Give Thanks for Your Freedom, Son, Or I’m Sending You to Jail

Wednesday, October 6th, 2010

I have a feeling this story will soon be national news. From the NMissCommentor, a legal blog in Mississippi:

[Attorney] Danny Lampley . . . was jailed by Chancery Court Judge Littlejohn in Tupelo for failing to recite the pledge of allegiance in open court today.  Danny was one of the local lawyers who represented the plaintiff in the Pontotoc school prayer case years ago, working with the ACLU and People for the American Way.

I’m informed that Danny rose and was respectful, but did not recite the pledge…

The order incarcerating him provides:

BE IT REMEMBERED, this date, the Court having ordered all present in the courtroom to stand and recite the Pledge of Allegience, and having found that Danny Lampley, Attorney at Law, failed and refused to do so, finds said Danny Lampley to be in criminal contempt of court.

The order states that for this, Danny Lampley “is hereby ordered to be incaraerated in that Lee County jail.” The order continues:

IT IS FURTHER ORDED, ADJUDGED, AND DECREED, that Danny Lampley shall purge himself of said criminal contempt by complying with the order of this Court by standing and reciting the Pledge of Allegiance in open court.

I’d say it’s time Judge Littlejohn turned in his robe. This is just astonishingly ignorant, arrogant, and thuggish. Oh, and illegal. It’s also way illegal. Like, not even close.

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85 Responses to “Give Thanks for Your Freedom, Son, Or I’m Sending You to Jail”

  1. #1 |  Aresen | 

    I am hoping that that is a hoax, but, as we are talking about Mississippi, that is a faint hope.

  2. #2 |  freedomfan | 

    I would love to hear that judge explain if his actions advanced the cause of “liberty and justice” more than the cause of “obedience to authority”. I am pretty sure one of those things is mentioned in the Pledge.

    Too many judges don’t understand that they are not dictators, even in the courtroom. Sadly, there are seldom any consequences to disabuse them of that notion.

  3. #3 |  piasa | 

    Gavel, Badge, (Elected Office), all seem to make their holders immune to the effects of common sense.

  4. #4 |  StrongStyle81 | 

    It’s a shame the “just like the Nazi’s” card gets pulled out so much that it has become meaningless, because jailing someone for not pledging allegiance to a government state is pretty damn fascist.

  5. #5 |  John Jenkins | 

    That order is facially invalid: I can’t believe any deputy executed it, and the ones who did vitiated their qualified immunity when they did. I don’t know whether a federal civil rights suit could be filed against the judge, but the order is so ridiculous, one might be successful.

  6. #6 |  The Johnny Appleseed Of Crack | 

    Can someone who is knowledgable about courtroom law explain, in simple terms, under what conditions can a judge find you in contempt of court, and what are the allowable punishments?

  7. #7 |  John Jenkins | 

    What counts as contempt varies from state to state (in some states it is provided for by statute, in others it is a creature of common law).

    Generally it’s things like not obeying court orders (indirect contempt) or behaving like a jackass in the judge’s presence (direct contempt).

    There is also a division between civil contempt and criminal contempt, and different protections attach for criminal contempt.

    Without a jury trial the judge can toss you in the pokey for up to 180 days, if I remember right (that could be state specific, YMMV).

    Some civil contempt can be purged (i.e., you comply with the order). If you are in the pokey for civil contempt, it can be indefinite so long as you can purge the contempt (you have the “keys to the cell” if you choose to use them).

  8. #8 |  the innominate one | 

    Does Mississippi still allow judges who haven’t passed the bar to be elected to office?

    Based on this guy, I’m guessing the answer is yes.

  9. #9 |  Aresen | 

    I have to call this hearsay, but one of the commenters on the linked site wrote:


    “You’d think Littlejohn ought to be removed from the bench. But he’s running unopposed for re-election.

    (Just to depress everyone further.)

  10. #10 |  T'Mershi Duween | 

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7IFbJU0VWhE

  11. #11 |  Chris | 

    Rope!

  12. #12 |  Chris | 

    Rope!

  13. #13 |  Salvo | 

    Jesus. It’s nigh impossible to sue a judge, but this just might be one of those cases.

  14. #14 |  EH | 

    can judges be brought up on bivens charges?

  15. #15 |  Bergman | 

    This is a pretty clear cut case of civil rights violation. The thing is, the exact nature of the violation isn’t civil, it’s criminal. Jailing someone for exercise of first amendment rights is a federal level felony. Perhaps someone should forward this judge’s particulars to the FBI?

