Lunch Links

Thursday, July 23rd, 2009
  • Great correction from the NY Times.
  • Slate‘s “Explainer” runs down the issues involved with the Gates arrest.
  • Here’s a more thoughtful stab at my challenge to the left.
  • Another Moscow critic ends up dead.
  • Illinois state guardian agency sues two sheriff’s deputies for needless tasering two teens. The comments allege far more serious abuses.
  • I was planning to vote for the pro-gun, low-tax Democrat over the law-and-order Republican in the Virginia gubernatorial election this year. Our last two governors (Warner and Kaine) were centrist Democrats, and did a pretty good job. But this may make me change my mind.
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  • 56 Responses to “Lunch Links”

    1. #1 |  Cynical in CA | 

      “Great correction from the NY Times.”

      The NYTimes — proving its irrelevance since 1920 … at least.

      “Slate’s “Explainer” runs down the issues involved with the Gates arrest.”

      The longer this Gates thing drags out, the more I’m inclined to believe it was staged by Gates. He’s definitely smart enough to pull it off and he’s obviously a true believer in racism.

      “I was planning to vote …”

      For the love of everything worthwhile in this world, including self-respect, please DO NOT VOTE!!!

    2. #2 |  Anon | 

      http://abcnews.go.com/US/story?id=8146466

      Looking forward to your take on this, Radley.

    3. #3 |  Dave W. | 

      Payano case:

      http://www.jsonline.com/news/milwaukee/51322527.html

    4. #4 |  dubdedork | 

      Hey Balko, you missed one.

      Cop sodomizes man with taser, zaps him, then threatens to taser his balls. Police chief says ‘these are good officers’

      http://www.2news.tv/news/local/51404747.html

      audio recording of event available.

    5. #5 |  Laertes | 

      Good for McDonnell. I’m more Liberal than Libertarian, which is to say I’ll differ with a Libertarian about the proper limits of the state’s role in the marketplace, but even to me this one’s a no-brainer. The state is better at providing infrastructure the use of which is difficult or impractical to meter (roads & highways, etc), institutions for the public good (police & armies, social security), or both (health insurance.)

      But the government stinks at both retail and the provision of vices. Take gambling, for instance: The private sector produces Bellagio. The public sector produces scratch & win tickets. Retail businesses have to be exquisitely sensitive to signals from consumers. This is notoriously not a strength of state-run enterprises. I won’t deny that there are some public-health and public-safety issues related to alcohol, but they’re far too small to justify a state monopoly at the point of retail.

      Short version: I, a partisan Democrat, might conceivably vote for a Republican who favored ending a state monopoly on liquor sales. (And I’d absolutely vote for a Republican who favored legalizing pot over a Democrat who didn’t.)

    6. #6 |  Dave | 

      I don’t believe McDonnell can put tolls on the interstate, for the same reason that the rest areas will be closed rather than have commercial operations in them, the FegGov paid for the construction and they don’t allow tolls on their roads.

    7. #7 |  Cynical in CA | 

      “Here’s a more thoughtful stab at my challenge to the left.”

      Whatfuckingever.

      Violence piled on top of ignorance sandwiched in between superstition and fear.

    8. #8 |  Pablo | 

      “If he answers no, you are being detained, which means he must acknowledge and abide by your full range of civil rights, including Miranda warnings.” (To paraphrase)

      Uh, no. Under Terry v. Ohio and its progeny, police are allowed to conduct “investigatory stops,” aka “brief detentions,” which means that the subject is neither under arrest nor free to leave. Police can briefly detain someone (up to about 20 minutes or so) to investigate when they have some articulable suspicion, but less than probable cause, to believe a crime is being committed or has been committed. Not surprisingly, lots of civil rights abuses occur during these “intermediate level encounters,” as you are not free to leave but because you are not under arrest, Miranda and the right to an attorney are not yet triggerred.

    9. #9 |  Zeb | 

      “the FegGov paid for the construction and they don’t allow tolls on their roads.”

      There are several interstate highways that I know of where there are tolls (collected by the state). Also, I believe that interstates are maintained and managed by the states that contain them (with significant federal funding).

    10. #10 |  adolphus | 

      “The longer this Gates thing drags out, the more I’m inclined to believe it was staged by Gates. He’s definitely smart enough to pull it off and he’s obviously a true believer in racism.”

