Morning Links

Tuesday, September 7th, 2010
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51 Responses to “Morning Links”

  1. #1 |  Bob | 

    Ultimately, the Department of Justice cuts the local law enforcement agency a check for up to 80 percent of the property’s value, dodging Missouri’s requirement that the money must go to education.

    The word for that is “Money Laundering”, or perhaps “Fencing”.

  2. #2 |  Mattocracy | 

    I don’t remember learning about the Bill of Privileges in school. Peretz must have gone to a public school.

  3. #3 |  Marty | 

    there’s not many college-educated cops, because they grow tired of ‘is that how they told you to do it in class, COLLEGE BOY?!’

  4. #4 |  Mattocracy | 

    Not only is The onion more accurate that real news, it’s more accurate than ESPN! Their summation of the Falcons is desparingly dead on.

  5. #5 |  Bob | 

    Heh.

    …and in the news tonight, the entire Federal Government was indicted on RICO charges stemming from an Asset Forfeiture scheme that was illegally fencing confiscated property for pennies on the dollar…

  6. #6 |  John Jenkins | 

    Any definition of “use of force” that includes “verbally threatening suspects” is itself suspect. I’d like to see the percentages recalculated to remove that aspect from the definition, to see how it changes things.

  7. #7 |  Dave W. | 

    Would love to see use of force correlated with whether or not the popo served in the military in Iraq or Afghanistan.

  8. #8 |  JS | 

    Marty “there’s not many college-educated cops, because they grow tired of ‘is that how they told you to do it in class, COLLEGE BOY?!’”

    Exactly! A culture that scorns and denigrates education.

  9. #9 |  omar | 

    That Peretz article was awful. Poorly written, rambling, unfocused. What the hell is he talking about?

  10. #10 |  Yizmo Gizmo | 

    The crusading journalist on CNN, Amber whatever, keeps saying Craigslist
    adult ads promote “Child sex trafficking.”
    First, I have never seen a website with so many disclaimers
    aimed to prevent this from happening. Even on the platonic dating ads.
    Second, same old story, regulating these businesses keeps minors out.
    Give the sex workers cards and STD tests like
    Brazil or Costa Rica or Argentina and other places
    I have met these workers (in my research) and you will
    help drive out the pimps and abusers.
    It’s that simple.
    Why don’t the AGs and other sex police just say they think prostitution is icky-poo and stop relying upon the “trafficking” red herring?
    Are Americans really buying that line?

  11. #11 |  Two--Four | 

    [...] [...]

  12. #12 |  Nick T | 

    I think the Craiglist piece is kinda weak given the arguments at her disposal and her obvious knowledge and credibility.

    The best argument she only barely touches on is that craiglist is helpful because it means that people looking for sex – the customer – don’t have to rely on shady, actual criminals to connect them to an underground world and/or thereby contribute to these completely unaccountable criminals. Essentially: why use a pimp if you can just find an “escort” online?

    Inching closer to an open and free market, cuts into the profits of the black market, and harms those who would otherwise have financial incentives to traffic, enslave and exploit.

  13. #13 |  A McGillican | 

    Ah yes, I forgot the Founding Fathers intended to call it the “Bill of Privileges” not the “Bill of Rights”

  14. #14 |  Chuchundra | 

    The media crusade against Craigslist has nothing to do with sex trafficking or prostitution and everything to do with the fact that CL has cost the large media conglomerates billions upon billions of dollars in lost revenue from classified ads.

  15. #15 |  Privileges? « Oh, My! | 

    [...] (via Balko) [...]

  16. #16 |  Aaron | 

    John Jenkins: when someone other than a police officer threatens someone, in common law, it’s called “assault”. While it’s a tedious question of definitions, assault convictions usually do count as violence under most legal definitions. I really can see why verbal threats could count as use of force.

  17. #17 |  qwints | 

    Peretz’s article didn’t seem very seirious since it clearly lacked copy editing. It does, however, skirt by a serious point that those who seek to supress speech should be condemned for doing so (e.g. those Muslims who rioted in response to the Danish cartoons or those who sought to condment Salman Rushdie to death). Many of those who have done the most to limit or destroy free speech in recent years have been Muslim.