  16. #16 |  Kevin3% | 

    MORE ROPE!

  17. #17 |  Derfel Cadarn | 

    It appears that knowledge of the law is not required to be a judge in ole Miss. Also a large percentage of our elected officials are lawyers why is it that they know so little about the law? Could it be that the law is only for the control of little people? Look at your “leaders” behavior then make up your own minds.

  18. #18 |  Michael Chaney | 

    Too many judges don’t understand that they are not dictators, even in the courtroom.

    Oh, he quite well is a dictator in his courtroom if he gets away with this. And he probably will. The only way to sanction a judge is for other judges to do it, and you have to do something worse than this to get them riled. I hate to say it, but someone probably has to fix this in an extrajudicial manner to make anything change.

  19. #19 |  ZappaCrappa | 

    You WILL pay lip service to a country that you didn’t ask to be born in and you WILL love it because it’s the best damn country on the planet and you SHOULD be F’ng grateful you ungrateful bastard!!!!

    Thrown in jail for not reciting the pledge of allegiance…priceless. I smell a little more than a hint of Nazi mentallity in this. I stopped reciting the pledge long ago as I have found it to be hollow and meaningless. And I’m a 10 year USMC war vet.

    What he SHOULD do is get up in court and just recite the following part over and over and over….”with liberty and JUSTICE for ALL!”

  20. #20 |  pam | 

    “here’s to the land you’ve torn out the heart of”-Phil Ochs

    tears for beautiful Mississippi.

  21. #21 |  marco73 | 

    Judge Littlejohn – that almost sounds made up. I’d like to see Dave Chappel do one of his patented Little John comedy sketches:
    “The pledge of allegiance”
    “WHAT!”
    “The pledge of allegiance”
    “WHAT!”
    “The pledge of allegiance”
    “WHAT!”
    “Go to jail!”
    “OK!”

  22. #22 |  John Wilburn | 

    I think the basis of the problem is that we refer to these folks, collectively, as “the government.” We should always and only refer to them, collectively (including the president, the congress and the supreme court), as “the civil service.” (The operative term being, “service.”)

    “Government” is defined as;
    “the political direction and control exercised over the actions of the members, citizens or inhabitants of communities, societies and states”

    This states, in effect, that “government” is the authority to direct and control the actions of anyone and everyone, anytime, anyplace, at its whim…

    What happened to “government by consent of the governed?” What happened to “no one may be compelled to do anything against his will, without due process of law?”

    In other words, given that I am going about my lawful pursuits, NO ONE has the authority to tell me to do anything – including some asshole judge who thinks his word is law…

    Somewhere along the way, the “civil servants” have confused themselves, have shrugged off their, “servants of the people” capacity, and have taken on the mantle of, “herders of the sheeple.” And WE have “consented” to it…

    Something, other than talking, needs to be done, to eliminate this confusion – we are rapidly approaching the point (or may already be there) where tar-and-feathers, nooses and gunfire are the only viable means to turn these lackeys around…

  23. #23 |  SamK | 

    Full video

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=njb6X-nmW2M&feature=related

  24. #24 |  SamK | 

    Bah, wrong thread.

  25. #25 |  Darryl | 

    For what it is worth (not much I know);

    I just sent a quick email to the Mississippi Tourism Board. I wrote that I would not be considering a family vacation to their state soon and linked to the Reason article as the explanation. I recommend also suggesting that for every one person who writes, thousands of others think the same but don’t write.

    Money (sometimes) talks.

    Sincerely,
    A guy without much hope

  26. #26 |  Pablo | 

    Of course this is outrageous, but I’m not surprised. Since it’s Mississippi this will probably enhance his chances for re election.

    As a criminal defense attorney in Georgia I get a lot of calls from rural counties, out in the middle of nowhere, about judges doing similar outrageous things. Unfortunately the only way to hold them accountable is to take things to the appellate level and most poor SOBs in those places don’t have the resources or the wherewithal to do so.

  27. #27 |  JS | 

    Pablo “Of course this is outrageous, but I’m not surprised. Since it’s Mississippi this will probably enhance his chances for re election.”

    Yep, now he looks like the great patriot who took on the evil anti-American ACLU guy. He might even get Toby Keith to sing at a benefit for his election. Hell he could become Mississippi’s next Senator.

  28. #28 |  Sky | 

    #27…”Hell he could become Mississippi’s next Senator.”

    Or governor!

  29. #29 |  Splendid One | 

    Judge Littlejohn’s office: (662) 534-6835. I just politely told his administrator what I thought of this.

