New Professionalism Roundup

Wednesday, September 23rd, 2009
  • Merced, California police tase weaponless double amputee, leave him handcuffed, pantless on the ground.
  • Ex-deputy settles with county after police wrongly raided his home in search of a homicide suspect. The interesting part of this story is that a camera crew from the TV show Cops was with the raid team. The Cops producers apparently destroyed the film of the raid.
  • Ex-Chicago cops plead guilty to warrantless raids in which they stole money, beat and threatened people, and in one case detained and withheld insulin from a diabetic until he told them where they could find more cash. They’ll get six months in jail.
  • Entire Jericho, Arkansas fire department resigns in protest of charges against their fire chief, who was shot in the back in court by police while protesting a traffic ticket.
  • Lawsuit alleges drunk, off-duty Pittsburgh cop stopped, detained, beat, and shot a man after mistaking him for someone the cop says assaulted him at a traffic stop. The cop is back on the job after an arbitrator determined his actions were “inappropriate, imprudent and ill-advised,” but not criminal. He also had three previous complaints against him with the city’s civilian review board.
  • Finally, a little comic relief.
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  • 69 Responses to “New Professionalism Roundup”

    1. #1 |  Nando | 

      Will someone explain to me how public intoxication, beating a man on the street (aggravated assault, since he used a deadly weapon), threatening the life of a person by putting a gun in his face, and shooting him in the hand is “inappropriate, imprudent and ill-advised” behavior but not criminal?

      If I were to do this to Joe Blow on Elm St., I’d be arrested, tried criminally, and sent to prison. This guy, because he’s a cop, gets to go back to his job?

      This makes me want to take up vigilantism and shoot the cop in the nuts (the judge probably deserves it, too).

    2. #2 |  Lucy | 

      Perhaps that guy will be drunkenly beating protesters in the streets tomorrow and the next day! How extremely comforting to have him in out city.

    3. #3 |  perlhaqr | 

      Pardon me…

      AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAARGH!

      Ok, I’m better now.

    4. #4 |  JS | 

      Good for those firemen! Firemen enjoy widespread public respect and anytime they stand up against the Gestapo it must undermine the public’s trust in the police, which is desperately needed if we are to see any sort of change for the better.

    5. #5 |  Hut | 

      A town of 174 has 18 firefighters? What am I missing?

    6. #6 |  J sub D | 

      The interesting part of this story is that a camera crew from the TV show Cops was with the raid team. The Cops producers apparently destroyed the film of the raid.

      The producers of Cops know what LEO sperm licked off a boot tastes like. God, I despise that show.

    7. #7 |  Highway | 

      18 Firefighters isn’t that many. You can’t really do anything with less than 6 people at a time, so you end up with 3 crews of 6 people. I’d imagine that’s about the minimum you’ll ever get for a full-time fire department.

    8. #8 |  J sub D | 

      A town of 174 has 18 firefighters? What am I missing?

      I’m guessing it’s a volunteer fire department, pretty common in small towns.. Nobody gets paid and nobody’s “on duty”.

    9. #9 |  Boyd Durkin | 

      First, their post-nuke-America TV show gets cancelled. Now Jericho has no firemen or police.

      I wonder what the record is for a prison sentence given to a cop for something he did while in uniform. I’m betting it is under 3 years (unless it was something like snitching on cops).

    10. #10 |  Waste | 

      The Pittsburgh judge is an idiot and should be removed from the bench. Hope the victim files a complaint againt him with the ethics committee. Though lawyers tend to cover for each other too.

      Not illegal? Lets see though state laws differ you have assault, assault with a deadly weapon, harassment, menacing, attempted murder, carrying a weapon while intoxicated, false imprisonment, public intoxication, and discharging a weapon within the city limits.

      So what part wasn’t illegal?

      I noticed in the story it didn’t appear to be a jury trial. If that is the case it makes you wonder if the officer had many cases in front of this judge or their prior contact.

    11. #11 |  J sub D | 

      I’m not up to a cynical or outraged comment for each of the rest of the outrages this morning.

      Sorry.