  18. #18 |  Rhayader | 

    How censoring Craigslist’s “adult services” section helps sex traffickers.

    I just had to send that one to my girlfriend, didn’t I? Here are some quotes from the IM conversation that just took place:

    “prostitution is abusive; it’s women consenting to abuse”

    “demeaning themselves and their sexuality to perform sex acts on a segment of society that is probably on average more abusive and deranged than most other people”

    “well really, many of these women could have been abused as children/young women and thus have really fucked up sense of self”

    Also, the term “male-centric” was used to describe my outlook. Thanks a lot Radley, this is going to be a fun fight after work tonight.

  19. #19 |  Charlie Potts | 

    “Peace Officers” in my neck of the woods make well over 100k, and have insanely great pensions. Why not make a college degree mandatory for the job? I’m sure there would be no shortage of applicants.

  20. #20 |  Pete S | 

    Remeber a few years back when a police department refused to hire a guy because he tested too high on his IQ test….. I wonder if there is a connection ……

  21. #21 |  Dave Krueger | 

    How censoring Craigslist’s “adult services” section helps sex traffickers.

    She talks about “transparency” a lot, but doesn’t suggest the one thing that would bring the most transparency to selling sex. That, of course, is legalization. Keeping prostitution illegal delivers prostitutes right in the eager hands of the sleazy criminal underworld which makes those who oppose legalization accomplices to the abuse.

    Her answer is not legalization but assigning more resources to law enforcement and her reason for keeping Craig’s List adult section open is because it helps law enforcement find the bad guys (which, to cops, includes prostitutes).

    Sorry, but I don’t find her argument much better than those who campaigned to close the adult section of Craig’s List in the first place.

  22. #22 |  John Jenkins | 

    @Aaron: So what? First, common law crimes have been mostly abolished in this country and replaced by statutory definitions of crimes (and assault only encompassed placing someone in immediate apprehension of harm, in any event; all threats would not qualify). Also, I really don’t need a legal history lesson :-)

    Second, by separating out threats of force from actual force, we would gain additional insight. I suspect that the percentage differences would widen (that is, college-educated officers are more likely to use threats than actual violence), but it would be interesting to see whether that is true. Bluntly, I don’t care about the legal definition in this context because I think the way they parsed the data may have concealed something interesting.

  23. #23 |  Yizmo Gizmo | 

    “prostitution is abusive; it’s women consenting to abuse”

    “demeaning themselves and their sexuality to perform sex acts on a segment of society that is probably on average more abusive and deranged than most other people”
    ——-
    In Argentina they turned it into a women’s rights issue
    and marched in the streets. “Keeps your laws out of our lives and careers, you pigs!
    We’re confident , free and happy doing this for a living.”
    What’s a less abusive job, I wonder, making 12 dollars an hour writing documents and pouring coffee for some smug, uptight prick?

  24. #24 |  Michael Chaney | 

    Actually, the 1st Amendment is a list of restrictions on government. To the author of the amendment, that the people had the right to free speech was not even questioned.

  25. #25 |  Shea Levy | 

    John Jenkins:

    If someone held a gun up to you and said “give me your wallet!”, would you not consider him to be using force against you until he ripped it out of your pocket or shot you? The fact is, when a cop tells you “you must do X” while in the commission of his duties, he means “you must do X, or I will force you to do X/imprison you/shoot you.” How is that meaningfully different from actually carrying through on the threat?

  26. #26 |  Rhayader | 

    @Michael: Yeah, it’s amazing how many people just can’t grasp the whole “Congress shall make no law” thing. The first amendment doesn’t “grant” jack shit, it protects natural rights from government interference. Actually that was the idea behind the entire Bill of Rights.

  27. #27 |  Raven | 

    I don’t usually comment, but the article about cops with better education resorting to force less often rings pretty true to me. My mom is a recently retired cop who had a college degree, and she was not at all inclined to use force. I think it also helped that she became a cop in her early 40’s instead of her early 20’s. Maturity is always a good thing when you’re putting that much power in somebody’s hands.

  28. #28 |  Chuchundra | 

    Rhayader, my beloved is a big-time feminist and my best advice for you is to try not to provoke these kinds of arguments. They rarely end well.