      I vaguely recall someone in Texas purposely turning on heat lamps to lure in cops illegally using heat sensing equipment to gain warrants. Everyone here thought it was righteous and a hoot. Assuming Gates did set this up, and I am not saying he did, but lets suppose, why would that justify anything the cop did or did not do? Maybe Gates’ media ubiquity is unique and annoying, but wouldn’t all the victims of police misconduct covered at this site love to have that pedestal to keep the case in the public eye. We may wish the public cared as much about Shem Walker as they do about Gates or the Mayor of Berwyn Heights, but we know they don’t.

      And I am not an expert on African-American scholars but my impression of Gates over the years, verified by the comments I have read on more radical African-American periodicals, is that Gates is not the rabid race baiter many portray him as. He is actually considered more accommodationist among A-A scholars than confrontationalist. More Booker T. Washington than W.E.B. DuBois. He’s not Michael Steele, but he’s no Al Sharpton either. Even if he were more Al Sharpton, so what? People who agitate for better police can’t always pick blond, blue-eyed sympathetic heroes. The cop was wrong and if Gates baited him, maybe the Cambridge police need to think about how easily they were baited.

    11. #11 |  Mike | 

      Regarding the Gates explanations, Wouldn’t the officer have probable cause in this case? The facts that I have heard stipulated from both sides are

      1) Gates had been on vacation
      2) His front door was stuck so he had to pry it open.
      3) This was witnessed by a pedestrian.

      So under these circumstances I could see probable cause to at least determine who was in the house. So perhaps Gates wouldn’t have to show ID but I’d expect if he didn’t the officer couldn’t just let the situation stand. I would suspect if somebody sees me attempting to break into my own house I would normally be pleased/embarrased that the cops are called.

      That aside a disorderly conduct charge does seem pretty silly. Charges of racial bias are also perhaps uncalled for at this time as well.

      This seems like one of those stories where we will never really know what happened.

    12. #12 |  Dave Krueger | 

      Wait. Isn’t it immoral when private companies sell booze?

      On an unrelated note, CBS news had a segment about teen prostitution last night, waving around huge numbers in the hundreds of thousands. I switched channels when they started lamenting about how it was becoming more and more underground. Well, duh?

      As might be guessed, the concept of legalizing adult prostitution didn’t meet the threshold required to be worthy of mention.

      Which mainstream party stands up for women’s rights? Which one wants to keep government out of the bedroom? Which one wants to protect kids? I keep forgetting.

      Sorry. The story hit one of my buttons.

    13. #13 |  Damnthatde | 

      I always hated buying liqour when I was in Virginia because it was all state ran. There was no competition and the selection was limited. Plus I always felt like big brother was tracking what I was doing. Hopefully he get his way and welcome back some free market there.

    14. #14 |  Boyd Durkin | 

      Madness! How on Earth could the free market provide booze to the public?

      Your faith in these free market solutions knows no bounds.

    15. #15 |  Mike | 

      Peter Moskos has a great piece on this over on his blog, Cop in the Hood. Long story short, if a cop ever asks you to come outside and talk, it’s a trick to nab you on an obstruction. Stay right where you are.

    16. #16 |  j.d. | 

      I just want to say I find it funny that Gates was calling Crowley a racist well before the point in time that Gates was arrested for disorderly conduct (the only, ONLY point in the sequence of events that could point to ‘racist motives’).

      Also, on that tip, if Crowley was acting on racist motives, why did he wait so long to arrest Gates? Why did he take that verbal abuse for so long, and in front of other officers and neighbors?

    17. #17 |  Dave Krueger | 

      #9 Mike

      Regarding the Gates explanations, Wouldn’t the officer have probable cause in this case?

      That’s what I was thinking, as well. What if the cop left without verifying who the guy was and it did turn out to be a burglar? We’d all be talking about how dumb he was and how he probably just wanted to get the heck out of there so he could go back to wrong houses raids using warrants based on false information.

    18. #18 |  Mike | 

      Why didn’t he just leave after he found out that Gates owned the house? Why did he deliberately bait him into coming outside, which as Moskos notes, was the only way eh could arrest him?

    19. #19 |  Mike | 

      Why didn’t the cop present him with his ID card as Massachusetts law requires?

    20. #20 |  MichaelK42 | 

      The Cambridge officer was just broadcast on CNN stating that he was the only officer there… ?

      “Gates’ lawyer, fellow Harvard scholar Charles Ogletree, said his client showed his driver’s license and Harvard ID — both with his photos — and repeatedly asked for the name and badge number of the officer, who refused. He followed the officer onto the front porch as he left his house and was arrested there.”

      But on CNN the officer claims Gates only showed him his Harvard ID “that didn’t have his address on it” or something.

      These things do not add up.

