Morning Links

Thursday, May 27th, 2010
Digg it |  reddit |  del.icio.us |  Fark

44 Responses to “Morning Links”

  1. #1 |  Robert | 

    “Officials say the searches are voluntary and drivers can opt out if they want.”

    And still be allowed into the airport to fly? They don’t mention that. You can opt out of the screening process at the checkpoint also, but won’t be allowed to pass on through.

  2. #2 |  pegr | 

    So ATF cop complains that the cops aren’t fair? Well boo-effing-who! The bad cop is being picked on by bad cops! You made your bed with them, pal. You deal with it. I suggest getting a real job. Funny that the worst they did with him is let him keep his $150k job with no responsibilities. When the cops pick on a cop, they still treat him well.

    Remember kids: There is no such thing as a good cop. Good cops cover for bad cops. That makes them bad cops.

  3. #3 |  Dave Krueger | 

    Color me dubious.

    Don’t be so picky. Look at the bright side. They got a warrant for the right house after having gone to the wrong house in response to a call to another house for a different reason. They didn’t kill any dogs (although the article doesn’t say whether they searched the house looking for a dog to kill) and they didn’t kill any people (probably due to the unforeseen circumstance of there not being anyone around to kill). All in all, this is a successful police operation and everyone apparently followed standard departmental procedure (including going to the wrong house bore going to the right house).

  4. #4 |  Dave Krueger | 

    From the car inspection item:

    Officials say the searches are voluntary and drivers can opt out if they want.

    Of course, opting out will most likely be considered probable cause to search…

  5. #5 |  Tom G | 

    I’ve got a few questions about the latest puppycide, one of the most obvious being WHO authorized the cremation? I’m wondering if the owners have a case against the (vet ? pet funeral home? article is short) for doing the cremation without verifying with them, just on the word of the police.

  6. #6 |  Professor Coldheart | 

    re: the Puppycide link – why were the cops chasing a DUI suspect on a warrant for failure to appear with guns drawn? isn’t that kind of overkill? if it’d been a bench warrant for violating probation, would they have opened fire?

  7. #7 |  Charlie O | 

    Wah fucking Wah. Poor ATF agents. These guys are worthless loads on the taxpayer. Every investigation they have taken up against motorcycle clubs, after spending countless hours and dollars have always ended up with a pile of bullshit and minor charges. Read Billy Queen’s book. That fucker instigated most of the charges they came up with against the Mongols. The current case against the Pagans is falling apart. They’ve never successfully made a major case against the Hells Angels. These guys make shit up. And then fail miserably when they go to court. My favorite video is watching ATF officers getting shot off the roof at Waco. Yee ha.

  8. #8 |  Cynical in CA | 

    “Puppycide: Family says cops shot their dog while pursuing a DWI suspect, then had the dog cremated to cover up the shooting.”

    “For every thousand hacking at the branches, there is only one striking the root.” — Henry David Thoreau

    Dogs and cops do not mix. This is a brute fact. Puppycide will not go away until there is separation of dogs and cops, one way or the other.

    Most statists have the dimmest view possible of humanity, and I am inclined to agree with them. That’s why I advocate eliminating the asinine system of delegating self-defense to an unaccountable superagency of stone-cold killers, such as the subject of the above article.

  9. #9 |  Cynical in CA | 

    #5 | Tom G — ” I’m wondering if the owners have a case against the (vet ? pet funeral home? article is short) for doing the cremation without verifying with them, just on the word of the police.”

    Does dog ownership continue after the death of the dog? I ask this seriously. Is the dog property, or is the dog’s body property, or both? At any rate, if the police order you to do something, you have to do it, right? I mean, what good are police if you can disobey them?

    /sarcasm, but not too much

  10. #10 |  Cynical in CA | 

    OT, but encouraging, as Airstrip One is a practice facility for the U.S. Megastate these days:

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/eu_britain_identity_cards

  11. #11 |  Marty | 

    ‘Officials say the searches are voluntary and drivers can opt out if they want.’

    it’s voluntary NOW. it’ll be policy soon…

  12. #12 |  flukebucket | 

    #8 Cynical in CA

    Are you familiar with this site?

    Your quote made me think of it. It was one of the first websites I frequented when I first started messing around on the internet. Man, that was in the mid-90′s I believe.