    Unless you’re the kind of couple that considers this sort of thing to be foreplay. In which case, carry on.

  29. #29 |  C. S. P. Schofield | 

    The problem with Muslim nutjobs is not what they say; the First Amendment should not be an issue. If we enforced the existing laws against funding terrorist groups, brutalizing women, and damaging property (something we should do to ALL protest-twits) the really dangerous Islamic radicals could then say whatever they wanted to… from their jail cells.

    The followers of Islam have an absolute right to be treated equally under the law. They should, therefore, be given the same respect and deference we accord to the KKK.

  30. #30 |  Sam | 

    CSP,

    Sorry, are you talking about “Muslim nutjobs” or just the “followers of Islam” generally? Because that’s two different groups you’re discussing.

  31. #31 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    So, if I have this right after listening to Fox all day and reading Peretz…

    Over 5,600 dead US soldiers* to give Muslims a better life** in Iraq/Afghanistan, who evidently are all the enemy/devil/terrorists as they worship their heathen faith.

    *Not to mention a couple hundred thousand civilians
    ** At least this was one of several official objectives

  32. #32 |  tb | 

    It does, however, skirt by a serious point that those who seek to supress speech should be condemned for doing so (e.g. those Muslims who rioted in response to the Danish cartoons or those who sought to condment Salman Rushdie to death). Many of those who have done the most to limit or destroy free speech in recent years have been Muslim.

    Protesting content is not the same as protesting the right to speak.

  33. #33 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    “prostitution is abusive”

    Well, it certainly is abusive if it is only allowed as a part of the criminal underworld. It’d be interesting to see how quickly a sex-workers union cleaned up the business in a country where prositution is legal*.

    Let’s not forget that “abusive” shouldn’t default to “illegal”. Taxation is abusive. But, I like the services I get from prostitution much better than what I get from taxation.

    *I mean REALLY legal and not just “legal” where the Feds still raid you at gunpoint or regulate you so much as to still justify a blackmarket.

  34. #34 |  Rhayader | 

    @Chuchundra: Yeah, you’d think I’d have learned my lesson after the umpteenth argument about drug prohibition, but apparently not.

    And no, it’s not foreplay, although your ideas are intriguing to me and I wish to subscribe to your newsletter.

  35. #35 |  John Jenkins | 

    That’s a perfect illustration of my point, actually. If a police officer’s every direction is backed by the potential use of force, then any demarcation is impossible because every encounter with an officer involves the use of force. IS the difference overt threat of force? How much of a threat qualifies? Put your hands where I can see them [or else I might shoot you]. Is that use of force? I don’t know. That’s why I’d like to see the data separated out so I can see the difference.

  36. #36 |  ClubMedSux | 

    Also, the term “male-centric” was used to describe my outlook. Thanks a lot Radley, this is going to be a fun fight after work tonight.

    Rhayader, my beloved is a big-time feminist and my best advice for you is to try not to provoke these kinds of arguments.

    Thanks for reminding me how awesome my wife is. She’s the one who introduced me to the Agitator.

  37. #37 |  Cynical in CA | 

    “Marty Peretz, editor of The New Republic, says the First Amendment is a privilege…”

    You’re just upset because Peretz speaks the truth, and he might just get himself in trouble with the establishment because of said truth-telling.

    Of course the Bill of Rights lists privileges. The State can do whatever it can get away with, whatever its agents are willing to justify. Who’s going to stop them?

    Is not a major portion of this blog devoted to daily transgressions against the U.S. Constitution by State agents?

    “None are more hopelessly enslaved than those who falsely believe they are free.” J.W. Von Goethe

    Mr. Peretz gives a healthy dose of reality, most probably unintentional and oblivious, but reality nonetheless.

  38. #38 |  Cynical in CA | 

    Yay!!! A college-educated cop is less likely to shoot my brains out than a GED cop. I feel SO much better.

    Newsflash — any police officer is force “a priori.”

    A police officer merely existing, not even acting, is force. The potential to act with force counts as force — that’s logical enough.

    But even before that, police officers are paid with tax (read: stolen) money. That money has to be taken by force.

