Late Morning Links

Friday, June 25th, 2010
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66 Responses to “Late Morning Links”

  1. #1 |  Eric Hanneken | 

    I’ve often felt like doing the same thing.

    You have? I’m never inviting you into my living room.

  2. #2 |  Mario | 

    Regarding the NYPD’s stop-and-frisk, here’s the quote from the NYACLU:

    “We applaud the Senate for voting to pull the plug on the NYPD’s vast database of totally innocent black and Latino New Yorkers,” NYCLU Executive Director Donna Lieberman said.

    I understand that mainly minorities were targeted, but am I cranky for thinking the statement should have been worded “totally innocent New Yorkers, many of whom were black and Latino”?

    The NYCLU is there for all of us, right?

  3. #3 |  djm | 

    So when LEOs target a person based on a perception of a group (stop and search, Arizona immigration, etc.), it’s SOP.

    When criminals do it, it’s a hate crime.

    Just so we’re clear.

  4. #4 |  Mattocracy | 

    Hate crime for targeting the elderly? I don’t know I how I feel about this. Would these fraudsters be more noble for cheating middle aged people?

  5. #5 |  BSK | 

    Re: Steak Myths

    Did anyone not already know all those things? If you didn’t, just keep grilling your Grade C super market bulk meat special and be done with it.

  6. #6 |  djm | 

    One more time:

    Black guy driving a porsche?

    Criminal thinks: Carjack opportunity

    Cop thinks: Asset forfeiture opportunity

    See the difference?

  7. #7 |  MDGuy | 

    DJM

    The difference is that there’s a strong possibility that the criminal will shoot the guy. Wait, that can’t be it…no real difference there.

    Oh I know! The cop is the only one of the two that will haul the guy off to jail for “possession of currency that could possibly be used to buy crack” after taking his car.

  8. #8 |  Karl | 

    BSK: I consider myself relatively accomplished as a steak griller
    and I’m guilty of believing Myth 2. The rest, no way. But I’ve always
    left the steaks out for 30 minutes prior to seasoning and grilling.
    I’ll stop doing that and see what difference it makes.
    -Karl

  9. #9 |  Kristen | 

    Not all of those steak myths are accurate, as many commentors over there pointed out.

    Got a question about grilling steak? I’d go to Alton Brown first.

  10. #10 |  Chris Mallory | 

    “Without a hate crime, theft of less than $1 million carries no mandatory prison time; with it, the thief must serve for a year and may face 25.”

    This might be part of the problem.

  11. #11 |  ClubMedSux | 

    To sear or not to sear… THAT is the question. Personally, I think that searing first just dries things out, but you’ve got supposed experts on both sides of the fence so it would be nice if somebody could settle the debate once and for all.

  12. #12 |  Mario | 

    “Hey you kids, get off my lawn!” is now a hate crime.

  13. #13 |  Sinchy | 

    Granny Tase

    http://www.courthousenews.com/2010/06/24/28330.htm

  14. #14 |  Jeff | 

    On the elderly hate crime thing:

    Without a hate crime, theft of less than $1 million carries no mandatory prison time; with it, the thief must serve for a year and may face 25.

    So I don’t think it’s a clear case of “Castrate them for using the law for something other than was intended!” The motivation is understandable, though I wonder if it’s a good thing not to have minimum mandatory jail times.

  15. #15 |  Mark R. | 

    @2

    It’s like 95% miniority though. White people were the rounding error of this policy.

  16. #16 |  Mark R. | 

    “Did anyone not already know all those things? If you didn’t, just keep grilling your Grade C super market bulk meat special and be done with it.”

    Not everyone is born omniscient about the proper way to cook a steak.

  17. #17 |  JS | 

    Kristin “Got a question about grilling steak? I’d go to Alton Brown first.”

    definitely! that dude is like a food scientist.

  18. #18 |  Nipplemancer | 

    Using hate crimes statutes to go after grifters is a clear case of mission creep. The statutes by themselves are heinous, prosecute the crimes committed not the thoughts behind them.
    Up next is hate crime charges for rapists, because they obviously hate women and bank-robbers because they hate bankers!

