | 

    Radley,

    The judge bought the drugs for himself and a stripper from an undercover cop, he didn’t buy them from a stripper.

  23. #23 |  trackerk | 

    I have a kid with asthma. I can breath in his mouth until I turn blue and you know what I’ll have? Two people who are turning blue.CPR doesn’t work with a compromised airway. Also, as it is taught these days, CPR is only comprised of chest compressions, not rescue breathing.

  24. #24 |  Eric Hanneken | 

    qwints, you might be interested in the sentences immediately following the one you quoted from Wealth of Nations (emphasis mine):

    People of the same trade seldom meet together, even for merriment and diversion, but the conversation ends in a conspiracy against the public, or in some contrivance to raise prices. It is impossible indeed to prevent such meetings, by any law which either could be executed, or would be consistent with liberty and justice. But though the law cannot hinder people of the same trade from sometimes assembling together, it ought to do nothing to facilitate such assemblies; much less to render them necessary. [Book I, Chapter 10, paragraph 82]

  25. #25 |  EvilDevilCuckoo | 

    DeMint broke my heart again. Considering our other senator is lindsay graham – there’s even more irony than many realize. Ok to be Gay senator that parades around as a conservative a few months before election and sells out the country the rest of the time – but not a teacher? What’s the difference really?

    I like a lot of what DeMint does but hate his social conservative crap. And that church – we call it the “Airport to Heaven”. they have a preacher pulling down about 200k and instead of people being embarassed, they brag about it “b/c we have the best choir in the state” or something stupid like that.

    We keep hearing the hard right clamoring that we need a “True Conservative” blah blah blah. Well, we’ve had a few and government still grew. It’s about time we have a Fiscal Conservative who’s a start raving liberal on social issues (in other words, a libertarian) and has the balls to call out the atrocity known as the drug war (among other things). Ain’t seen too many of those but it sure would be nice

  26. #26 |  Yizmo Gizmo | 

    There was a similar clueless cop/fire video on TV the other day.
    Suicidal man jumps from bridge. Dozens of cops look down as he jumps.
    Medical student/lifeguard swims to man, shouts at cops “Get yer
    asses down here.” No response. Man sinks. Man is brought up by lifeguard. Too late. Dies.
    Cops look down from bridge.
    http://www.philadelphiaweekly.com/news-and-opinion/suicide_watch-38338679.html.

  27. #27 |  qwints | 

    Eric, point made – that’s what I get for getting my quotations from Civilization 4. I stand by my argument, however, even without the support of Adam Smith.

  28. #28 |  Ben | 

    Mo – did we read the same article? It says that he accompanied the woman and girl to the hospital.

  29. #29 |  Danny | 

    Regarding Baltimore’s highway to nowhere:

    Isn’t it funny that every neighborhood where the residents all knew each other like family, and looked after each other’s kids, and got all their provisions from the local small independent businesses … just so happened to be demolished for government projects a few decades ago? Same old story whether it’s Baltimore’s West Side or Boston’s West End or some row of tenements in New York.

    Either there was a vast government conspiracy to specifically demolish the most content, idyllic and socially-integrated neighborhoods in America or, methinks, there is a wee excess of nostalgia for some pretty grim and rundown residential districts that were replaced with modern amenities.

    And note that this became a highway to nowhere because the NIMBYs managed to stop it in its tracks, thereby trash-canning a whole bunch of well-paid construction jobs and contributing to the current heavenly traffic situation in the Washington-Baltimore corridor.

  30. #30 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    djm,
    Of course, I agree exactly. Spitzer is another example of a douchebag prosecuting for the same things he himself does.

    Hard not to find hypocrisy everywhere in all-things government.

    Maybe the new saying should be “The lady doth preach too much, methinks.”

  31. #31 |  Cynical in CA | 

    “It’s not about Judge Camp being a judge. It is about Judge Camp being a husband and whether he has fulfilled those duties,” Morrison said….

    No hypocrisy here, move along …

    Earthquakes, hurricanes, tsunamis, cancer and … the drug war. We live in interesting times after all.