    21. #21 |  BamBam | 

      To the more thoughtful stab: inflation isn’t a hard concept to understand. 1) Government prints money, which increases debt that is sold to “investors” (mainly foreign governments, so they own our debt and may some day expect repayment); 2) devalues the existing money supply (more of something makes them all worth less); 3) hurts the poorest people the most because things will cost more because of 2) and thus making them even worse off – the middle class gets by but is slowly having a more difficult time getting ahead. Unless inflation is calculated accurately AND you get raises to compensate it + merit raise, then you are slowly being SCREWED.

      There are many more points, but those are the basics that anyone should be able to understand and agree with. Because of 3), then “the left” should be the most angry because they supposedly empathize and understand the poor.

    22. #22 |  MichaelK42 | 

      Also, the cop claimed that “he was reaching for his ID card” but for some reason didn’t show it and that he asked Gates to step outside for his “safety” because he didn’t know if anyone else was in the house.

      Yeah. Sure.

    23. #23 |  j.d. | 

      #20 – from what I’ve read, I thought the initial call said ‘2’ people were seen around the house

    24. #24 |  BamBam | 

      We’re talking moral imperatives now: how much of that hard-earned money should a rich man be able to keep? Remember, though, that most super-rich aren’t really making that much off their income. Rather, the increase in value in their investments and property would keep them high on the hog even if we took much more of their income.

      Amazing how taking someone else’s income is glossed over, as it was no big deal. “Even if we TOOK much more of their income”. WTF? I want to take some of this person’s belongings and see how much it is appreciated — all in the name of government, of course, so I can redistribute it as I see fit.

    25. #25 |  Cynical in CA | 

      #8 | adolphus — “Assuming Gates did set this up, and I am not saying he did, but lets suppose, why would that justify anything the cop did or did not do?”

      Heavens no, it doesn’t justify the cops actions from a purely moral standpoint. But given the fucked up society in which we live where certain individuals are tasked as State agents with the power to kill in the name of the State, the cop’s actions are consistent with that directive.

      It is the twisted carnival dance of racism on both sides.

    26. #26 |  Marty | 

      from the ‘more thoughtful stab…’-

      ‘The dirty little secret of the entitlement programs – Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid – is that they work pretty well. They’re just not funded well.’

      of course they’re ‘not funded well’. neither are the schools, police departments, military, etc, and they all work ‘pretty well’. and they never will be ‘funded well’.

      ‘more thoughtful’ doesn’t mean it’s worth a damn.

    27. #27 |  adolphus | 

      @j.d. #14 “Also, on that tip, if Crowley was acting on racist motives, why did he wait so long to arrest Gates? Why did he take that verbal abuse for so long, and in front of other officers and neighbors?”

      I can think of two reasons.

      1. The whole point was to take verbal abuse in front of witnesses. When just in the house and in front of no one there is no potential to incite others to action which is needed to arrest for disorderly conduct.

      2. The cop wanted to embarrass him. The whole point behind arresting someone for contempt of cop is to humiliate and inconvenience them. To do that you need a perp walk and photos. Otherwise what’s the point?

      I can also turn your question around. If it wasn’t racially motivated, why did the cop put up with the abuse so long? Why didn’t he just walk away, get into his car, and drive away? Once he established Gates was the owner of the house that’s all he needed to do. But he didn’t did he. He manipulated the situation to get Gates outside to arrest him.

      I would also point out that the racial overtones of this incident start before the cops showed up. I have been locked out of my house lots of times and had to force my way in. No one ever calls the cops on me and I probably looked twice as raggedy as Gates, except for that whole being white thing.

      I must say I have never seen so many commenters here work so hard to defend and justify cop over reach. I wonder why?

      Just to cleanse everyone’s pallet Ta-Nihisi Coates posted this story last night.

      http://www.policeone.com/investigations/articles/1857461-Store-video-catches-Philly-cop-confronting-woman/

      Young, pretty, blond, and white. Now here is a victim of police brutality we all can get behind.

    28. #28 |  j.d. | 

      one last comment – of the voluminous posts made by Radley as archived on his website regarding to police abuse and abuse of powers, this Gates situation, to me, is watered-down weak-sauce by comparison.

      Then again, perhaps I’m so desensitized that such an incident does not even get a tick on the give-a-damn-o-meter.

    29. #29 |  Mojopin | 

      I would hate to be accused of making an “emotional” argument here, but I have to. On the “challenge response”, the writer makes a statement that I have heard over and over again that is like fingernails on a chalkboard to me. To paraphrase:

      “I don’t care what you tax the upper 1% because, quite frankly, I’m not in that tax bracket and could care less. They’ll have enough left over for me not to worry.”

