Morning Links

Monday, August 24th, 2009
  • The customer is not always right. This one made me laugh.
  • William Calley apologizes for My Lai.
  • Physicist claims to have discovered why time only moves in one direction.
  • Decorated, 18-year Air Force pilot may be dishonorably discharged after being forced to admit to police that he’s gay. He had been falsely accused of rape.
  • Animal prosthetics.
  • Obama DOJ advises reopening, possibly prosecuting CIA interrogation abuse cases.
  • I’m agnostic. But wow, if there is a God? This guy’s in big, big trouble.
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  • 26 Responses to “Morning Links”

    1. #1 |  Fluffy | 

      In the article about the guy who stole a painting of the Virgin Mary to finance an abortion for the 14 year old he raped, they forgot to tell you about how he managed to steal the painting in the first place: he crumpled up stolen Communion wafers and pissed on them to make a pile high enough to break through a stained glass window, and then he stuck the painting in a sack he made by tearing up the shroud of Turin and tying it into a bag shape. He then drove off in the carjacked Popemobile at high speed, running down screaming priests and nuns who tried to block his way.

    2. #2 |  Boyd Durkin | 

      Why were we in Vietnam again?

      I do NOT need them on that wall.

    3. #3 |  Mattocracy | 

      The elephant leg prosthectic was my favorite. I would have liked it more if it was a trunk prosthetic.

    4. #4 |  adolphus | 

      On the same page as the Virgin stealer/rapist/abortionist:

      Cop allegedly poses as twin for sex
      Aug. 24: A police officer in Connecticut is charged with first degree sexual assault and criminal impersonation after police say he posed as his twin brother to have sex with a woman.

      Never a dull moment.

    5. #5 |  J sub D | 

      Fehrenbach asked Obama for his help and urged him to repeal “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.” Fehrenbach told Maddow that night that Obama said: “We’re gonna get this done.”

      We’re waiting. Does anybody think the Chosen One can get that done before he gets the troops out of Iraq?

    6. #6 |  Pseudonymous Coward | 

      I too was discharged from the U.S. Air Force in August of 2000 for violating “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell”. In my case, it was because my boyfriend at the time was an NCO in my squadron (I was an airman), but not in my chain of command. My commander found out about the relationship in June and I was brought in for a meeting with her, my NCOIC (the boss of my office), and the first sergeant. When my commander instructed me to end the relationship because of its potential for charges of fraternization, I blurted out without thinking, “Ma’am, he’s not in my chain of command.” Because I said “he” instead of “the individual” or something similar, it amounted to an admission of committing homosexual acts and I was taken out of my job working on classified communications and transferred to a warehouse, where I spent the next two months totin’ that barge and liftin’ that bale while I waited for them to throw me out. Four months before I had been a minor military celebrity for something I did, the circumstances of which I’d prefer not to share to protect my anonymity, including receiving the personal coins of two four-star generals and — despite being an enlisted man — given a traditional naval “wetting-down” by a group of aviators. My last performance review for the military, conducted less than a month before my discharge, went from glowing comments to the line “I am convinced that A1C (Name) is a danger to himself and others.”

      I sincerely hope that Lt Col Fehrenbach becomes the gay serviceman’s Rosa Parks.

    7. #7 |  Tim Worstall | 

      “in big, big trouble.”

      Well, kinda depends *which* God.

      Zoroaster (or was he their prophet?) probably wouldn’t even blink.

    8. #8 |  David | 

      This is the best story on Not Always Right. I just pray it’s true.

    9. #9 |  PeeDub | 

      I’m pretty sure I’ve heard the time/entropy explanation before. I’m pretty sure that it was in A Brief History of Time. I’m pretty sure that there’s a physicist with some ‘splainin’ to do.

    10. #10 |  Marty | 

      Seymour Hersh is a true badass. My Lai would’ve been an unsubstantiated rumor without his reporting. Too bad the rest of the criminals were never brought to justice.

      it seems most of the US reporters covering the wars now are cheerleaders for the soldiers and misguided govt programs (poppy eradication, etc). critical reporting is immediately discredited….

    11. #11 |  James D | 

      Thanks a lot Radley (notalwaysright.com) … now I have another site I’m going to have to look at every day along with engrish.com and awkwardfamilyphotos.com :)

    12. #12 |  J sub D | 

      Seymour Hersh is a true badass. My Lai would’ve been an unsubstantiated rumor without his reporting. Too bad the rest of the criminals were never brought to justice.

      You want My Lai badass? Warrant Officer Hugh Thompson Jr.

    13. #13 |  jppatter | 

      Every time I read another story about the ridiculous numbers of people discharged for “telling” under the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” lunacy I ask the same question – how many people have been discharged for Asking? It’s partly a joke, but partly a serious question. Have any hetero service members ever been expelled for Asking?