  19. #19 |  LivingPre911Still | 

    Ask the butcher to cut the porterhouse or ribeye 3″ thick, yes 3″ thick! Marinate in 2 parts worcestershire 1 part lemon juice and add a bit of brown sugar, black pepper… marinate for 12- 48 hours. Coat with black pepper and sprinkling of salt before placing it on the grill. Sear steak 4-5 min. each side on a very hot grill… finish it off in the oven at 275 degrees… 30 min. for ribeye or 40 min. for porterhouse (medium rare)… take it out of the oven and coat with a ginger salad dressing… let the steak rest for 15 min. before serving… Best piece of meat you will ever eat….

  20. #20 |  Aresen | 

    BSK | June 25th, 2010 at 11:48 am
    Re: Steak Myths

    Did anyone not already know all those things? If you didn’t, just keep grilling your Grade C super market bulk meat special and be done with it.

    *Raises hand, embarrassed.* I got only 4 out of seven right.

  21. #21 |  Aresen | 

    U.S. debt rose by $1.7 billion over course of Isner-Mahut marathon Wimbledon match.

    Shit, that’s nothing.

    It goes up by that much every time Obama opens his mouth.

  22. #22 |  J sub D | 

    Mortgage fraudsters prosecuted for “hate crimes.”

    For Ms. Kane, there is no debate. “We don’t have a whole lot of tools,” she said. “We should utilize what the legislature has given us.”

    To which I respond “Bovine excrement”. What legal world does Ms. Kane inhabit? This is the same sort of prosecutorial overreach as charging people pissing in alleys with a “sex crime”.

    Is rolling drunks (addiction is a recogniozed disability) next on the list?

  23. #23 |  Mattocracy | 

    A hate crime is hate a crime when the victim is chosen because of the “hate” the criminal has towards said victim.

    I doubt these mortgate fraud fucks picked on the elderly because they hate old people. They singled them out because the odds of criminal success were the best with older victims. They aren’t hateful, just opportunistic, much like vultures. Compare that to cats, who will cough up a hairball on your favorite shirt out of spite. Something much closer to an actual hate crime.

  24. #24 |  Fred | 

    If you want to know about grilling a steak
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7KrjeJDNKUA
    No it’s not BBQ damn it

  25. #25 |  Nando | 

    The myth is about not bringing a steak to room temperature before cooking is not a myth. Not only does it have to do with making the denaturing of the meat easier (i.e. the meat proteins begin to uncoil), but the meat travels less of a distance on the temperature scale.

    Imagine two steaks that start cooking at 58F and 33F, respectively, and reach an internal temp of 135F. The first steak didn’t have to travel as much on the temperature scale, while the second one had an extra 25 degrees to travel (and it does it relatively quickly). When both steaks are allowed to rest, the second steak will be juicier as the juices don’t get pushed into the meat as much and, thus, don’t tend to overcorrect when removed from the heat (the reason meat is allowed to rest is so juices redistribute. If the meat starts at a warmer temp, the juices won’t travel as far inward and then outward of the steak).

    I don’t have time to look up the link, but Kenji Lopez-Alt did a test on the Serious Eats Food Lab website and compared both, side by side. The meat that was allowed to come to room temperature was judged the best.

    Also, meat can safely sit out at room temperature for about 2 hours, according to the FDA. So, leaving it on your counter for 45 minutes to come to temperature won’t cause a bacteria breeding ground, as suggested in the article.

  26. #26 |  bobzbob | 

    What?! You can steal $1million from an elderly person and NOT FACE JAIL TIME? WTF!

  27. #27 |  Kristen | 

    Searing isn’t about sealing in juices, it’s about the Maillard reaction, which means making a nice, brown crust with concentrated beefy flavor. If you don’t like a flavorful crust on your steak, then by all means, don’t sear.

  28. #28 |  Nando | 

    Allow me to correct myself, since there is no edit button

    The myth is about not bringing a steak to room temperature before cooking is not a myth. Not only does it have to do with making the denaturing of the meat easier (i.e. the meat proteins begin to uncoil), but the meat travels less of a distance on the temperature scale.