  30. #30 |  John | 

    Has Judge Littlejohn signed his deal with Fox News yet?

  31. #31 |  MS judge jails lawyer for not reciting Pledge of Allegience « The Word Warrior | 

    [...] justice watchdog Radley Balko calls for Littlejohn to resign: I’d say it’s time Judge Littlejohn turned in his robe. This is just astonishingly ignorant, [...]

  32. #32 |  Sky | 

    Go rate this judge…

    http://www.ratethecourts.com/index.php?which=name&name=Kitchens&nameSubmit=Search

  33. #33 |  Yizmo Gizmo | 

    The deep South…such enduring respect for the Stars and Stripes.
    And the Nation.
    Except for that Civil War thing. And Civil Rights. And…

  34. #34 |  Bob | 

    #27…”Hell he could become Mississippi’s next Senator.”

    Or governor!

    Or Grand Dragon of the realm!

  35. #35 |  ParatrooperJJ | 

    Out of curiosity what do you think is illegal about this order? Also don’t judges have absolute immunity and not qualified immunity?

  36. #36 |  perlhaqr | 

    I feel a bit silly quoting a children’s movie on this subject, but as “Hot Rod” said in the original Transformers: The Movie (1986), “I have nothing but contempt for this court!”

  37. #37 |  MetaEd | 

    If you are going to rate this judge at RateTheCourts, don’t follow Sky’s link (#32). Already ten people have been misled to vote on some judge called Kitchens. The correct link to rate Judge Talmadge Littlejohn is “http://www.ratethecourts.com/judge.php?id=177588″, or you can go to the home page and do a search by name.

  38. #38 |  Exterminator | 

    Littlejohn is about 85 years old and senile. Apparently someone convinced him he’d made a big mistake and he let the guy out about 5 hours later without requiring him to recite.

    This kind of crap isn’t limited to Mississippi, so some of you clean your own glass houses before getting to high on your horses. Yes, Littlejohn is an idiot, probably from senility or worse, but he’s not the first to pull a stunt like this. I’m hoping he pays the big price and is removed by the JPC.

  39. #39 |  JS | 

    Judge: “I’m sending you to jail to PROVE to you that we live in the freest country in the world!”

  40. #40 |  Pete | 

    To finish that Phil Ochs quote:

    Here’s to the land that you’ve torn out the heart of,
    Mississippi find yourself another country to be part of.

  41. #41 |  Todd | 

    Hehe, I grew up in Tupelo, so I’m getting a kick, etc. My hometown makes The Agitator and Fark…awesome

    Loved to say I surprised, but not at all…though I am eagerly awaiting the fallout…

  42. #42 |  John Jenkins | 

    @ParatrooperJJ: I will assume that you are being genuine and answer your question. The Supreme Court decided in West Virginia State Board of Education v. Barnette, 319 U.S. 624 (1943), that the state could not compel one to recite the pledge (relying on free speech grounds, and rejecting an earlier case that permitted compulsion in finding that free exercise was an insufficient ground for prohibiting compulsion). Since then, it has been clearly established First Amendment doctrine that the state and federal governments cannot compel someone to say something that he does not agree with. The fact that there is specific precedent on the specific issue of the pledge itself just makes the chancellor’s action more egregious.

  43. #43 |  Marc | 

    The scary part is this was a minor incident. A judge with this lack of common sense also holds the fates of others with more serious offenses in his hands. Maybe someone needs to look at some of the judge’s past decisions and see what form of rationale was used in handing down sentences.

  44. #44 |  Sean L. | 

    So accused rapists and murderers enjoy the right to remain silent, but I don’t?

  45. #45 |  Judge Littlejohn | 

    Ma courtroom was crunk’d. Y’all foos beta recognize ma pledga leejentz!

  46. #46 |  JonnyCarbon | 

    http://www.lewrockwell.com/dilorenzo/dilorenzo54.html
    The Pledge of Allegiance is an oath of allegiance to the omnipotent, Lincolnian state. Its purpose was never to inculcate in children the ideals of the American founding fathers, but those of two eccentric nineteenth-century socialists.

    the author of the Pledge was one Francis Bellamy, a defrocked Baptist minister from Boston who identified himself as a Christian Socialist and who preached in his pulpit that “Jesus was a socialist.”

    Bellamy intended the Pledge of Allegiance to be a vow of allegiance to the state, a quintessentially un-American idea.