    12. #12 |  Waste | 

      I wonder if the former sgt has a claim against the producers of Cops for tampering with evidence. Also makes me wonder what their policy is about destroying their tapes and how common this is.

      Hut,

      As was mentioned it’s probably a volunteer department. Number is about right. Also they probably cover an area of the county not just the town.

    13. #13 |  dave smith | 

      It is kind of amazing. When some white person critizes Obama’s policies, I never think racism could be involved. But a white cop tases a black dude with no legs, OF COURSE racism was a motivation.

    14. #14 |  Boyd Durkin | 

      “Trying to protect himself, Mr. Miller put his right hand over the back of his head and was shot in the hand.

      “After plaintiff suffered the right hand gunshot wound, he fell to the ground on his right side, at which point plaintiff viewed defendant Abel seated on the sidewalk, twirling his pistol,” the complaint said.

      Judge Manning said what he did was “inappropriate, imprudent and ill-advised,” but not criminal.”

      Now I’m no fancy-pants lawyer, but I’m pretty sure this means I can shoot anyone I please as long as I claim I thought they had attacked me earlier. YEEE-HAAAAWW!

      Oh, wait. I have to be a LEO. Mr. Miller was a well-placed hand away from getting a bullet in the back of his head.

    15. #15 |  Packratt | 

      @9 Boyd,

      As I’ve figured it so far, the average incarceration sentence for a convicted police officer over the last 5 months (the time I’ve been tracking so far) has been 12 months, for non-cops it’s 37 months.

      Incarceration rate per conviction for officers is 63% while it’s 72% for the rest of us…. and the conviction rate for police officers is 30% while it’s 68% for the rest of us.

      But, as I said, that’s just from the data I’ve gathered over the last 5 months.

    16. #16 |  hamburglar007 | 

      #5 | Hut | September 23rd, 2009 at 11:10 am
      A town of 174 has 18 firefighters? What am I missing?

      You can’t have just one or two people working the truck, equipment, fire suppression, and searching/rescuing/treating people.

    17. #17 |  USAA_SUCKS | 

      Nando,

      It wasn’t criminal because the acts were committed by an officer of the law. You know, one of those golden boys on a pedestal because he’s a “first responder” and is “protecting and serving.”

      And six months for those cops in Chicago. What a load of crap! Who says crime doesn’t pay. It pays pretty good when you do it with a badge pinned to your chest.

      The state of so-called law enforcement in this country disgusts me. I say again, I wouldn’t call the cops if I found a dead body on my front porch. The first person they’d want to fuck with would be me. I’m better off dragging it out on the curb and leaving it there.

    18. #18 |  ARCraig | 

      I have to say, as an insulin-dependent diabetic, the idea of medical treatment being withheld from me is without a doubt what terrifies me the most about possibly being arrested.

    19. #19 |  Judas Peckerwood | 

      Once upon a time, I could never imagine why someone who wasn’t a desperate criminal would ever have any reason to shoot a cop.

    20. #20 |  Mike Leatherwood | 

      “Force doesn’t kill people. People kill people.”

      Amen. Now we just need to inform the police that they are people.

    21. #21 |  Chris in AL | 

      “Entire Jericho, Arkansas fire department resigns in protest of charges against their fire chief, who was shot in the back in court by police while protesting a traffic ticket”

      This becomes truly beautiful if now the police headquarters in Jericho catches on fire.

    22. #22 |  David | 

      “Two uniformed officers arrived and said that Mr. Miller was under arrest. Later, however, after they realized he had not assaulted Officer Abel, he was released and taken to the hospital for treatment.”

      They arrested him before taking him for treatment of a gunshot wound? And only after they realized that he been assaulted for nothing?

      Fucking cops and their buddy system. I suppose the silver lining is that the didn’t charge him with using his head to assault the officer’s fist, resisting arrest and the usual list of CYA charges.

    23. #23 |  Bart Maka, Guadalupe Salinas, Brian Pratscher, and Donovan Markiewicz, Chicago Police Officers, Plead Guilty To Reign of Terror and Get A Whole Sixth Months. | Popehat | 

      [...] Via Radley Balko. [...]