    There is no meaningful way to differentiate between qualities of force regarding police officers. To treat actual physical violence as the only force worthy of consideration is to not see the forest for the trees.

    It’s the kinder, gentler machine-gun hand of which Neil Young sang.

    It is ALL violence.

  39. #39 |  qwints | 

    To clarify, Muslims, like everyone else, have a natural right to free speech which Congress is constitutionally from making a law to restrict. They are aboslutely free to claim (and I’ve got no problem with them claiming) that there is no God but Allah, that dogs are unclean or that making a visual depiction of Mohammed is offensive. I even believe that, in most cases, respecting the sensitivities of others is a great idea if it’s not a big deal. I do my best to avoid pointless offense by avoiding certain langauge most of the time.

    That doesn’t change the fact that there are countless examples of certain Muslims using violence and intimidation to try and silence those they disagree with. Only a very small minority may actually commit violence and many Muslims have condemned such efforts, but few would argue that criticism of Islam is risky.

  40. #40 |  J sub D | 

    But, frankly, Muslim life is cheap, most notably to Muslims. And among those Muslims led by the Imam Rauf there is hardly one who has raised a fuss about the routine and random bloodshed that defines their brotherhood. So, yes, I wonder whether I need honor these people and pretend that they are worthy of the privileges of the First Amendment which I have in my gut the sense that they will abuse.

    As bad as you just did?*
    I don’t know why I ever thought the left was better on civil liberties than the right as they are equally atrocious.

    * Just put a string of obscenities, profanities, and vitriolic denunciations of Marty Peretz’s humanity, decency, ancestry, sexual proclivities and DNA makeup here.

  41. #41 |  Aresen | 

    | Pete S | September 7th, 2010 at 12:53 pm
    Remeber a few years back when a police department refused to hire a guy because he tested too high on his IQ test….

    Over 80?

  42. #42 |  Kristen | 

    I used to (indirectly) work for Peretz. Maybe it’s a good thing the company went belly up…hope he lost a shitload of VC cash.

  43. #43 |  nathan | 

    So very sad that the ones who use less force are the ones who use it a mere 56% of the time…

  44. #44 |  InMD | 

    As a lifelong Washington Redskins fan I could only laugh at the awesome post on the Cowgirls and cry at the horrendously accurate portrait of the Skins.

  45. #45 |  Gerald A | 

    Eapen Thampy on Missouri’s asset forfeiture laws.

    How about they just tax the PD’s 100% of any assest forfeiture money.

  46. #46 |  John Jenkins | 

    InMD, the average zombie movie is a an accurate reproduction of the Redskins since 1992.

  47. #47 |  TC | 

    Every now and again a study come out and surprises us, This one should be of NO surprise at all.

    But some will be anyway.

    Always remember, Uniform, badge, gun = instant HERO status!

    Ok 4 yr degree required and they should be no younger than say 38!

    Mostly they should only watch Andy Griffith reruns for REAL training!

  48. #48 |  SagatAdon | 

    I think people who are more educated in general are more polite and reasonable. It’s just surprising when people find out that this truism applies to cops too. Especially since people think most cops are drunk on power anyway: http://lawblog.legalmatch.com/2010/07/21/farewell-cool-cops-hello-too-much-police-power/

  49. #49 |  Michael Chaney | 

    Protesting content is not the same as protesting the right to speak

    Muslim protests are usually protesting the latter, not the former, and calling for someone’s death is pretty much the ultimate form of protesting the right to speak.

    You might not be aware, but multiple people died in Pakistan in various incidents that were cited as a response to the Danish cartoons. It’s strange that people try to equate such violence to a simple protestation of the content.

  50. #50 |  Leon Wolfeson | 

    The problem in Missouri has a simple answer, if lawmakers have the guts. Simply, for every dollar seized which doesn’t go to schools as the law requires, a dollar is removed from the policing budget and added to the schools budget. i.e. One way or another.

    Won’t happen, of course.

  51. #51 |  Chad Olsen | 

    Now “they want Craigslist to be “a model for good policy” and officially get rid of its adult services section globally.”

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/09/08/craigslist-urged-to-kill-_n_708678.html

    Apparently giving them what they want in the states wasn’t good enough.

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