    The Bellamy cousins decided that American youth needed to be taught “loyalty to the state” because they realized that the individualism and the love of liberty of the American founding fathers would always stand in the way of achieving the socialist utopia

    The “one nation, indivisible” wording was especially important to the Bellamy cousins, for if secession were legitimized, their pipe dream of socialism through a consolidated, monopoly government would be destroyed.

  47. #47 |  land of the free? | 

    [...] Lampley comply, and Lampley repeated his objection.  Then he was thrown in jail.  As The Agitator put it, “Give thanks for your freedom, son, or I’m sending you to jail.”  This is a [...]

  48. #48 |  Irving Washington | 

    Marco, that’s hysterical.

    On a related note, it sure would be wrong to call his office demanding he release the lawyer. Definitely don’t do that over and over.

    http://www.mssc.state.ms.us/trialcourts/chancerycourt/chanjud.pdf

  49. #49 |  BamBam | 

    How about not rising when “all rise” is dictated? I have read of people being arrested for not rising. Why should one rise for a person, as if they are my superior and master? This is another piece of “history” that has to go — never should have existed.

  50. #50 |  Kevin3% | 

    Paratrooper:
    Pledging allegiance to a flag and to a “Republic” (that no longer exists) which it is supposed to represent is mindless obedience to government.

    …and please explain the part about “liberty and justice for all”. Where is the justice when members of that government work daily to usurp their authority? Where is our liberty when members of that government work daily to infringe, without due process of law, under color of law, and abrogate the very law they swore an oath to defend?

  51. #51 |  rumpole | 

    @John Jenkins:
    Well said. And it’s the fact that it’s a well-established right is what might strip those that executed the order of their qualified immunity. (I think this is a tougher case, as although the judge is wrong, there’s a process to correct it–appeal, not lawsuits.). There has got to be a way to get his imprisonment into federal court.

  52. #52 |  Chris in AL | 

    I lived in Tupelo for many years. My parents are still there (though I don’t know why). And I lived in Pontotoc when that previous case was going on. This surprises me not at all. One might think that in this day and age something like this can’t happen. But let me assure you that Mississippi is NOT in this day and age. It is like Little House on the Prairie, but with pick up trucks.

  53. #53 |  SpecKK | 

    After a friends suggestion, I stand and pledge allegiance to the constitution.

    An alternative pledge to uphold the principles associated with practicing law and the civil system should be made available when someone refuses to support unconstitutional statism like this.

  54. #54 |  John Jenkins | 

    The judge’s absolute immunity does *not* protect him from criminal prosecutions, only from civil liability. He could still be charged with a criminal civil rights violation, but it’s unlikely here.

  55. #55 |  Bookerdann | 

    Note that the lawyer wasn’t jailed for not pledging allegiance to the United States of America. He was jailed for not pledging allergenic to the FLAG of the United States of America. Maybe the judge should be jailed for forcing people to pledge allegiance to a piece of cloth instead of their country.

    All that’s missing is the banjo music and Ned Beatty squealing like a pig.

  56. #56 |  Rebecca | 

    I live in Mississippi and I am appalled by this Judge’s action. I would also like to say that there are people like this all over this country, not just in Mississippi. I know there are a lot of reasons to hate on my state but I wish everyone would realize that there are a LOT of us here who do not and will not ever stand for what people like this Judge represent. Just sayin’. We aren’t all bastards down here and not all bastards live in Mississippi.

  57. #57 |  Sky | 

    #35 wrote “Out of curiosity what do you think is illegal about this order?”

    That you even need to ask speaks VOLUMES!

    #37 wrote “Already ten people have been misled to vote on some judge called Kitchens.”

    It wasn’t an attempt to mislead. While I was there I also voted on Kitchens (who happens to be a Judge referenced in several articles by the Agitator) and I copy/pasted the last link I used. Kitchens should also be disbarred

  58. #58 |  JS | 

    Sky “#35 wrote “Out of curiosity what do you think is illegal about this order?”

    That you even need to ask speaks VOLUMES!”

    Then include me too because I didn’t know it was illegal or why. I’m not a lawyer and I’ve learned a lot since I started reading this blog from the commenters, but I didn’t know why it was illegal.

  59. #59 |  Sky | 

    Just as the government can’t force someone to pray they can’t force you to pledge your allegiance to any country.

  60. #60 |  Kevin3% | 

    #57 JS:

    That is the point. It is not illegal!!!

    This black robed criminal is so full of himself and so drunk with his power that he thinks he can demand anything and woe be unto anyone who disagrees.