    24. #24 |  MDGuy | 

      #10 | Waste | September 23rd, 2009 at 11:20 am

      Lets see though state laws differ you have assault, assault with a deadly weapon, harassment, menacing, attempted murder, carrying a weapon while intoxicated, false imprisonment, public intoxication, and discharging a weapon within the city limits.

      You forgot the DUI.

    25. #25 |  sirhcton | 

      Regarding the tape erased by the Cops production company:

      I have often wondered about their relationship with the departments they record. Surely, during all the time they are recording, there must be “unfortunate” incidents of various kinds. Is it that the police determine what gets deleted and never shown? Does the shift briefing include “Ok, the Cops crew is filming us today; everyone be on your best behavior”? Does anyone know of suits by possible victims involving the those recordings?

    26. #26 |  Pablo | 

      I too am just too burnt out on this stuff for a cynical or outraged post. Will just say that the more I read about it the less paranoid it sounds to say that there will be a backlash and it won’t be pretty.

    27. #27 |  Nando | 

      BTW, here is some contact info, in case you want to call/mail/contact anyone concerning the drunken cop who beat and shot the other man, then was found innocent:

      His Precinct:
      Zone 3 Police Station
      830 E Warrington
      Pittsburgh, PA 15210
      412-488-8326
      Ask for CMDR. Larry Ross

      Assistant Chief William Bochter
      Operations Branch
      1203 Western Avenue
      Pittsburgh, PA 15233
      Phone: 412-323-7821

    28. #28 |  Waste | 

      David,

      The fact that he was arrested prior to treatment isn’t a big deal. It’s fairly common in many cases however it also usually means the police department is responsible for the medical bills.

      Also from the story it seems like he was arrested and released on scene. Also most jails don’t take injured suspects without a medical clearance because of liability issues. It would be interesting to see how severe the wound was in this case. On first read it seems like a graze. This also seems as if the case as a hand would in most cases not stop a round from entering head if it was straight on.

    29. #29 |  Ginger Dan | 

      Radley

      Thanks for including the Reno 911 clip at the end. Going forward I think the ratio of humor to ulcer-inducing cop stories should be more in the range of 2:1 or 3:1 (or you could just stagger the same clip in between each “new professionalism” story.

    30. #30 |  Waste | 

      sirhcton,

      There was a story on here awhile back about a gambling raid in Dallas I think where a film crew was along. There were some issues with getting the tape for the defense in that case though I don’t think it was erased. I think the charges were dropped and the tape never produced.

    31. #31 |  ClubMedSux | 

      “Force doesn’t kill people. People kill people.”

      Amen. Now we just need to inform the police that they are people.

      More importantly, we need to inform the police that the citizens they are sworn to protect are people.

    32. #32 |  John Wilburn | 

      Guys, we need to take comfort in these stories about our “heroes” in blue – they serve as justification for the pogrom of LEO’s (and other inferior life-forms) that is soon to come, when the proletariat has had enough…

    33. #33 |  Packratt | 

      @26 Nando

      It’s a nice idea, but here’s the problem… contacting the PD to complain about them being forced by an arbitrator to rehire a police officer they tried to fire is ineffectual at best, counterproductive at worst. Even if they tried to fire him again due to public pressure they would then be forced to rehire him again and the process would cost taxpayers even more.

      This is the problem with giving police unions arbitration rights, the arbitrator’s job is to find any possible problem with the disciplinary process and overrule it if any loophole is found… his job isn’t to consider public safety. Then once the cop is rehired, the city gets the flack while the arbitrator doesn’t face any consequences once that officer hurts someone else once returned to work, and they often do.

    34. #34 |  Ron Good | 

      I think the producers of C.O.P.S. know what the chances are for the continuation of their very profitable ride-alongs if their recordings–even once–ever end up as the evidence that convicts a LEO.

      Or the destroyed tape could just have been a technical glitch. Maybe I’m just too suspicious.

    35. #35 |  the friendly grizzly | 

      I have seen LEOs on other websites who are members of OathKeepers. Putting aside their daily violation of their enlistment or commission oaths, I wonder what percentage of them would side with the people vs siding with the government when the order comes to start the roundups.