  32. #32 |  Cynical in CA | 

    #10 | Boyd Durkin — “Judge Jack Camp is 67 years old and partying with blow, weed, and a stripper. Truthfully, how many on this board think that’s just a little impressive?”

    As all get-out! What a way to go, the guy is pure inspiration.

  33. #33 |  Michael Chaney | 

    51,000 cubic tons of concrete

    Anybody know what a “cubic ton” is?

  34. #34 |  Marc | 

    Another vote of “cop did nothing wrong, this lawsuit is BS.” She was probably speeding (understandaly, granted), cop didn’t know why, stopped her, found out why, and accompanied her ot the friggin’ hospital, where she died an HOUR later! And why didn’t the mom have a rescue inhaler, and what the hell was CPR supposed to do to help? Even if it could, would you rather a guy who’s completely unsure of his ability to perform it trying, rather than just saying he doesn’t really know and rushing her to a professional?

    I’m outraged by the outrage… A protest over this? REALLY?!!!

  35. #35 |  Derfel Cadarn | 

    What about gay members of congress or child touching priests or homosexual members of the clergy or congressmen who hire prostitutes or ignorant politicians without a single fucking functioning brain cell Jimmy boy. Sit down and shutup your bothering the people doing some real thinking.

  36. #36 |  Eric Hanneken | 

    qwints: Fair enough. I will make a couple of points in response.

    Credit card companies (plural) are not a monopoly, natural or otherwise. Furthermore, there are substitutes for credit cards, including the aforementioned cash, checks, money orders, and debit cards (although the same businesses tend to be involved here).

    At this point, if a left libertarian is listening, he will usually explain how the corporations being discussed are actually huge beneficiaries of government subsidies and barriers to competition. This is undoubtably true in the case of credit card companies. However, limited competition is not no competition. The resulting contracts may be different and less efficient than the ones that would emerge from a more competitive market, but how does the DOJ know that? And how does the DOJ know that its particular vision is an improvement?

  37. #37 |  DarkEFang | 

    #29 Danny –

    “Either there was a vast government conspiracy to specifically demolish the most content, idyllic and socially-integrated neighborhoods in America or, methinks, there is a wee excess of nostalgia for some pretty grim and rundown residential districts that were replaced with modern amenities.”

    Or maybe people see low-income neighborhoods and assume they’re crime-ridden blights that need to be torn down?

  38. #38 |  qwints | 

    Eric, to briefly define terms (though I’m sure you already knew this*) a natural monopoly is one with high start up costs and large economies of scale. There are only 4 major credit card companies in the US – Visa, Mastercard, American Express and Discover with the first two representing 80% of the market (473 million out of 576 million cards). Furthermore, demand for credit card services among merchants is fairly inelastic as the inability to process credit cards is devastating for most businesses due to the trend away from cash. The averages business’s bargaining power is therefore so low in comparison to a major credit card company that truly anticompetitive behavior is possible – a major company can in theory lock out cheaper cards by abusing its market share. (Although American Express does have a decent argument that its market share (roughly 10%) is too small to truly affect the market).

    Assuming that anticompetitive behavior is possible, I believe that governmental action is appropriate. Market shaping actions by major players represent a failure of the market which leads to inefficiency. Although there’s no problem with a company dominating a market by being better at what it does than its competitors, that company should not be allowed to exploit its position by locking out competitors through anti-competitive agreements.

    *Not trying to be sarcastic here.

  39. #39 |  Mo | 

    Ben,

    Read the related links “Briana Ojeda’s mother wants cop who blocked her way to hospital to come forward and apologize” and “Clueless cop, who didn’t help girl, shaved head after tragedy”

  40. #40 |  JOR | 

    Personally, hypocrisy doesn’t bother me one little bit.

    If someone is helping send nonviolent people to prison, or enabling bigotry in some way, that’s objectionable in its own right – regardless of their private habits or vices. A hardened drug warrior could be honest to god straight fucking edge, that wouldn’t make him any better than a judge that sends potheads to prison by day and snorts cocaine off strippers’ asses while whacking off to gay kiddie porn by night.