    I still have one of their t-shirts :-)

  13. #13 |  Tom G | 

    #12 flukebucket – I have heard of that site but do not read it frequently. I probably should.
    #9 Cynical in CA – See, that’s one indication of how to know you’re living in a free society – the pet funeral home owner would NOT automatically jump to the bidding of LEOs concerning pets owned by a third party. Even a third party accused of a crime (which wasn’t the case here). Based on previous posts of yours, I suspect that you and I would agree on things nearly all the time. As far as ownership of the dog, I would take as first principle that IF dogs can be owned, the dog is wholly the property of its owner, and that carries beyond its death.

  14. #14 |  albatross | 

    Actually, the surprising thing about Billy Queen’s book was how light the ultimate sentences were for the guys who eventually went to jail, compared to how serious the crimes were. (This assumes he was telling the truth about what they did; I have no way of knowing one way or another.)

    The funniest part of the book involved his obviously bullshit descriptions of using sleight of hand tricks to avoid taking any drugs. (Let’s get this straight: you’re in a room full of guys who will kill you right now, without a bit of hesitation, if they suspect you’re a cop. You are doing drugs with them as a way of proving yourself. A hundred miles away, there is some rule written somewhere requiring that you not take drugs while undercover, and some supervisor of yours who isn’t watching. What do you do?) It seemed to me that he wrote the descriptions so that it was obvious, even to someone like me who knows nothing about drugs, motorcycle gangs, police work, etc., that these stories about sleight of hand were bullshit. (But who knows? I am as far from an expert on this stuff as you can imagine.)

  15. #15 |  albatross | 

    The ATF whistleblower story matters a great deal, because it describes a process by which an organization can become more and more unaccountable. If whistleblowers are openly punished, then fewer people will blow the whistle, and people who find what’s being done unacceptable will instead look for other work. Over time, that concentrates the people willing to overlook misbehavior in the ATF.

  16. #16 |  Tom G | 

    The ATF ought to be shut down/disbanded ASAP and all the personnel need to find (if they can) real productive work. Trying to protect the whistleblowers is fine and dandy but for what point? To prolong one of many useless agencies that simply helps suppress the free market and sucks up millions in tax money ?

  17. #17 |  Tom G | 

    This can’t be right, can it ? first hit on “atf budget 2009″ brings up
    http://www.justice.gov/jmd/2009summary/html/124_atf.htm

    total requested for 2009 is 1,027,814 – but there’s that note up above saying “Dollars in thousands”….so is the ATF really a BILLION dollar a year agency ? Wow.

  18. #18 |  flukebucket | 

    so is the ATF really a BILLION dollar a year agency ?

    I would expect it to be more than that. Hell a billion won’t get you 5 days in Iraq.

  19. #19 |  Cynical in CA | 

    #12 | flukebucket

    Right on, man! I was going to link to it to, but I have to watch the anarchist-overkill at this site. I feel I’m incubating enemies here, with the anti-anarchist sentiment rising visibly lately. I corresponded for a good while years ago with Polo Leyendecker, one of the benefactors of STR. He more than any other person guided me out of the fog of state indoctrination toward a more rational perspective. Glad you are aware of STR.

  20. #20 |  Cynical in CA | 

    #13 | Tom G — “I suspect that you and I would agree on things nearly all the time. As far as ownership of the dog, I would take as first principle that IF dogs can be owned, the dog is wholly the property of its owner, and that carries beyond its death.”

    Let’s keep the streak going — I agree completely, Tom. Great post about bellwethers, with kowtowing to law enforcement a very good indicator of the status of a society.

  21. #21 |  Bob | 

    Color me dubious

    This is one to watch and get more info on.

    What do you want to bet that the guy, Anthony Brandon Aguayo, had priors for drug related offenses and the cops just cooked up the ‘domestic disturbance’ call so they could go on a fishing expedition?

  22. #22 |  Robert | 

    Wasn’t there a recent supreme or state court decision that said evidence obtained from mistaken raids was OK to use, as long as the cops made the mistake in “good faith”? ( *snort*, *chuckle*, *cough* ) This would be the logical result of that.

