Late Morning Links

Friday, June 25th, 2010

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66 Responses to “Late Morning Links”

  1. #1 |  Athena | 

    “Not everyone is born omniscient about the proper way to cook a steak.”

    Certainly not. But I’d hope most people would take the couple minutes it takes to learn how to do it properly before ruining a piece of meat that may run $10+ a pound. Or, at the very least, bother to find out what they did wrong the first time they ruined one. But to go through life believing more than one or two of the myths listed in the article is pretty inexcusable. =P

    It’s okay, BSK – I’m a bit of a food snob myself, especially when it comes to steak. I’m a charcoal griller, so I don’t use the olive oil (I presume your preference for cast-iron necessitates that addition?), and I do leave my steaks out for a while prior to cooking and shall continue to do so, despite what the article suggests. In my experience, it presents a better environment for introducing the salt and pepper. Putting salt and pepper on a cold steak means I’m probably going to lose a fair amount of it when I plop the steak on the grill.

    I remember, when I was approximately 22, the first time I witnessed someone try to eat ketchup with their steak. I understand that not everyone is a steak purist like myself, so I always offer steak sauce and horseradish to my guests. But this guest, a friend of a friend, went into my fridge and grabbed ketchup. I was horrified. Almost without thinking, I grabbed his plate and slid the steak onto a clean one, handing it back to the blinking, confused young man. I explained that he had options, but ketchup just wasn’t one of them. Looking back, it was one of my more self-righteous moments, but he took it well and actually thanked me for breaking him of what turned out to be a painfully misguided family tradition. The poor guy had never had horseradish before, and ended up enjoying it quite thoroughly.

  2. #2 |  JS | 

    Athena ” I explained that he had options, but ketchup just wasn’t one of them.”

    hahaha…you did him a favor in the long run.

  3. #3 |  croaker | 

    There could be some positives to this hate crime thing.

    The way I see it, there are lots of cops on YouTube committing hate crimes…

  4. #4 |  Jeff | 

    Certainly not. But I’d hope most people would take the couple minutes it takes to learn how to do it properly before ruining a piece of meat that may run $10+ a pound. Or, at the very least, bother to find out what they did wrong the first time they ruined one. But to go through life believing more than one or two of the myths listed in the article is pretty inexcusable. =P

    Not everyone is omniscient about who has the best advice about cooking a steak either. It’s only a slight exaggeration to say the number of contradictory cooking tips I’ve received is greater than the number of steaks I’ve eaten. Hell, even in these comments you have people saying the article is wrong about this and that.

  5. #5 |  scott | 

    More afternoon threadjacking linkage:

    TSA molests amputee mother and her 4-year old son.

    http://amputeemommy.blogspot.com/2010/05/humiliation-and-now-im-angry.html

  6. #6 |  damaged justice | 

    Two words: Dry aging.

  7. #7 |  BSK | 

    I stand by grass-fed beef, with the caveat that getting it from a locally based farm (as I do) leads to some inconsistency with the beef. Free-range, grass-fed animals on small farms can’t guarantee the same consistent quality that big farms can, primarily because there will be more variation from animal to animal. Any well-run farm will acknowledge this. It’s why they general tag each animal so if there is one giving less-than-ideal flavor they can note it somehow.

    But comparing the best grass-fed, free-range, locally raised steak to the best corn-fed steak from a butcher (both dry aged, of course), the grass-fed was far superior. That was just my take though. It was slightly gamier and tastier overall, though I realize not everyone wants that from a steak.

    I realize this is a matter of opinion and not a hard fact (such as dry age being better than ‘wet age’ is simply objective truth), but it’s my preference. There is a lot tied up in the “green movement” and other such things but, in my experience, the beef I got at my local farm trumped everything out. I did get ONE bad steak, but it was still better than most super market steaks (only Whole Foods trumped it). So, the idea that grass-fed is all nonsense is also a bit of nonsense itself.

