All Press Is Good Press

Saturday, August 22nd, 2009

Whole Foods stock closed at its highest price in a year on Friday.

It’s up 4 points since CEO John Mackey’s op-ed in the Wall Street Journal.

I had breakfast at the Whole Foods in Old Town today. Delicious made-to-order omelet. Chicken, bacon, sun-dried tomatoes, and cheddar. No one thinks to put chicken in an omelet. It’s the mother and child reunion.

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34 Responses to “All Press Is Good Press”

  1. #1 |  Reggie Hubbard | 

    I’ve been putting last night’s grilled chicken into the next morning’s omelets since before I’ve been smoking pot.

    p.s. Salsa is the best topping for omelets.

  2. #2 |  Eric | 

    salsa and eggs meet in the perfect union known as a breakfast burrito. Whole Foods has a great deli too, good for lunch.

  3. #3 |  cb | 

    This is what keeps the professionals on the Street smiling, when even intelligent people don’t understand what drives the market. Whole Foods stock price has nothing to do with Mackey’s op-ed. The entire market (DOW or S&P) is up the same percentage during this time frame. That said, I’m off pick up one of their tasty rotisserie chickens.

  4. #4 |  skunky | 

    Yes, because the health care debate in this country should be comandeered by corporate CEOs on op-ed pages. Publius he is not.

    Your counter-boycott is reminiscent of the 101st Fighting Keyboarders of Iraq War fame, fashioning themselves warriors for the liberation of Iraq (which didn’t ask to be liberated) without contributing a thing other than snarky comment and decals on their bumper saying “I support the troops”.

  5. #5 |  K. Wilson | 

    Wow, I had no clue *anybody* actually thought that John Mackey “commandeered” the health care debate. Looks like some people are feeling a little bitter and defeated.

    What great news.

  6. #6 |  Helmut O' Hooligan | 

    #4 Skunky: “Your counter-boycott is reminiscent of the 101st Fighting Keyboarders of Iraq War fame, fashioning themselves warriors for the liberation of Iraq (which didn’t ask to be liberated…”

    Hilarious. Let me guess, you are trying to conflate libertarians like Radley with Neocons. How original. I take it you are inspired by Naomi Klein’s joyous kicking of Milton Friedman’s corpse.

    Skunky, my economic views are somewhat left of center, thus I don’t necessarily agree with the views expressed on healthcare in this forum. But really, you aren’t even trying to have a debate. You are just parrotting the same old left-populist snark and showing us that you know nothing about political theory. Neoconservatives don’t care about individual autonomy or liberalism. They worship state power, at least when it is in Republican hands. Balko is NOT a neocon, nor was Friedman. End of story.

  7. #7 |  Lior | 

    Doesn’t the old commandment “you shall not cook a baby goat in its mother’s milk” encompass chicken omelets as well?

  8. #8 |  Bob | 

    Heh.

    Radley, they don’t put the Layers in the omelet, because Layers are bred to spend all their energy making eggs, the meat tends to be … well, tough.

    The chickens that are destined for the table, the Broilers (or Roasters), are separated out as chicks, they’re also typically male.

    As such, the likelihood of you getting an omelet with the meat from a chicken that also laid the eggs is infinitesimal.

  9. #9 |  Les | 

    Yes, because the health care debate in this country should be comandeered by corporate CEOs on op-ed pages.

    Opening with a strawman is a poor way to convince people to listen to you.

    Besides the fact that Radley, like most libertarians (and unlike most Democrats) opposed the invasion of Iraq, I hope you don’t think that boycotting a company simply because its CEO voiced a polite opinion disagreeing with the President and offering alternative solutions to what he agrees is a serious problem is any different or more useful than the useless actions of the “101st Fighting Keyboarders.”

  10. #10 |  Mister DNA | 

    Your counter-boycott is reminiscent of the 101st Fighting Keyboarders of Iraq War fame, fashioning themselves warriors for the liberation of Iraq (which didn’t ask to be liberated) without contributing a thing other than snarky comment and decals on their bumper saying “I support the troops”.

    For god’s sake, Yakov Smirnoff has fresher material than this.

  11. #11 |  greenish | 

    Doesn’t the old commandment “you shall not cook a baby goat in its mother’s milk” encompass chicken omelets as well?

    It’s kosher if you can bear to not add dairy to the omelet.

    On topic, the boycott only started a week ago – I think the stock price is telling us what investors think of the boycott, rather than how it’ll be going. Of course, the investors are probably right…

  12. #12 |  Andrew Williams | 

    I’ve had breakfast on several occasions at the Whole Foods in Tustin, CA while waiting for my car to be checked out. It’s a good deal: you eat as much or as little as you’re willing to pay for. Then, if I’m up to it, a stroll across the mall to Borders, to a comfy chair and a good read. I should take my car in more often. ; )

  13. #13 |  hamburglar007 | 

    i prefer the french style omelet, no fillers and just a little runny. The whole foods omelets are pretty fantastic though. I was dissappointed when they stopped serving cheese grits in the morning.

  14. #14 |  David Leahy | 

    Well, no one seems to be commenting on the central issue, so I’ll take a shot at it.