  23. #23 |  Tom G | 

    Radley, new post at Slashdot…The Wash. Post reports that my (awful) Senator Chuck Schumer is co-sponsoring a bill to require identification to buy pre-paid cell phones, and for the info to be kept for 18 months after the expiration of the phone number:
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/05/26/AR2010052603693.html

    This is one of those easy indicators – if someone who doesn’t have a problem with the bill proposed, I can’t trust them to protect my freedoms (what’s left of them).

  24. #24 |  Michael Chaney | 

    I feel I’m incubating enemies here, with the anti-anarchist sentiment rising visibly lately,/blockquote>

    I feel for you, as you actually are an anarchist (from what you say). It’s unfortunate that the word “anarchist” is also used by extreme left-wing kooks – who are the very antithesis of anarchism – every time there’s a G8 summit or some other such event.

    As a Christian, I feel your pain every time Jim Dobson or Benny Hinn shows up on TV.

    But I don’t agree with the idea of actual anarchism, if for no other reason history has shown that people will always have a leader, and in the absence of a reasonable leader, the most unreasonable will usually take over. And, no, I don’t actually thing “the most unreasonable” statement describes America – it could be *a lot* worse.

  25. #25 |  Michael Chaney | 

    I love it when I screw up the ending blockquote…

  26. #26 |  MassHole | 

    To Kill a Mockingbird. One of my favorite books and movies. Rare that a movie can live up to a book.

  27. #27 |  Dan | 

    I am getting sick and tired of puppycide– for me its almost as disturbing as innocent people getting killed. On another note, I live in a small town in Wisconsin and over the last year there has been a signficant increase in police patrols. This is a village of slightly over a thousand people and I see cops drive by the house 2-3 times a day. In the past I’d see a patrol maybe once a month. I was just wondering if anyone else has noticed anything different with patrols in their own towns/cities.

  28. #28 |  Chris in AL | 

    “The actual domestic disturbance call didn’t amount to much, Jones said.”

    Yeah, imaginary events rarely do.

  29. #29 |  capo | 

    color me dubious…

    I love how they use the largest mass conversions they can come up with to make it sound scary…

    1000grams of Marijuana seized! OMG thats over 2 pounds!!

  30. #30 |  Cynical in CA | 

    Thanks for your sympathy Michael. Reasonable people can disagree, and that’s something to be thankful for. One thing you might consider, though, is whether a “benign” tyranny is superior to a truly malignant one. At least with the malignant one, the call to action is more urgent and immediate. With the benign one, it could conceivably last forever. I suppose most people are just fine with a benign tyranny, there’s the rub.

  31. #31 |  Scooby | 

    But Capo- that’s over 15,000 grains! or, to be completely ridiculous, it’s over 6×10^26 atomic mass units!

  32. #32 |  MacGregory | 

    Fuck the police by these means: do not talk to them, ask for a lawyer. Never say shit, they are not you friends, it is there job to gather evidence against you, be you innocent or guilty, they got the right guy and it’s you, regardless. You happen to be there when the fire started? Oh well, tough break nigger. Somebody has to go to jail for this. Might as well be you. Ah, hell I’m saving the county some time. You are probably guilty of some other crime or would have done something in the future. Crime prevention is my campaign slogan.
    Maybe the real perp can do it again, then I can get another mark on my six-shooter.

  33. #33 |  AJs | 

    Hey Radley, I know you are busy, but I would love to see you do a little digging in this story if you get a chance!

    Washington State drug agents seize marijuana legalization petitions

  34. #34 |  flight714 | 

    regarding the BATF story: blah blah blah put their life on the line blah blah blah everyday blah blah blah we don’t know all the facts blah blah blah piece of shit dissenters blah blah liberals blah blah needed to wiretap blah blah

    cut/copy paste.

  35. #35 |  Helmut O' Hooligan | 

    Cynical in California:
    Sorry to hear you feel the blog has become inhospitable. You and I have had some productive conversatiosn on the topic of anarchism vs. limited government.

    One thing I feel compelled to mention to you before I go is that I have basically decided to stop looking at public sector law enforcement jobs at this point. The Agitator and other news sources have led me to the decision that the system is broken and I simply would not fit in. I am not an anarchist, but I have principles that I believe would be compromised if I opted to continue looking at LEO jobs. I will be more open-minded about the private sector from this point on.

    Would you recommend any books that have influenced your views on how “policing” should be handled in our society. I am aware of David Friedman and Rothbard, of course, but perhaps you could give me some more ideas. Take care.