      The OathKeepers talk a good story, but when push comes to shove, I am sure they will be thinking “good paycheck and great pension. Do I give that up to support a few civilians? Hey! What’s a few [insert government target here] when I have a family to feed?

      I had friends whose parents were subjects of Germany’s new world order experiements. They ALL warned that the ones you have to be the most careful of are the police. The ones who smile at you and buy from your business this week will be screaming “raus! raus!” next week. And I believe them.

    36. #36 |  Mattocracy | 

      The news agencies will panic about every epidemic imaginable. Obesity (horseshit), SARS (remember that disease that we were all gonna die from?), rising crime rates (crime has been declining every where for over a decade), right wing extremism (have domestic terrorist done anything since oklahoma city?)

      But heaven forbid any journalist talk about the crushing police brutality and racketeering that exists in just about every department in the country. There is enough links on this website to do a whole miniseries of documentaries.

    37. #37 |  omar | 

      There is enough links on this website to do a whole miniseries of documentaries.

      I think a more suitable format would be sitcom. Oh wait, last link!

    38. #38 |  John Wilburn | 

      I need to apologize for my poor choice of word. Instead of “pogrom” (which usually, but not always, applies to the abuses suffered by the Jews) I should have used “extermination.”

      My point was that historically, the excesses of those in power quite often results in the violent uprising of those who are being abused, exploited and violated…

      I deeply regret my faux pas, and extend my sincerest apologies to all…

    39. #39 |  Waste | 

      John,

      I think any kind of government round up / extermination would be rather difficult here in the US. Many LEO and military would not follow those orders. I know we hear lots of stories of abuse by law enforcement on this site. But there would still be a fair number of resistance to such an order. I think many LEO justify their abuse as it being done to the ‘bad guy’. In many cases that wouldn’t hold in a mass round up event.

      More importantly you also have a large armed populace. Once armed resistance started, and it would, the LEO would be out numbered and out gunned. They also lack the training to deal with those kinds of situations. The LEO basic tactic in such case is a seige mentality. They try to wait them out (Waco and Ruby Ridge). Or at least wait long enough it would generate a large public awareness of the situation because of the media.

      More than a couple of such cases going on at the same time or in close time frame would require military intervention. Though for a mass roundup you would have to use military anyways. There are not enough LEO’s for a mass roundup and detention. And as I said earlier, the military would basically revolt at such an order here in the US. Once the military turns against it the government would fall. The military has the equipment and training to make short work of anyone that got in their way.

    40. #40 |  SDB | 

      @9

      A now former officer in Indianapolis was sentenced to 10-15 years for helping two other cops break into drug dealers homes, stealing their money and drugs, and reselling the drugs. This was because he agreed to testify against the other 2 officers. I’m not sure if the sentences or verdicts have come in the case of the other 2. Just one instance

    41. #41 |  bob42 | 

      After a thorough investigation, internal affairs recommended charging the pay phone with obstructing a police officer.

    42. #42 |  Eddie | 

      The quote from Judge Manning in this article is incomplete. Here’s the whole thing from a June article on the acquittal.

      Judge Manning called the altercation “inappropriate, imprudent and ill-advised.” But, he said, “It is not the obligation of this court to police the police department.”
      Read more: http://www.pittsburghpostgazette.com/pg/09162/976712-100.stm#ixzz0RxZgvANZ

    43. #43 |  Daniel | 

      There were no charges filed against the chief. If you read the story, it says the mayor fired him, but it doesn’t say anything about any charges being filed. This is an important detail. The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette also ran a story last week saying the local prosecutor would not file charges against either the fire chief or the police.

    44. #44 |  Packratt | 

      @43 Daniel

      The latest out today is that the fire chief is facing two felony charges and a warrant has been issued for his arrest. Also, the police force is back on duty after the mayor initially said it was going to be disbanded.

      http://www.todaysthv.com/news/news.aspx?storyid=91431

      Furthermore, other reports I’ve read indicate that the police officers are threatening to also file a civil suit against the fire chief over the incident… so it sounds like the town officials are really taking a viciously hard line on this one.