    The CEO of Whole Foods, who appeared to be progressive on so many issues, doesn’t believe that all Americans should have some access to health care unless they have a fine paying job that happens to provide health insurance (with profits going to the health insurer).

    This is a dickwad position.

    I think we should all be agreed on this.

  15. #15 |  John Markley | 

    ‘Yes, because the health care debate in this country should be comandeered by corporate CEOs on op-ed pages.”

    It’s terribly difficult to take liberal complaints about how people like the town hall meeting protesters are preventing debate and discussion seriously when they make it so clear that they regard ANY meaningful disagreement with liberal demands as inherently illegitimate. Expressing an opinion in a newspaper constitutes comandeering the debate? Good thing he didn’t manage to make an appearance on television, or you’d probably be screaming about how he had deposed Obama in a military coup, crowned himself Emperor, and sent his elite stormtroopers into the Capitol building to force the Senate to declare him a god.

  16. #16 |  James | 

    There has been counter protests. Michelle Malkin is encouraging everyone to shop there also some sheets of great things mackey does for his company and the community made a lot of protesters change their mind on who to support.

    Mackey is a pretty amazing guy from what they say. A real humanitarian no matter what your political belief.

  17. #17 |  Helmut O' Hooligan | 

    #14 John Markley: “It’s terribly difficult to take liberal complaints about how people like the town hall meeting protesters are preventing debate and discussion seriously when they make it so clear that they regard ANY meaningful disagreement with liberal demands as inherently illegitimate”

    In my opinion, Skunky is not a liberal. He is a progressive. And I think that by the end of the Obama administration, the difference between liberals and progressives will become pretty apparent. Progressives are far more committed to government intervention in economic AND social matters than a liberal like myself. But perhaps I see it this way because I have gone back to the roots of liberalism (classical liberalism) in many ways, though as I mentioned above, I tend to lean a bit left-of-center in my economic views. The next 4 to 8 years could be interesting for political theory geeks.

  18. #18 |  anarch | 

    An Ethiopian recipe bakes eggs inside chicken.

    I would consider buying something at Whole Foods this week just on principle.

  19. #19 |  McCleary | 

    CB — what are you talking about? Instead of saying “(DOW or S&P) is up the same percentage during this time frame” could you show your work?

    Because WFMI is up about 16% from Aug. 4 to Aug 21 — from roughly 24.8 to 28.8. Now go check the Dow and S&P in the same period — about 2% or so, right? Are talking about the Dow and S&P also hitting a 52-week high? Well, wrong again. Both hit peaks last August before the crash, and are well below that high.

    The biggest reason WFMI is up is because Aug. 4 they reported a strong quarter. You can see the spike. But the real story here is that Street is not shaken by the boycott, and the stock continues to hold at around 27/28, reaching its best close in 52 weeks. Even Mackey sold 50,000 shares Aug 6 (http://www.gurufocus.com/news.php?id=63452) maybe suspecting a drop — he should have held on.

    If boycotters had the courage of their convictions and thought the boycott was working, they would short WFMI and make some money watching decreasing profits drive the stock down.

    Instead they (and some journalists) are basing the “success” of boycott on the ridiculous metric of 22k fans in their Facebook Boycott group. Last time I looked, the commitment to join a Facebook group was to click on one button.

  20. #20 |  Cornellian | 

    I’ve been saying it for years – yes their food is sometimes expensive, but it’s also very good. Their sandwich counter is excellent.

  21. #21 |  Kevin | 

    David Leahy | August 22nd, 2009 at 8:08 pm
    “The CEO of Whole Foods, who appeared to be progressive on so many issues, doesn’t believe that all Americans should have some access to health care unless they have a fine paying job that happens to provide health insurance (with profits going to the health insurer).

    This is a dickwad position.

    I think we should all be agreed on this.”

    No, we don’t all agree on this. That’s the point. Healthcare is not a Right. If you feel that you are morally obligated to pay for healthcare for any and all that either won’t or can’t pay for it, then I suggest you organize with like-minded people and you can all empty your wallets to your conscience’s content. Liberty demands that you leave alone those who don’t agree with you. That means keep the government out of it.

  22. #22 |  Kevin | 

    In the spirit of All Press is Good Press, did anyone notice the banner adds for law enforcement training on theagitator.com home page? It says “Justice Pays”. I’m guessing Mr. Balko does not have much control over the add content.

  23. #23 |  Bernard | 

    Coop in Panic as Homicidal Lunatic Eats Mother and Child at Family Reunion. Shocking pictures on pages 2, 3, 5, 7-18 and in the cooking section on page 6.

  24. #24 |  K. Wilson | 

    John Markley said: “Good thing he didn’t manage to make an appearance on television, or you’d probably be screaming about how he had deposed Obama in a military coup, crowned himself Emperor, and sent his elite stormtroopers into the Capitol building to force the Senate to declare him a god.”

    Actually, I saw Mackey on John Stossel talking about his ideas for reform ages ago, which is why I was so shocked at the left’s reaction to the WSJ piece. It was old news to me. :)

    Mackey on Stossel can be found on Youtube.