  36. #36 |  BSK | 

    cynical-

    I don’t know exactly all the discussions you’ve gotten into with regards to anarchism, but I don’t think it’s fair to consider legitimate criticism or disagreement with anarchism or its tenets can necessarily be defined as “anti-anarchism”. In a very simplistic rendering, I suppose you can offer a black/white duality, but it’s a bit intellectually dishonest. Maybe you have come up against legitimate anti-anarchists here, but barring outright animosity or antagonism, even those ideas ought to be entertained as part of the public discourse. I’m new to the site and while I probably disagree with you more than I agree, I do value your perspective and hope you can contribute to the discussion. You may take a few arrows along the way, but if considered thoughtfully, they will only lead you to a stronger position (even if they move you the least bit away from anarchism).

  37. #37 |  qwints | 

    I have almost no problem with the Vermont marijuana raid (“Color me dubious”), assuming they executed the warrant in a reasonable manner. There are no legal issues with cops patrolling residential neighborhoods as long as they don’t conduct any searches without probable cause. There’s no right of privacy to keep cops off you door step, though they have to and should leave your property if you ask them to.

  38. #38 |  albatross | 

    Helmut:

    Is there a good way to work out how common the problems we often describe here really are? News reporting always magnifies the rare horrible events, and that’s definitely true of Radley’s reporting on wrong-door raids where they shoot the dog, the homeowner, two game wardens, and a cow.

    Do you feel like you’ve got a good handle on how common the coverups, “blue wall of silence,” etc., are, relative to the positive stuff that policemen also do (like arresting robbers and drunk drivers)?

  39. #39 |  Cynical in CA | 

    #36 | BSK

    Thanks for taking the time to respond BSK.

    “I don’t know exactly all the discussions you’ve gotten into with regards to anarchism, but I don’t think it’s fair to consider legitimate criticism or disagreement with anarchism or its tenets can necessarily be defined as “anti-anarchism”.”

    Honest discussion of non-violent human interaction is completely legitimate BSK. I object to those who misconstrue anarchism by conveniently using the common-usage definition to demonize their opponent. The common-usage definition of anarchism is outright false. Anarchism is defined by non-violence, or at least the non-initiation of violence with defensive violence permissible under specific conditions. I am finding more and more on this site that rational discussion of anarchism properly defined is giving way to demonization by association with violent “totalitarian anarchists,” to use a phrase popularized by another commentor here.

    “In a very simplistic rendering, I suppose you can offer a black/white duality, but it’s a bit intellectually dishonest.”

    I really don’t think so, BSK. Anarchism means the non-initiation of violence. The State is defined by its self-enforced monopoly on the initiation of violence. That is as black/white as it comes. The world can be binary, on or off, 0 or 1. Logic depends on that principle.

    “Maybe you have come up against legitimate anti-anarchists here, but barring outright animosity or antagonism, even those ideas ought to be entertained as part of the public discourse.”

    Very true, and I agree wholeheartedly, and I will continue to participate in discussions with these individuals.

    “I’m new to the site and while I probably disagree with you more than I agree, I do value your perspective and hope you can contribute to the discussion. You may take a few arrows along the way, but if considered thoughtfully, they will only lead you to a stronger position (even if they move you the least bit away from anarchism).”

    Very well put, BSK. What you wrote there means a lot to me. Your comments are thought-provoking as well and I look forward to exploring this and other subjects with you in the future.

  40. #40 |  Cynical in CA | 

    #35 | Helmut O’ Hooligan

    “Sorry to hear you feel the blog has become inhospitable. You and I have had some productive conversatiosn on the topic of anarchism vs. limited government.”

    Well, not totally inhospitable. Everyone has bad days, Helmut, I’ll bounce back. I have always relished our exchanges, especially since you are a limited government proponent with, it appears to me, one foot out of the door.

    “One thing I feel compelled to mention to you before I go is that I have basically decided to stop looking at public sector law enforcement jobs at this point.”

    One must make decisions for oneself, and I wonder if you could pursue work as a private-sector detective?

    “The Agitator and other news sources have led me to the decision that the system is broken and I simply would not fit in.”

    One never knows exactly how it would play out, but knowing oneself is the most important thing in the world. My belief about statist systems is that the person who sets out to change the system will wind up changed by it. Far better to abandon the State and find a different way. I think you made a good decision.