    45. #45 |  hamburglar007 | 

      Waste,

      Sorry, but I think you are way too optimistic about the human condition. What you said might be true if they were rounding up a group of people that are not a minority, but if you take another group, say muslims, and a terror attack linked to people following Islam, it would probably be easier than you think.

    46. #46 |  Chris in AL | 

      Off topic, but apparently Radley got things worked out with Google ads?

    47. #47 |  Robert | 

      Words cannot express how badly I want the Jericho police station to burn down because there is no fire department. Bonus points if the former members of the fire department get to the scene and watch it burn down. Special fatality points if the cop that shot the fire chief in the back gets trapped in the conflagration.

    48. #48 |  Mario | 

      Eddie @ #42

      “It is not the obligation of this court to police the police department.”

      God, almighty! That makes it even worse. That’s a bold-faced statement coming from a judge that means “regular” Americans live under one set of laws, and police live under another. What else could it possibly mean? The cop here wasn’t acting in any official capacity. He was off-duty and drunk.

      I’ve said it before: being a cop is not the same thing as being knighted on the head. In a free, classless society, you’re a cop only insofar as you are acting in your legally authorized role.

      Shame on that judge!

    49. #49 |  sirhcton | 

      I think the producers of C.O.P.S. know what the chances are for the continuation of their very profitable ride-alongs if their recordings–even once–ever end up as the evidence that convicts a LEO.

      Oh, I am almost sure of that, one way or another. I am just curious as to the details of the symbiotic relationship.

    50. #50 |  Waste | 

      hamburglar007,

      Don’t think so. After the US experience during WWII with the Japanese internment it would be difficult for something like that to occur again. I think your hypothetical proves that point. We’ve had numerous attacks linked to Islam yet no roundup.

      Also the original question was about a roundup and execution. Something more severe than just a roundup. But either one would be difficult to pull off now adays.

      Technology makes instant access to information easy. Look at what happened in Iran after the election. In a controlled country the government could not keep the information from getting out and being accessed. In a large open society it would be even more difficult.

    51. #51 |  SJE | 

      Note that the Pittsburgh story does the usual media soft-pedal on cop abuse stories. It starts with stating that the cop was accused of “excessive force and false imprisonment”: the average reader will think this is just another one of those dime a dozen stories of bogus allegations by career criminals making life hard for the boys in blue. Read no further.

      If they had started the story with “drunk, off-duty cop assaults and shoots innocent man” you would be sure that readers would read the rest of the story and maybe complain or at least be more critical of police stories. Of course, the cops would complain too.

      As long as the MSM continue to report these incidents with a pro-cop stance they will continue to be a barrier to reform.

    52. #52 |  Robert V | 

      “Conservative” websites, like this diary from Redstate:

      http://www.redstate.com/swamp_yankee/2009/09/22/mr-president-waterboard-that-man/

      are amazing in that they have this incredible, mind-numbing fear of terroists; yet they will not acknowledge that they are far, far more likely to be assualted and attacked by police.

    53. #53 |  Frank | 

      And this is not going to help:

      http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5jbzG_BlkG2Hfc818EPRRn1bBlP6gD9AT92400

      The FBI is investigating the hanging death of a U.S. Census worker near a Kentucky cemetery, and a law enforcement official told The Associated Press the word ‘fed” was scrawled on the dead man’s chest.

    54. #54 |  Michael Chaney | 

      The cops in the first one probably watched this video:

      http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=54d_1227661439

    55. #55 |  JS | 

      It’d be funny as hell if the police station caught on fire in that town.

    56. #56 |  Mattocracy | 

      @ Robert V,

      That pretty much has summed up the hypocrisy of the GOP. Corporate and Police protectionism is the new American way.

    57. #57 |  Ohio Dale Boley | 

      Just think how many jobs could be created if corrupt police officers were all suddenly fired.

    58. #58 |  Nash | 

      One for the win column

      http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/21061513/detail.html

    59. #59 |  KBCraig | 

      The fired fire chief of Jericho has now been charged with two felony counts.

      It must really suck to get shot in the ass, then f*&C#ed in the ass.

      http://www.katv.com/news/stories/0909/662045.html

    60. #60 |  anonymous | 

      > Entire Jericho, Arkansas fire department
      > resigns in protest of charges
      > against their fire chief, who was shot in the back
      > in court by police while protesting a traffic ticket.