  41. #41 |  Coises | 

    adolphus @ 1:

    My understanding is that the large credit card companies were using their formidable, near monopoly power (and having worked retail in a small mom and pop shop, I can attest they are bullies) to force fees on retail operations and not let those retail operations a) make consumers aware of those fees, b) adjust prices of goods based upon payment method to account for those fees, or even, c) pass those fees on to the consumer in any fashion. Now I don’t know the ins and outs of this new regulation, so I could be missing something, but isn’t it a good thing, or at least a good trend, to make those fees as transparent as possible and put the choice in the hands of the consumer whether the convenience of paying for something via a debit card, credit card, cash or check is worth extra fees? Why should people who pay cash subsidize a credit card users rewards program if they don’t want to?

    This is a good example of the difference between “right” and “left” libertarians. In United States politics, right-side libertarians outnumber left-side so greatly that most people are probably unaware that the latter even exist. I am told (but do not have direct knowledge) that in the rest of the world, the situation is nearly reversed.

    “Freedom of contract” is a primary cornerstone of the right-side libertarian approach; it’s often added to “life, liberty and property” as one of the basic rights government is properly constituted to protect. In this view, merchants are free to refuse a contract with a credit card company if they don’t like it. Should enough merchants reject such contracts, the credit card company will be forced to change them; if the backlash is insufficient to force a change in terms, then the terms were not as onerous to the merchants as they were beneficial to the credit card companies, and it is appropriate that they should stand.

    In contrast to the right-side libertarian concern with the principle of government as a protector of fundamental rights which should otherwise leave us alone, left-side libertarians think more in terms of diminishing the practical power of “coërcive institutions.” Ideally, we’d like to see no person or group have any more power than anyone else. That’s not to say we want “equality” in a communist sense at all — but differences should stem from things like innovation, effort, skill, social contribution, maybe even just plain luck; but not from power. So from our perspective, the credit card companies here are essentially using their market power to limit merchants’ freedom. In my personal opinion, that’s not the end of the argument; the complexity of varying prices and other confusions and possible mis-directed incentives could mean that the best overall choice is to offer the consumer one price and let the merchants and credit card companies work out the rest between themselves. It’s far beyond my scope of knowledge to offer an opinion on that.

  42. #42 |  Mr. Garrison | 

    That Senator DeMint just burns me up Mr. Hand. How’d he like to get in here and try to teach these snot-nosed little brats.

  43. #43 |  Salt | 

    RE: DeMint

    “The U.S. Constitution, he said, puts the people in charge, and crowds are becoming involved because they want spending stopped.”

    Wrong. The U.S. Constitution, by design opened the doors for the continuous transfer of power from the people to the state. From 1791 through today, I’d say it has been quite successful. If it was created for another purpose, then it has proven itself an utter failure. The Anti-Federalists foresaw this.

    Whenever I hear a politician spew ‘constitution this, constitution that, red flags go up.

    “But everyone would come to me and whisper that I shouldn’t back down. They don’t want government purging their rights and their freedom to religion.”

    That is precisely what DeMint wanting to do by legislating his personal belief system upon the entire country.

  44. #44 |  Marty | 

    re: Demint… the things that stand out to me… he’s bragging about being against a $400,000 program because he wants to reduce the budget… that’s like cutting grass on the great plains with safety scissors. Hell, I doubt that would cover Spitzer’s hooker bills.

    This guy has issues with gays and single women… I can’t wait to see what’s unleashed from his twisted closet!

  45. #45 |  Marty | 

    how sweet would it be for an inmate suffering from Camp’s tough sentencing on victimless crimes policy to get Camp for a cell mate?

  46. #46 |  John Wilburn | 

    #33 Michael Chaney

    Cubic ton

    A Cubic ton is a measure of volume (compare fluid ounce). It is no longer used in the United Kingdom but seems to be still in use in the USA, see “definitions” below.

    Definitions
    A mass-derived unit of volume must be defined by reference to the density of some material. In the case of the fluid ounce, this is water. For the cubic ton, the situation is more complex—there are different cubic tons for different materials.