    Imagine two steaks that start cooking at 58F and 33F, respectively, and reach an internal temp of 135F. The first steak didn’t have to travel as much on the temperature scale, while the second one had an extra 25 degrees to travel (and it does it relatively quickly). When both steaks are allowed to rest, the **FIRST** steak will be juicier as the juices don’t get pushed into the meat as much and, thus, don’t tend to overcorrect when removed from the heat (the reason meat is allowed to rest is so juices redistribute. If the meat starts at a warmer temp, the juices won’t travel as far inward and then outward of the steak).

    I don’t have time to look up the link, but Kenji Lopez-Alt did a test on the Serious Eats Food Lab website and compared both, side by side. The meat that was allowed to come to room temperature was judged the best.

    Also, meat can safely sit out at room temperature for about 2 hours, according to the FDA. So, leaving it on your counter for 45 minutes to come to temperature won’t cause a bacteria breeding ground, as suggested in the article.

  29. #29 |  KBCraig | 

    The steak page isn’t even consistent within itself. It advocates turning only once, while at the same time saying you need two zones: one to sear, one to finish.

    Letting meat warm up a bit might not be necessary, but it’s not a “disaster”, either. Also contrary to their advice, giving a mediocre cut a thorough coating (and I mean completely covering it) in coarse salt while letting it come up to room temperature (about 45 minutes) doesn’t leave it “soggy”, it tenderizes it very nicely. I’m pretty sure I learned that trick right here on the Agitator, and it works quite well.

  30. #30 |  Dave Krueger | 

    #8 Karl

    BSK: I consider myself relatively accomplished as a steak griller
    and I’m guilty of believing Myth 2. The rest, no way. But I’ve always
    left the steaks out for 30 minutes prior to seasoning and grilling.

    I’m a steak griller, but I’ve never left a steak out so it could come to room temp before throwing it on the grill, but there are probably people who could give a convincing reason for doing so. Warning against it sounds a lot more like food safety paranoia than anything having to do with how to properly grill a steak.

  31. #31 |  Let's Be Free | 

    See the following…are you feeling better and better about moving now?

    http://www.arlnow.com/2010/06/25/tense-moments-as-swat-team-deploys-in-north-arlington-neighborhood/#comments

  32. #32 |  Dave Krueger | 

    #27 Kristen

    Searing isn’t about sealing in juices, it’s about the Maillard reaction, which means making a nice, brown crust with concentrated beefy flavor. If you don’t like a flavorful crust on your steak, then by all means, don’t sear.

    I read an article somewhere about an experiment that measured whether juices were indeed sealed in by searing. I think they measured the weight of the steaks before and after cooking and determined that searing actually results in more weight loss during cooking which they equated to a loss of juices.

    My little stinkin’ gas grill (actually named the “Gas Grill for Pussies”) doesn’t get real hot, so it’s hard for me to quickly brown a steak. But, the seasoning I coat it with does make for a nice crusty outer texture which I’m quite proud of because I now make steaks better than anything I’ve had at a restaurant (at least in this area). Too bad I didn’t learn how to do it a few decades ago.

  33. #33 |  Ghost of Johnny Cash | 

    Radley,

    This story is up your alley:

    http://gawker.com/5572740/dont-taze-my-granny

    A man calls for medics and 10 cops show up and taze his granny?

    Horrible, but I can’t get a modified Johnny Cash line out of my head:

    “I tazed a granny in El Reno, just to watch her fry”

  34. #34 |  Dave Krueger | 

    #28 Nando

    Also, meat can safely sit out at room temperature for about 2 hours, according to the FDA. So, leaving it on your counter for 45 minutes to come to temperature won’t cause a bacteria breeding ground, as suggested in the article.

    While I believe the FDA is probably in the ballpark on that number, I prefer advice from a reputable organization.

  35. #35 |  Len | 

    Gandalf and Legolas have a more elegant solution to the vuvuzela:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LXt2KcUv7Yk

  36. #36 |  Dave Krueger | 

    U.S. debt rose by $1.7 billion over course of Isner-Mahut marathon Wimbledon match.

    From the article:

    “We contacted Buchanan’s office and an aide clarified that what they’d actually meant in the tweet was how much the debt had risen during the 11-hour, 5-minute match itself. (The match was suspended for darkness twice and there were delays on the third day to give extra rest time.)”

    Too bad the growth of the deficit wasn’t likewise suspended during the hours of darkness.