    Just because a cop, a prosecutor, a judge says something is illegal does not make it so. This blog is replete with examples of agents of the state lying, using intimidation and coercion to get their way.

    None of it makes any of their actions legal.

  61. #61 |  JS | 

    I hate to admit it but I didn’t know that.

  62. #62 |  Yizmo Gizmo | 

    “This black robed criminal is so full of himself and so drunk with his power that he thinks he can demand anything and woe be unto anyone who disagrees.”

    Get off your high horse, Kevin. The Judge has a hard job to do
    and the first step toward directing fair and proper court proceedings is order. Order in the Court.

    The Pledge of Allegiance is part of that protocol. The attorney is an Officer of the Court and has an Affirmative Duty to comply with protocol.
    Or maybe prefer you prefer screaming and kicking in the aisles, such as you often see in Communist regimes, where indoctrination is compulsory.

  63. #63 |  John Jenkins | 

    @Kevin: I am not sure using pronouns is helping you here. The chancellor’s order is facially invalid and illegal.

  64. #64 |  John Jenkins | 

    @Yizmo: Your statement of the law is incorrect. If the attorney had actively disrupted the saying of the pledge, or disrupted court proceedings in some other way, then a finding of contempt might be supportable. However, a finding of contempt for simply failing to recite the pledge is facially unconstitutional and invalid. Judicial officers are not free from constitutional restraints, even with the broad authority they are often given to regulate conduct in the courtroom.

  65. #65 |  GT | 

    @JohnJenkins: you wrote “I can’t believe any deputy executed it”… are you out of your mind? There has never been a tyranny that has not been aided by badge-wearing whip-kissing thug-drones.

    In fact, it’s the one constant of politics: without a cadre of thugs to enforce the political class’s whims, living by the ‘political means’ (force and fraud) is impossible.

    Thug-drones opened fire on students at kent State; thug-drones wielded batons to uphold Jim Crow; thug-drones shot Jean Charles de Menezes in the back of the head seven times; thug-drones killed Ian Tomlinson.

    They shoot puppies as a matter of daily routine, for fuck’s sake. And you’re shocked that they could find one in Redneck Wonderland who was prepared to do exactly as he was told, like a good house nigger? Sheeee-t.

    Cheerio

    GT

  66. #66 |  GT | 

    Oh – and I forgot… this ‘pledging allegiance’ thing that you Yanks do is fucking creepy. Absolutely fucking creeps me out. it’s primitive and atavistic – and typically American in its sloganeering-trumps-reality meme. It’s like soemthing from a Soviet archive.

    Fortunately, the US is in the process of the biggest national ‘an hero’ since Rome (arguably, you could make the case that the British or Spanish imperial an heroes were larger than Rome).

    And yes, ‘an hero’ is now a noun (and also a verb, even).

    Pledging allegiance? Fucking creepy. As creepy as child pronography, and only possible if you indoctrinate (i.e., psychologically abuse) your children. Just like religion…

    Cheerio

    GT

  67. #67 |  Cynical in CA | 

    “I’d say it’s time Judge Littlejohn turned in his robe.”

    Littlejohn? More like the Sheriff of Nottingham.

  68. #68 |  Cynical in CA | 

    With you all the way GT. My kids know they have options. So do their school principals, courtesy of me.

  69. #69 |  JS | 

    GT “Oh – and I forgot… this ‘pledging allegiance’ thing that you Yanks do is fucking creepy. Absolutely fucking creeps me out. it’s primitive and atavistic – and typically American in its sloganeering-trumps-reality meme.”

    That was really well said!

  70. #70 |  Bergman | 

    Title 18, Chapter 13, Section 242 of the US Code. Government officials, such as judges or prosecutors or police, do not have immunity under that statute.

  71. #71 |  Uptownbro41 | 

    yeah no, but how does that “God Save The Queen” song go, all modern-like & unatavistically I’m sure?

  72. #72 |  croaker | 

    @22

    “In a mature society, ‘civil servant’ is semantically equal to ‘civil master’.”

    Robert Heinlein, speaking as Lazarus Long.

  73. #73 |  Donald | 

    It would be so awsome if he said OK and then soon as the words “and liberty and justice for all” passed he lips he would add “except in the mother Fing courtroom bitch” then gave the judge the finger and dropped his pants.

  74. #74 |  Dan | 

    If someone is being forced to say the pledge, perhaps they could use the original raised hand salute, just to keep it authentic.