  25. #25 |  skunky | 

    I’m glad everyone here has pigeon-holed me as a liberal, progressive, or whatever. At least you’ve all stopped calling me names.

    I have libertarian leanings, as well as a healthy portion of progressiveness (in the Teddy Roosevelt mold).

    Any time someone finds themselves on the same side of an issue with batshit crazy Michelle Malkin you should examine your position quite closely.

    As for the heath care “debate”, I’d like to understand the libertarian argument for taking government out of health care. I didn’t know we were all for trading the tyranny of government for the tyranny of private health insurance companies. Of course, if government wasn’t involved, there would be a lot less people needing health care, since they’d have died of things like polio and smallpox before they became a serious burden. Should we eliminate the requirement for emergency rooms to treat people regardless of their ability to pay? Seems like unnecessary government intrusion there too.

    This is why I have trouble being an ideological purist when it comes to libertarianism. If you go all the way down that road you end up in morally indefensible positions.

    And my point about “comandeering” wasn’t that anyone who disagrees with the “liberal” position on health care (whatever that is) should be put to the guillotine, but rather that maybe he’s not exactly an expert on health care policy. And there is a veritable army of highly-paid talking heads who are all over every TV news program shilling for the private insurance industry. So I’m not crying wolf here about the ability for the anti-reform crew to get their message out.

    My views on the subject are as follows: as a small buisiness owner, providing health insurance to my employees costs 20% more every single year if I don’t raise deducitibles and cut coverage. And this is not sustainable. And what good do insurance companies do anyway? They get in the way of care (I can’t see that doctor since he’s not in the “network”) and return massive profits to their shareholders. And this is an industry that basically did not exist a few decades ago.

    So basically, I’m all for single-payer national health insurance. And not listening to people who believe that an incremental step like having a viable public option is tatamount to Nazism or Soviet-style gulags.

  26. #26 |  skunky | 

    A good view on the people like Betsy McCaughey who somehow get to frame the entire debate on the issue:

    http://jmhm.livejournal.com/1781035.html

  27. #27 |  John Mackey = Awesome at Chicks On The Right | 

    [...] because all press is good press, the stock price of Whole Foods has risen 4 points since Mackey’s article was published.  Take that, facebook crybabies. Share and [...]

  28. #28 |  Les | 

    Skunky, #25 is not unreasonable. But the point is that Mackey’s op-ed wasn’t unreasonable, either. He was simply arguing that there are ways to provide healthcare to everyone, with less government. The response to his arguments from those opposed was no less shrill than the response from people like Malkin. Both sides of this debate are filled with reflexive ideologues, uninterested in the concerns of the other.

    And there’s no evidence that Betsy McCaughey is framing this debate any more than Paul Krugman. They’re both making their points on a national stage.

    Personally, I’d like to see a system where no one who is insured goes bankrupt because of an illness, and no one who isn’t insured dies because of it. I have no idea as to what the best way is to do that, but I think we should look at countries like The Netherlands, France, and Switzerland (which, I believe, use a combination of public and private insurance) and attempt to implement similar programs at regional levels (anything implemented nationally through D.C. is certain to be horribly inefficient and corrupt). But I admit to being fairly ignorant as to what will “work” and what won’t.

    Finally, in what way was Teddy Roosevelt “progressive?” He was pretty clearly a war-mongering racist, who Mark Twain described, after meeting him, as “quite clearly insane.”

    But I digress.

  29. #29 |  de stijl | 

    It’s up 4 points since CEO John Mackey’s op-ed in the Wall Street Journal.

    It’s obviously because of the counter-boycotters.

    Dicslaimer: Counter-boycotters make my dick hard.

  30. #30 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    “This is a dickwad position.”

    At least David recognizes the correct label of his position.

  31. #31 |  Jeffrey Quick | 

    “The CEO of Whole Foods, who appeared to be progressive on so many issues, doesn’t believe that all Americans should have some access to health care …”

    Lie. Mackey believes Americans should have the same access to health care that they have to food, housing, gasoline, Internet and anything else important.

  32. #32 |  Danny | 

    Radley, can I give Jeffrey Quick @ #31 +100 karma?

  33. #33 |  skunky | 

    False equivalency – Betsy McCaughey vs. Paul Krugman.

    Can you seriously say that this detritus of NY State Republicans is at all qualified to expound on health care? See my link of how she’s taken any position (and apparently ANY position) to further her wallet. Krugman’s been ideologically consistent on this issue, from what I can tell.

    I take issue with the statement: “anything implemented nationally through D.C. is certain to be horribly inefficient and corrupt”. That’s a pretty broad statement, don’t you think? Should we decentralize our armed forces? As a New Yorker, the prospect of our state government fucking things up is a lot scarier than Washington doing it.

  34. #34 |  Drunkenatheist | 

    Just saw this related link. According to Mashable.com, supposedly WF’s brand perception is dropping:

    http://mashable.com/2009/08/24/whole-foods-brand-perception/

    In light of everything I’ve read from those of us opposing socialized health care, as well as your original post, I find it terribly difficult to believe that this is truly the case.

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