  37. #37 |  Someone Who Doesn't Want to Lose His Job | 

    #6 | djm | June 25th, 2010 at 11:53 am

    One more time:

    Black guy driving a porsche?

    Criminal thinks: Carjack opportunity

    Cop thinks: Asset forfeiture opportunity

    See the difference?

    Cop wears blue. Done.

  38. #38 |  Someone Who Doesn't Want to Lose His Job | 

    #1 | Eric Hanneken | June 25th, 2010 at 11:33 am

    I’ve often felt like doing the same thing.

    You have? I’m never inviting you into my living room.

    Sometimes the obvious jokes are only obvious because they’re the best.

  39. #39 |  ClubMedSux | 

    #27 | Kristen | June 25th, 2010 at 1:07 pm

    Searing isn’t about sealing in juices, it’s about the Maillard reaction, which means making a nice, brown crust with concentrated beefy flavor.

    Sorry, I left out an important word in my original comment. It’s not searing that I’m unsure about; it’s searing FIRST. Some say you sear first to lock in the juices; others say you sear last to avoid drying out the meat. Personally the second theory makes more sense to me.

  40. #40 |  Rich | 

    I love to grill and always let the steak get to room temperature before throwing it on. It produces (in my humble opinion) uniform cooking throughout. A cold steak will more often than not be cooked “well-done” for the first 1/4 inch and overly rare for the remainder.

  41. #41 |  Pinandpuller | 

    re Vuvuzela: So there really is a “brown note”.

    re hate crime: Last night on the news they showed some vandalism on signs at the entrance to a new subdivision in Middle Tennessee (racial slurs and a guy being hung). Apparently a black family has purchased a lot in this subdivision and if they go to the police station and file a complaint it will be categorized as a hate crime. The vacant lot they own might be a half a mile from the entrance and they certainly incurred no damages from the vandalism.

    Question: do cops who tase, beat and shoot minorities get enhanced paid leave?

  42. #42 |  BSK | 

    I’m being a bit of a food snob. I apologize.

  43. #43 |  Ghost of Johnny Cash | 

    Um, yeah- tasered bedridden grandmother?

  44. #44 |  BSK | 

    Searing does NOT seal in juices. As someone mentioned earlier, a test was done weighing steaks before and after, seared and unseared, and the unseared ones (as in, seared prior to cooking) were lighter, aka, they lost more weight to juice lost. Alton Brown did a thing on it and explained that searing damages the meat and any damage allows for juice lost.

    That being said, searing DOES play a role. It adds texture, flavor (if using a charcoal or wood burning grill), among other things. But the idea that searing a steak seals in juices the way cauterizing a wound seals in blood is just wrong.

    For my money, a dry-aged rip eye is the way to go. If grass fed, all the better. The better the steak, the less you need to do to it. Generally, a little olive oil, salt, and pepper is all a good steak should need. Any more and you end up tasting marinade and not meat. The meat should taste good on it’s own. Whole Foods is a solid bet for dry aged cuts if you don’t have a local butcher. Cast iron is the preferred way to cook, but you need a REALLY hot oven (electric won’t cut it; most gas will do). I use a probe thermometer to ensure proper cooking. I cook to about 125-degree and let it rest, bringing it up to the perfect temp for medium-rare. I’m just not handling meat enough to do the ‘touch test’ (insert double entendre joke here).

  45. #45 |  Duncan20903 | 

    I wonder how many people know that after having the stomach disconnected one can never again enjoy a steak. Rather cruel to stick a delicious food under the nose of such people. Well I guess we could puree it first, but somehow mashed steak doesn’t appeal to me.

  46. #46 |  Aresen | 

    BSK | June 25th, 2010 at 3:47 pm
    I’m being a bit of a food snob. I apologize.

    We’ll forgive you if you buy dinner and drinks for all of us.

  47. #47 |  Yizmo Gizmo | 

    “The whole system is decadent and it stopped being about creativity long ago, and became about productivity.”
    Jean Jacque Beineix (Diva, Betty Blue) interview I read today.
    Made me think of the American political/legal system, except maybe
    a couple word changes.

    The whole system is decadent and stopped being about justice long ago,
    and became about big money.