    The Reader’s Digest Great Encyclopaedic Dictionary gives the following ton-derived volumes:

    Timber, 40 cubic feet
    Stone, 16 cubic feet
    Salt, 42 bushels
    Lime, 40 bushels
    Coke, 28 bushels
    Wheat, 20 bushels
    Defining a cubic ton presents some difficulties because:

    It is uncertain whether the above figures are based on the long ton or the short ton
    Organic materials, such as timber, vary in density
    The nearest thing to a standard cubic ton seems to be the “timber” cubic ton (40 cubic feet) which is used by freight transport operators in the USA, ref: [1] and [2]

    Conversions
    1 cubic ton (40 cubic feet) = 1.133 cubic metres
    1 cubic metre = 0.883 cubic tons (35.32 cubic feet)
    These are approximate conversions, based on a cubic ton of 40 cubic feet, and will be subject to rounding errors.

  47. #47 |  Helmut O' Hooligan | 

    Bob:

    “If you ARE presented with an emergency that can’t wait for an ambulance. At least drive legally to the hospital. Driving like a nut and crashing into shit going the wrong way down a one way street isn’t helping the victim”

    Yeah, I know. While working in healthcare security I have seen people drive into the ER lot and hop curbs, squeal tires and come damn close to hitting pedestrians. Often times their patients are not as serious as the child from this story. But I don’t say anything to most of them, because I know they will just play the “it’s an emergency card” and lodge a bullshit complaint about me. I will however, be a great witness against them in court if they hit someone in our ED lot.

    Here’s an idea: Call a damn ambulance and worry about the fucking bill later. It’s kind of counterproductive if you kill a bunch of people (possibly even the patient) en-route to the ER.

  48. #48 |  Dr. T | 

    RE: NYPD cop refuses to give CPR to 11-year-old

    I find it ironic that the motto of the New York Police Department is “Fidelis ad Mortem” (Faithful Unto Death). Perhaps the officer in question misunderstood the motto and thought it meant unto the death of the people he is supposed to protect. Thankfully, as shown by the actions of the NYPD on 9/11/01, this recent situation is an aberration, not the norm.

  49. #49 |  Dr. T | 

    #13 “… Because the current arrangements are all voluntary…”

    The arrangements are voluntary but essentially non-negotiable for most businesses. If you own a small- or medium-sized business, you lack the clout to negotiate credit card usage terms with Visa, MasterCard, or American Express. If you don’t take their standard terms, they won’t negotiate and they won’t process credit card payments. Multiple small businesses could try to form a bargaining unit to negotiate with the credit card companies, but that action would be considered anti-competitive under current laws! (Doctors tried that with health insurance companies and were slapped down in court.)

  50. #50 |  Dr. T | 

    Numerous people commented that CPR will not help with an asthma attack. Certainly the cardiac component is unhelpful. However, artificial respiration may help if the asthmatic has become totally exhausted from trying to breathe through narrowed airways. In those cases, mouth-to-mouth resuscitation can be a life saver.

  51. #51 |  croaker | 

    @26 And these are the same clown cops who arrest rescuers after the fact.

  52. #52 |  Joe Mama | 

    Regarding the wealth of the Presidents – I went from the first interesting story towards the last and, at the end, see “Obama is the grandson of a goat herder.”

    How appropriate.

  53. #53 |  croaker | 

    Cop arrested after shooting DV suspect and dog:

    http://www.kpho.com/valleynews/25303371/detail.html

  54. #54 |  croaker | 

    More police professionalism:

    http://www.myfoxdfw.com/dpp/news/100510-trooper-charged-for-excessive-force

  55. #55 |  croaker | 

    Early this morning the FBI launched a massive public corruption takedown in San Juan, Puerto Rico, as our agents fanned out across the island to begin arresting 133 subjects—the majority of them police officers.

    http://www.fbi.gov/page2/oct10/sanjuan_100610.html

    (Good luck shoveling back the ocean with a fork, fellas!)

  56. #56 |  IrishRaul | 

    On DeMint’s comments … it’s sad to see this kind of thing isn’t confined to a-backwards South Carolina. This from supposedly liberal Portland, Oregon.

    http://blogtown.portlandmercury.com/BlogtownPDX/archives/2010/09/30/breaking-beaverton-teacher-says-he-was-fired-for-mentioning-in-class-that-he-would-choose-to-marry-a-man

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