  8. #8 |  Booker | 

    Am I the only one who is concerned about the stop and frisk story? Nowhere does it mention that NYPD will stop performing stop and frisks. The bill as written stops them from compiling a database. Seems to me the net result is that there will be even less accountability – nowhere to go for accurate data…

    Call me cynical, but I don’t see anything at all in there about stopping the searches.

  9. #9 |  Juice | 

    Myth: The best way to cook a steak is on the grill.

    Fact (Opinion): The best way to cook a steak is to sear it in a pan on the stove and then place the pan in the oven to broil to temperature.

  10. #10 |  BSK | 

    Juice-

    Agreed, but one often needs equipment that not every cook has. Cast iron is a must, plus an oven that gets hot enough. A lot of ovens can’t hold the temperature necessary to make this method work, especially electric (I’ve NEVER found one that can) or older/cheaper gas ones (iffy results). But, yea, this is ideal, unless someone really likes a char.

  11. #11 |  LivingPre911Still | 

    We used to keep a hereford steer at the family farm each fall to fatten on corn for 8 weeks, it was taken off to slaughter and dry aged. Even the toughest cuts were unbelievably flavorfull and tender, the marbling was something you simply cannot find in any market.

    Brahma type of cattle are the browsers and grass eating variety as they can successfully digest food that the angus type of cattle cannot. The brahma types also grow faster. Brahma type breeds are found in Africa because they can group together to fight off large predators while the Angus here are so docile, the coyotes get them and the farmers resort to mules and other animals to fend off the coyotes in angus herds. For whatever the hell that’s worth.

    A friend of mines parents have a small farm in the Virginia mountains where they basicly just get a few lambs each year to let loose on their property and sell each year direct to consumers as “Free Range” and charge a premium. A steak is one thing but Lamb.. now that’s where it’s at. I incorporate lamb fat into aged venison each year in the grinder for burger.

  12. #12 |  Juice | 

    Ah! I’ve got a gas oven and use a large iron skillet. I guess I just took that for granted.

    BTW, I’m not saying that grilled steak isn’t awesome. I actually worked in a steak place for a while and we had a huge grill for all the meat. Freaking awesome steaks.

    But when I do it my way, quickly searing it then finishing it in the oven, then slathering it with butter, then letting it rest. Damn, now that’s a fine steak.

  13. #13 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    “Though the grandson said, “Don’t Taze my granny!” an El Reno police officer told another cop to “Taser her!” and wrote in his police report that he did so because the old woman “took a more aggressive posture in her bed,” according to the complaint. ”

    Is this a real story, #13?

  14. #14 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    Grass-fed is the way to go. A lot of the “corn-fed” used to just be finished off with corn before slaughter, so I have to say you might not be getting what you think you’re getting. But this might have changed in the last 10 years.

    You kinda have to sear first to ensure you cook the steak to order.

    Dry-aged? Yes. And Lamborghini makes a nice car. For the rest of us not able to drop $200 on steaks to feed the party we’re grilling for, there are other options to get a great steak for less $$.

    Salt helps bring out some protein rich liquids that brown and crust up nicely. I salt and leave out for 30 minutes prior to cooking. Pepper can burn at the high temps for steak, so I don’t cook with it.

    Finish with a drizzle of olive oil and cracked pepper after removing from the heat. Olive oil breaks down at high heat into some bad things, so use after cooking.

  15. #15 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    I incorporate lamb fat into aged venison each year in the grinder for burger.

    That is a good burger. A great steak is easier than a great burger. There’s an infinite mix of meats to grind for a great burger and you can incorporate different smokes into the cooking. Plus, when you’re done some jackass will just consider it a burger.

    Steak is easy (IMO).

  16. #16 |  BSK | 

    Boyd-

    Good suggestions. Dry-aged can be pricey (Whole Foods runs around $25/pound). BUT, I’ve found that visiting local farms (I found some in MD using eatwild.com) can really save money. I got the best steaks I’ve ever cooked myself for under $20/pound. Still a bit pricey, I suppose, but considering the vastly increased quality, I still think dry-aged is worth the price. I just eat steak less often as a result, but am willing to make that sacrifice.