      It always bothers me that the police are allowed to carry guns into court, but civilians are not.

      One of the rationales is that court can get emotional, and therefore some hot headed gun owner might shoot somebody. This argument was trotted out by the anti-gunners for several years before Colorado finally enacted its shall-issue CCW law in 2003.

      The only court-room shooting with a lawfully carried weapon in Colorado that I am aware of occurred in 1986, when Aurora police officer Gerald Utesch shot his wife’s divorce lawyer. * The shooting prompted court houses in Colorado to tighten security [ http://www.westword.com/1998-08-06/news/fortress-of-solitude/ ], but cops — not just the bailiff’s responsible for security — are permitted to carry guns into court. Some citizens are more equal before the law than others.

      It was interesting how the hypocrisy of the anti-gunners and police forces paralleled each other.

      * That case had interesting ramifications for the state. The Utesch case was prosecuted by Bill Ritter, who went on to become Denver D.A., and is now governor of Colorado.

      Shortly after the Utesch case, Ritter left the country. Utesch’s victim “believes Ritter left for Africa in part because he feared he could not be an effective prosecutor after pursuing charges against a policeman. ” [ http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_4113098 ]

      Upon returning, he became Denver’s D.A.. During his tenure, “His office sent more teenagers to prison for life-without- parole than any other DA’s office in the state.”

      But

      “Perhaps the biggest knock against Ritter’s record as DA is that he never prosecuted a police officer in more than 70 incidents where police gunfire wounded or killed someone. . . The city shelled out more than $3 million to settle 11 excessive-force cases during his tenure, an analysis of records shows. Many of those officers are still on the street.

    61. #61 |  anonymous | 

      > #30 | Waste | September 23rd, 2009 at 1:12 pm
      > There was a story on here awhile back about a gambling raid
      > in Dallas I think where a film crew was along.
      > There were some issues with getting the tape for the defense
      > in that case though I don’t think it was erased.
      > I think the charges were dropped and the tape never produced.

      The show was “Dallas SWAT.” See http://www.theagitator.com/2007/04/20/tales-of-a-dallas-poker-raid/ (April 20, 2007)

    62. #62 |  Dave Krueger | 

      #1 Nando

      Will someone explain to me how public intoxication, beating a man on the street (aggravated assault, since he used a deadly weapon), threatening the life of a person by putting a gun in his face, and shooting him in the hand is “inappropriate, imprudent and ill-advised” behavior but not criminal?

      Simple. When cops do it, it’s not a crime. It’s an honest mistake.

      If I were to do this to Joe Blow on Elm St., I’d be arrested, tried criminally, and sent to prison. This guy, because he’s a cop, gets to go back to his job?

      That’s because when you (a mere ordinary faceless expendable member of the masses) do it, it’s because you’re a cold callous irresponsible hooligan. By the way, you don’t need to assault someone to fit into this category. A traffic ticket is sufficient.

    63. #63 |  Dave Krueger | 

      #57 Ohio Dale Boley

      Just think how many jobs could be created if corrupt police officers were all suddenly fired.

      Hell, if you got rid of the corrupt cops, the crime rate would probably drop by so much that you wouldn’t even need to fill their jobs.

    64. #64 |  Boyd Durkin | 

      @58 Nash,
      That story has everything! Time for “Police Buzzword Bingo!”

      — Investigation to see if Police policy was broken? BINGO. Official policy is “Do whatever the fuck you want…you’re a cop!”
      — Fired cops? Not a bingo word, but I’ll bet $1 million that we’ll see this…
      — Cops reinstated with full back pay? BINGO (although we’ll have to wait for the appeal. Stupid Townies! Think they can actually fire a cop!?!?!?!?!!??! Paid vacation time.
      — Cop says he was struck by the tractor? BINGO! How the fuck do you get hit by a 5mph tractor coming right at you unless you’ve put yourself in danger (or are a lying scumbag)? Someone please roll the Austin Powers steamroller clip.
      — Cop says his vehicle was hit? BINGO! That’s a favorite trick to ram your police vehicle into the citizen so THEY get charged with “assaulting a police officer”.

      and finally…
      — Cheese dick cop needs a tazer to take down an old man because he needed to drive his antique tractor a block to the park instead of being directed where the asswipe cop deemed he shall go? BINGO!