    “I am not an anarchist, but I have principles that I believe would be compromised if I opted to continue looking at LEO jobs. I will be more open-minded about the private sector from this point on.”

    You are not an anarchist … yet. ;-)

    “Would you recommend any books that have influenced your views on how “policing” should be handled in our society. I am aware of David Friedman and Rothbard, of course, but perhaps you could give me some more ideas. Take care.”

    I can list the authors I have read, but not all get specific about how systems would be managed in an anarchic society (that’s kind of the point, systems would evolve without central direction). Butler Shaffer, John Hasnas, Delmar England, Roy A. Childs, Robert LeFevre, Stefan Molyneux, Albert Jay Nock, Herbert Spencer, Lysander Spooner, Sheldon Richman … the list goes on and on. Just about any anarchist site will have a library of links.

    The DRO, or dispute resolution organization, is probably the most common solution to policing in an anarchic society. English common law basically evolved from competing judicial systems (crown courts, merchant courts, religious courts, etc.). There is historical precedent.

    It has been interesting to see how some of us have evolved on this site — I don’t know if it’s my own bias, but I sense the approach of a heightened awareness of the rot within Western society based on the anecdotes and news stories of greater resistance to the State. Needless to say, I find the trend heartening. Great to exchange ideas with you as always Helmut, thanks.

  41. #41 |  JOR | 

    “The common-usage definition of anarchism is outright false.”

    Not false, exactly, but it is dishonest to argue against self-proclaimed anarchists as if they’re using the common-usage definition when they describe their own views. Especially when they lay out what they mean by anarchy/anarchism over and over and over and over…

  42. #42 |  Helmut O' Hooligan | 

    #38 Albatross:
    Thank you for your comments. In addition to being a “news junkie” (mainstream media, alternative media and a couple of blogs, including The Agitator and Cop in the Hood, by former Baltimore Police Officer Peter Moskos) my father was a police officer. I had a lot of exposure to policing from day one. This continued into ride-alongs and college internships. I have seen many of the positive aspects of policing, I just think that the drug war (and associated issues such as police militarization and asset forfeiture abuses) and the overreach of the state in many areas has made it nearly impossible to move policing in the direction I would like to see it go.

    This is not a decision I took lightly. Many of these revelations have been hard to take. I devoted much of my time to studying criminal justice issues, and I will continue to do so even if I don’t go into a public sector career. In the end, law enforcement turned on me, I didn’t turn on it.

  43. #43 |  Helmut O' Hooligan | 

    #40 Cynical in CA:

    Thanks for responding. First, I accidently gave you a -1. Sorry about that. I guess I have fat fingers ;)

    Actually I have considered working in the area of private investigation. At the moment I am working in healthcare security, and I have obtained training in and out of work that could make that a viable option in the future. While working as a non-sworn officer, I have enjoyed the fact that I don’t have to be a drug warrior, or fill other roles that public police are expected to fill. I am simply here to protect patients, visitors, staff, and campus property. The pay isn’t super, but oh well. We aren’t government police, after all.

    Thank you for the list of authors/theorists, and thanks for challenging me. I will try to do some research in the near future. Have a good weekend.

  44. #44 |  BSK | 

    Cynical-

    Just saw your response now. Thanks. One challenge I would offer to you, in light of the problem you have identified with the public perception of anarchism, is to help correct it. In dialogues like the one we are having, you do a fantastic job of that. However, at other times, I would say that you are more dismissive of people who take a less palatable tone with you. And maybe if that is deserved. But, if part of your goal is to better advocate on behalf of your beliefs (which we should all strive for), then education is a big part of that. You’ll naturally meet people who are going to think what they’re going to think, regardless of what the truth is. C’est la vie. But there are people who may be genuinely misinformed/uninformed or people who otherwise are willing to listen. They may not necessarily come to your side of the table, but they may (as I have) learn something that allows them to better understand/appreciate your ideology. For myself, posters like yourself and others out there have helped me learn that “anarchy” is a political ideology/philosophy, and isn’t just a term to throw around when watching “V for Vendetta”. Obviously, part of the problem is how self-identified anarchists have bastardized the term (The Anarchist’s Cookbook, for instance), but that is another fight for another day.

    Good day to you, sir.

Leave a Reply