    Resisting the collective is draining. A Cuban I knew said sometimes as a kid she would get worn out from her passive resistance to State worship and when she was tired sometimes it was just easier to put on the red bandana, salute the flag, and sing the patriotic song.

  75. #75 |  Sky | 

    #56 Rebecca wrote “I live in Mississippi and I am appalled by this Judge’s action. I would also like to say that there are people like this all over this country, not just in Mississippi. I know there are a lot of reasons to hate on my state but I wish everyone would realize that there are a LOT of us here who do not and will not ever stand for what people like this Judge represent. Just sayin’. We aren’t all bastards down here and not all bastards live in Mississippi.”

    Agreed Rebecca but you are assuredly in a minority there.

  76. #76 |  You Can’t Force People to Say the Pledge of Allegiance | theConstitutional.org | 

    [...] but didn’t speak.) “Give thanks for your freedom, son, or I’m sending you to jail,” is how Radley Balko (The Agitator) [...]

  77. #77 |  pam | 

    well, maybe if we say it enough over and over we’ll believe there is liberty and justice for all.

    JS-“soviet archive” lol

  78. #78 |  pam | 

    I think that would be GT not JS. ooops

  79. #79 |  NomDeWeb | 

    In high school, I once refused to stand for the pledge. My French teacher, a naturalized citizen from Panama whose French accent was…interesting, insisted that I stand up for my country; she either didn’t notice or didn’t understand why I saluted the flag with a straight arm…

  80. #80 |  pam | 

    do you think the judge was looking for trouble? The lawyer wasn’t being pro-active he was being passive; the judge seemed to pick his non-moving lips out a of a crowd of moving lips and this drew the judge’s contempt.

    Personally, I’ve always felt that pledges and songs we are required to recite and sing before various public functions (games, school concerts, courts, meetings etc, etc.) are voluntary. I never felt participation was mandatory. I never felt I could be arrested for not participating (or participating) whichever the case may be. Regurgitating silly meaningless words on demand should be a choice.

  81. #81 |  End-of-the-week links « The Country Estate | 

    [...] Andrew Sullivan, Radley Balko: Tupelo, Miss. judge Talmadge Littlejohn sends an attorney to jail for refusing to recite the Pledge of Allegiance in court. Oh my God. This is our country. Leaving [...]

  82. #82 |  Al Tyler | 

    When a judge violates an attorney’s first Amendment right to freedom of speech as well as possible Civil Rights Violations (regardless of his otherwise stellar record) … then perhaps it’s time for said judge to retire. That or be disbarred.

  83. #83 |  Edward | 

    I have had dealings with Judge Littlejohn before. He quoted the bible from the bench while I was on the stand. My ex-wife was caught lying on the stand but he did nothing to her. He also, in his final ruling on the case, after my ex-wife testified that she had lied about being molested by her step-father, said that he knew that girls that age lied about that kind of thing and then went on to give her custody of our two sons, both of whom she allows to go and stay with her step-father and mother at least once a week on average and at that time was living right next door to them. (She was removed from the home when she was 13 after she testified before another Judge saying that she was being physically and sexually abused by her step-father, but when this was brought up in court during our divorce and custody hearing (2008) she said that she had lied about that and was not molested even though she had voluntairly given me custody of the boys in 2003 and had agreed to not leave the boys in the care of her step-father). And in 2009, Judge Littlejohn allowed her to keep custody of the boys even though she admitted under oath to having struck one of the boys on the back leaving a hand print (pictures were presented as evidence) because he had thrown a Nerf bullet at her. And one of my sons informed me recently that his step-grandfather had thrown another child across the bed into the floor one night when several of them had been left there to spend the night while their parents were out. And to let you know, I have court documents and pictures to back up what I have said here.

  84. #84 |  Edward | 

    I want to add something to my previous comment. I also have 3 other boys from a prior marriage, of which I have SOLE custody of them. But yet, Judge Littlejohn did not think I should be allowed to keep custody of my 2 youngest sons. Yes, I said keep because at the time of the first hearing (2004) I had temporary custody of them. My then wife, had walked out and left them with me in 2003 and had voluntairly given me temporary custody and had agreed in the Court Order to NOT leave the children in the care of her step-father due to what he did to her when she was a child, per her testimony back then.

    If anyone wants to contact me then you may do so at my email.
    edward327@hotmail.com

  85. #85 |  Ron Paul Pumpkin, Jailed for not saying pledge, Dangerous business-children, and other Mixed Links « Political News Online | 

    [...] Give thanks for your freedom, or go to jail! [...]

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