  48. #48 |  LivingPre911Still | 

    Grass fed… nope… that’s someone in the cattle industry selling you a bag of goods because it’s cheaper for them and the green wave buys into it… angus and herefords were bred for it… corn fed is definately where it’s at… but feed lot regulations really don’t allow for the really good grain fed cattle you used to be able to get…

  49. #49 |  ktc2 | 

    Charley’s Steakhouse in Orlando, Florida. Has fantastic steaks! The one on OBT still gives a free birthday dinner with purchase of one at the regular price (of course). The porterhouse is just amazing.

  50. #50 |  JS | 

    This totally sucks. The best I can do is make ramen noodles or maybe if I’m feeling daring, spaghetti.

  51. #51 |  Athena | 

    “Not everyone is born omniscient about the proper way to cook a steak.”

    Certainly not. But I’d hope most people would take the couple minutes it takes to learn how to do it properly before ruining a piece of meat that may run $10+ a pound. Or, at the very least, bother to find out what they did wrong the first time they ruined one. But to go through life believing more than one or two of the myths listed in the article is pretty inexcusable. =P

    It’s okay, BSK – I’m a bit of a food snob myself, especially when it comes to steak. I’m a charcoal griller, so I don’t use the olive oil (I presume your preference for cast-iron necessitates that addition?), and I do leave my steaks out for a while prior to cooking and shall continue to do so, despite what the article suggests. In my experience, it presents a better environment for introducing the salt and pepper. Putting salt and pepper on a cold steak means I’m probably going to lose a fair amount of it when I plop the steak on the grill.

    I remember, when I was approximately 22, the first time I witnessed someone try to eat ketchup with their steak. I understand that not everyone is a steak purist like myself, so I always offer steak sauce and horseradish to my guests. But this guest, a friend of a friend, went into my fridge and grabbed ketchup. I was horrified. Almost without thinking, I grabbed his plate and slid the steak onto a clean one, handing it back to the blinking, confused young man. I explained that he had options, but ketchup just wasn’t one of them. Looking back, it was one of my more self-righteous moments, but he took it well and actually thanked me for breaking him of what turned out to be a painfully misguided family tradition. The poor guy had never had horseradish before, and ended up enjoying it quite thoroughly.

  52. #52 |  JS | 

    Athena ” I explained that he had options, but ketchup just wasn’t one of them.”

    hahaha…you did him a favor in the long run.

  53. #53 |  croaker | 

    There could be some positives to this hate crime thing.

    The way I see it, there are lots of cops on YouTube committing hate crimes…

  54. #54 |  Jeff | 

    Certainly not. But I’d hope most people would take the couple minutes it takes to learn how to do it properly before ruining a piece of meat that may run $10+ a pound. Or, at the very least, bother to find out what they did wrong the first time they ruined one. But to go through life believing more than one or two of the myths listed in the article is pretty inexcusable. =P

    Not everyone is omniscient about who has the best advice about cooking a steak either. It’s only a slight exaggeration to say the number of contradictory cooking tips I’ve received is greater than the number of steaks I’ve eaten. Hell, even in these comments you have people saying the article is wrong about this and that.

  55. #55 |  scott | 

    More afternoon threadjacking linkage:

    TSA molests amputee mother and her 4-year old son.

    http://amputeemommy.blogspot.com/2010/05/humiliation-and-now-im-angry.html

  56. #56 |  damaged justice | 

    Two words: Dry aging.

  57. #57 |  BSK | 

    I stand by grass-fed beef, with the caveat that getting it from a locally based farm (as I do) leads to some inconsistency with the beef. Free-range, grass-fed animals on small farms can’t guarantee the same consistent quality that big farms can, primarily because there will be more variation from animal to animal. Any well-run farm will acknowledge this. It’s why they general tag each animal so if there is one giving less-than-ideal flavor they can note it somehow.

    But comparing the best grass-fed, free-range, locally raised steak to the best corn-fed steak from a butcher (both dry aged, of course), the grass-fed was far superior. That was just my take though. It was slightly gamier and tastier overall, though I realize not everyone wants that from a steak.

    I realize this is a matter of opinion and not a hard fact (such as dry age being better than ‘wet age’ is simply objective truth), but it’s my preference. There is a lot tied up in the “green movement” and other such things but, in my experience, the beef I got at my local farm trumped everything out. I did get ONE bad steak, but it was still better than most super market steaks (only Whole Foods trumped it). So, the idea that grass-fed is all nonsense is also a bit of nonsense itself.