      God forbid the tractor had been allowed to be driven to the park where the old man had planned on running over small children (or parking it so small children could play on it). Hero cops saved town from mass chaos.

    65. #65 |  omar | 

      Another no-knock goes wrong, cops and suspects shot. There’s no explanation in the article from the cops why they had to storm in at 2:30 am instead of apprehending the suspect at the QT while getting his morning late.

      http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5g-k3NpbXkmGdeM_emGFzCr0lVhBwD9ATNTE01

    66. #66 |  John Wilburn | 

      @Nash #58

      I think it’s a little premature to call this a win –

      “John Robinson, an attorney representing Brown and Kavenius, said the officers will appeal the firing.”

      Cops usually win on appeal…

      “Earlier this month, Robinson said the officers acted appropriately, broke no police procedures and should be reinstated to normal duty. The officers had been on paid administrative leave since the day of the incident.”

      First things first – since they broke no “police procedures,” they get a paid vacation, courtesy of the taxpayers…

      “The town hired S.J. Miller Associates of Cheyenne to review whether the officers broke department policies.”

      Since “Department Policies” are Holy Writ, they were simply, “following orders” (we know – we heard it at Nuremberg…)…

      “The details of the internal review weren’t available Tuesday. Police Chief Tom Sweet was away from the office and unavailable for comment, a dispatcher said.
      Mayor Steve Cielinski was working at his day job at a Casper hospital and couldn’t be reached for comment.”

      Gee, what a surprise – the powers that be (who are paid by, therefore accountable to, the taxpayers) were unavailable for comment…

      “The Division of Criminal Investigation report said Grose disobeyed Kavenius’ traffic command and steered around Kavenius to head toward the town park rather than the end of the parade. Kavenius told state investigators he was struck by Grose’s tractor, but Grose denied hitting the officer.”

      Which is it Officer Kavenius – he steered around you, or he hit you? Apparently, the laws of physics don’t apply in official police reports…

      The obvious answer to all of these stories about police misconduct is to hold the police to the same standard as any other citizen. Otherwise, the police have no credibility as “Upholders of the Law, and Protectors of the People,” (which is the case now).

    67. #67 |  PW | 

      Here’s one for the new professionalism record books.

      http://www.philly.com/philly/news/homepage/20090924_Animal-cruelty_charges_dropped_against_Burlington_County_cop.html

      Officer Robert Melia of Burlington County, NJ likes having sex…with cows. New Jersey does not have a bestiality law though, so Melia was charged under the animal cruelty statutes.

      Yesterday a judge threw out the charges against him on the grounds that it could not be determined if Melia’s sexual violation of the cows was actually “cruel.” Actual quote from the judge on why he dropped the charges:

      “If the cow had the cognitive ability to form thought and speak, would it say, ‘Where’s the milk? I’m not getting any milk,’ ” Judge James J. Morley asked.

      All we’re missing from this story is the local Fraternal Order of Police union rep demanding Melia’s reinstatement with back pay since his cow fucker charges were dropped.

      Fortunately though, Melia still faces prosecution for multiple unrelated counts of sexual assault against three children. Yeah, this cop is simply that horrible of a human being.

      There is something seriously wrong with this country though if a cop cannot even be charged for raping cows in a field. And that makes me wonder if he’ll ever meet justice for also attempting to rape children.

    68. #68 |  Brian | 

      Search warrants and Wii, 9 hours worth.

      http://mashable.com/2009/09/23/drug-raid-wii/

    69. #69 |  Jon Hendry | 

      Waste wrote: “After the US experience during WWII with the Japanese internment it would be difficult for something like that to occur again”

      They’re law enforcement officers.

      Change the law, and they’ll enforce it. Whatever it is.

      And they’ll use whatever level of force they care to use in order to keep themselves safe while enforcing the law.

      What they won’t do is question the law.

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