    14. #14 |  Ben | 

      In reference to the Notalwaysright link, I have to wonder how many of the really, really stupid ones are set-ups that the clerk didn’t realize even after the fact.

    15. #15 |  Michael Chaney | 

      Every time I read another story about the ridiculous numbers of people discharged for “telling” under the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” lunacy I ask the same question – how many people have been discharged for Asking?

      How many southern whites were denied the right to vote due to non-payment of poll taxes during the Jim Crow era?

    16. #16 |  parse | 

      Are any of the people pissed off about the release of the Lockerbie bomber upset that Calley was freed after serving only a fraction of his sentence?

    17. #17 |  Tim C | 

      God story – funny that the URL ends with “jesusmaryandjoseph,” which is more or less the expression I came up with (I think it was actually the JHFC one, but whatever) when I saw the headline!

    18. #18 |  BamBam | 

      Are any of the people pissed off about the release of the Lockerbie bomber upset that Calley was freed after serving only a fraction of his sentence?

      Shut up! Calley was on Team USA, and Lockerbie guy attacked Team USA (I’m sure someone has attempted to make a connection). USA! USA! USA!

    19. #19 |  Highway | 

      Radley, the story about Fehrenbach seems to indicate that he was on track to receive an honorable discharge, not a dishonorable. The lowlife who falsely accused and worked so hard to out him is who was pushing for dishonorable. The officer board recommended honorable.

      Perhaps someone who is more familiar with it can say how likely it is that the recommendation would be ignored and the discharge made dishonorable, but it seems that your summary sentence is a bit more inflammatory than usual.

    20. #20 |  Pseudonymous Coward | 

      @Highway:

      My discharge was honorable, though, as an enlisted man who had only served 3 years of his first 4-year enlistment, I certainly didn’t receive a payout of $80,000 for my time.

      Usually, discharges for DADT violations are either honorable or general under honorable conditions. This Shaner guy seems to be a vindictive individual who has no understanding of how the military actually works; it’s extremely unlikely that he’ll be given a dishonorable or bad-conduct discharge for this.

    21. #21 |  troy | 

      I learned at bettybower.com, america’s best christian, that, according to Deuteronomy, if you rape a virgin, your punishments is that you have to pay the father 50 shekels and marry the raped no-longer-virgin.

    22. #22 |  Cynical in CA | 

      “Physicist claims to have discovered why time only moves in one direction.”

      Here is what Lorenzo Maccone wrote:

      “The arrow-of-time dilemma states that the laws of physics are invariant for time inversion, whereas the familiar phenomena we see everyday are not (i.e., entropy increases). I show that, within a quantum mechanical framework, all phenomena which leave a trail of information behind (and hence can be studied by physics) are those where entropy necessarily increases or remains constant. All phenomena where the entropy decreases must not leave any information of their having happened. This situation is completely indistinguishable from their not having happened at all. In the light of this observation, the second law of thermodynamics is reduced to a mere tautology: physics cannot study those processes where entropy has decreased, even if they were commonplace.”

      So, if something leaves no informational record of its existence, one can prove it existed because one cannot prove it existed?

      WTF? Where’s the proof of entropy-decreasing events? Anyway, I guess he’s discussing the quantum level of the universe, not exactly relevant to day-to-day life.

      I was watching an interesting program on SciFi last night relating to black holes and Hawking and his backtracking on the destruction of information. It seems to have been proved that information cannot be destroyed in black holes as Hawking alleged — information is preserved on the event horizon. So too it must be with entropy-decreasing events — not possible.

      I’ll wait for the peer review.

    23. #23 |  Cynical in CA | 

      Troy, for more greatest hits of the Bible, visit

      http://whydoesgodhateamputees.com/all-videos.htm

      The most thorough destruction of Christianity I’ve ever read.

    24. #24 |  Helmut O' Hooligan | 

      #12 J sub D: “You want My Lai badass? Warrant Officer Hugh Thompson Jr”

      Excellent job, J sub D. Mr. Thompson was a definite badass, and a true American hero!

      I was familiar with Thompson’s story, and it occurred to me that we need more people like Thompson in law enforcement. As a criminal justice student who has looked into police employment, I think that this is the kind of heroism we need in our police departments if things are ever going to change for the better.

      Thanks for the reminder, J

    25. #25 |  James D | 

      troy, she can’t be the ‘best christian’ if she is quoting law from the Old Testament … just saying …..

    26. #26 |  ParatrooperJJ | 

      First of all he is getting an honorable discharge. Dishonorable discharges can only be given by conviction of a general court martial and only to enlisted service members. Officers can get a dismissal upon GCM conviction. Secondly he violated the UCMJ by having gay sex. Thirdly, he has been in long enough to have signed background investigation paperwork that asked about his sexuality. Since he was commissioned, he must have lied on that paperwork which is a felony. So I have little sympathy for his situation. He is lucky that he is not facing court martial for his actions.

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