  58. #58 |  Booker | 

    Am I the only one who is concerned about the stop and frisk story? Nowhere does it mention that NYPD will stop performing stop and frisks. The bill as written stops them from compiling a database. Seems to me the net result is that there will be even less accountability – nowhere to go for accurate data…

    Call me cynical, but I don’t see anything at all in there about stopping the searches.

  59. #59 |  Juice | 

    Myth: The best way to cook a steak is on the grill.

    Fact (Opinion): The best way to cook a steak is to sear it in a pan on the stove and then place the pan in the oven to broil to temperature.

  60. #60 |  BSK | 

    Juice-

    Agreed, but one often needs equipment that not every cook has. Cast iron is a must, plus an oven that gets hot enough. A lot of ovens can’t hold the temperature necessary to make this method work, especially electric (I’ve NEVER found one that can) or older/cheaper gas ones (iffy results). But, yea, this is ideal, unless someone really likes a char.

  61. #61 |  LivingPre911Still | 

    We used to keep a hereford steer at the family farm each fall to fatten on corn for 8 weeks, it was taken off to slaughter and dry aged. Even the toughest cuts were unbelievably flavorfull and tender, the marbling was something you simply cannot find in any market.

    Brahma type of cattle are the browsers and grass eating variety as they can successfully digest food that the angus type of cattle cannot. The brahma types also grow faster. Brahma type breeds are found in Africa because they can group together to fight off large predators while the Angus here are so docile, the coyotes get them and the farmers resort to mules and other animals to fend off the coyotes in angus herds. For whatever the hell that’s worth.

    A friend of mines parents have a small farm in the Virginia mountains where they basicly just get a few lambs each year to let loose on their property and sell each year direct to consumers as “Free Range” and charge a premium. A steak is one thing but Lamb.. now that’s where it’s at. I incorporate lamb fat into aged venison each year in the grinder for burger.

  62. #62 |  Juice | 

    Ah! I’ve got a gas oven and use a large iron skillet. I guess I just took that for granted.

    BTW, I’m not saying that grilled steak isn’t awesome. I actually worked in a steak place for a while and we had a huge grill for all the meat. Freaking awesome steaks.

    But when I do it my way, quickly searing it then finishing it in the oven, then slathering it with butter, then letting it rest. Damn, now that’s a fine steak.

  63. #63 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    “Though the grandson said, “Don’t Taze my granny!” an El Reno police officer told another cop to “Taser her!” and wrote in his police report that he did so because the old woman “took a more aggressive posture in her bed,” according to the complaint. ”

    Is this a real story, #13?

  64. #64 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    Grass-fed is the way to go. A lot of the “corn-fed” used to just be finished off with corn before slaughter, so I have to say you might not be getting what you think you’re getting. But this might have changed in the last 10 years.

    You kinda have to sear first to ensure you cook the steak to order.

    Dry-aged? Yes. And Lamborghini makes a nice car. For the rest of us not able to drop $200 on steaks to feed the party we’re grilling for, there are other options to get a great steak for less $$.

    Salt helps bring out some protein rich liquids that brown and crust up nicely. I salt and leave out for 30 minutes prior to cooking. Pepper can burn at the high temps for steak, so I don’t cook with it.

    Finish with a drizzle of olive oil and cracked pepper after removing from the heat. Olive oil breaks down at high heat into some bad things, so use after cooking.

  65. #65 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    I incorporate lamb fat into aged venison each year in the grinder for burger.

    That is a good burger. A great steak is easier than a great burger. There’s an infinite mix of meats to grind for a great burger and you can incorporate different smokes into the cooking. Plus, when you’re done some jackass will just consider it a burger.

    Steak is easy (IMO).

  66. #66 |  BSK | 

    Boyd-

    Good suggestions. Dry-aged can be pricey (Whole Foods runs around $25/pound). BUT, I’ve found that visiting local farms (I found some in MD using eatwild.com) can really save money. I got the best steaks I’ve ever cooked myself for under $20/pound. Still a bit pricey, I suppose, but considering the vastly increased quality, I still think dry-aged is worth the price. I just eat steak less often as a result, but am willing to make that sacrifice.

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