      Obama used the same type of trash in the campaign “vote for me because I am going to give a tax cut to 95% of the population.”

      What about the other 5%? No need to worry about them, they aren’t you and they’ll still be fine.

      Perhaps I am hypersensitive about this because I have a family member who is in that top 1%, and he does just fine. I don’t begrudge him or am even envious of him. He has taken more risks that I ever will and has been successful. He is terribly bright and quite frankly, works more hours and deals with more stress than I care to take on.

      I guess my problem is, for all of the “empathy” that the left talks about — wouldn’t it be demoralizing if you were in the shoes of the upper 1% and you knew that out of every hour you worked, you were only going to get paid for 15 minutes? Where’s the f*cking empathy? Sure they have money left over, but at the end of the day they still aren’t receiving just compensation for the full work that they do.

      Also too, can someone give me one good reason to have ANY corporate tax rate since it just gets passed on to consumers at the end of the day?

    30. #30 |  Mojopin | 

      @#24

      Agree 100%. I could come up with some pretty well-conceived plans so long as I don’t have to worry about paying for them.

      Geez,,,where’s the challenge?

    31. #31 |  j.d. | 

      adolphus – maybe we can get behind that ‘pretty (your opinion) blond and white” girl because, uh, an officer came out of nowhere and put a gun to her neck?

      Further, I find it curious that you’re coming up with all sorts of ulterior motives for a cop responding to a B & E call. “manipulating” a person to lure him outside? This reminds me of the Dana Carvey sketch on “OJ” –> “we gotta get that sonovabitch”

      I’m also amused that you suggest ‘racial overtones’ (whatever post-modern nonsense that is supposed to mean) began by a person walking down the street see’s an unknown person trying to jimmy his way into a house. Somehow this becomes racist because Gates is black. Not because it appeared someone was breaking into the house.

      Hopefully you’ll stop being a racist and look at the world from a non-race perspective.

    32. #32 |  Mojopin | 

      One last bit about the challenge response. In the section regarding wealth inequity, he doesn’t mind the inequity so long as there is upward mobility. On this, I agree with him. However, and I have seen this in the left more than anywhere else, when he gets to funding social security, his plan is redistributive, but because he doesn’t use the word “redistributive” it isn’t redistributive and therefore, he doesn’t have a problem with what he is doing.

      So long as we don’t call it what it is, it isn’t what you want to call it. He learned it by watching politicians.

    33. #33 |  Fluffy | 

      “manipulating” a person to lure him outside?

      I actually don’t think Crowley’s motives were racist – it was just run of the mill cop arrogance.

      That being said, I absolutely conclude from the police report that Crowley BS’d Gates to get him to come outside so he could concoct a disorderly conduct charge. Not because Gates is black, but because Crowley felt Gates hadn’t shown him the proper respect and had to be taught a lesson.

    34. #34 |  Aresen | 

      ‘The dirty little secret of the entitlement programs – Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid – is that they work pretty well. They’re just not funded well.’

      This can also be expressed as “We’ve fallen 90 floors, but haven’t hit the pavement yet. I’m sure we’ll find a way to fix gravity before we hit.”

    35. #35 |  Dave Krueger | 

      LOL! Aresen, you have made my day on more than one occasion.

    36. #36 |  Mister DNA | 

      RE the Gates/Crowley case: It really sucks that it’s being framed as a race issue. Long-time Agitator readers surely know that cops see us “civilians” as one color, and it’s NOT blue.

      Martin Luther King would be so happy. From his “I Have A Dream” speech:

      There are those who are asking the devotees of civil rights, “When will you be satisfied?” We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the victim of the unspeakable horrors of police brutality.

      Thanks to the “New Professionalism”, police brutality isn’t just for poor black people anymore.

    37. #37 |  Highway | 

      There’s no prohibition from putting tolls on Interstates, even ones built with federal money. Toll roads can even be built with federal money…

    38. #38 |  MacGregory | 

      When egos clash, the cop always wins the first battle. And usually, depending on who you are, wins the second and third as well.

    39. #39 |  Eyewitness | 

      Come on Radley, just drive into DC and go to Central Liquor like everyone else in Northern Virginia.

    40. #40 |  MacGregory | 

      I rarely threadjack but this was just too much:

      WVa cop accused of misconduct in traffic stops

      Fifteen people are suing a Reedsville police officer with allegations of criminal misconduct that includes illegal searches and arrests, fabrication of evidence and excessive use of force.

      …Daff sexually humiliated him by forcing him to pull down his shorts, then jump up and down while Daff tugged the waistband of his underwear.

      http://www.dailymail.com/News/200907231285

    41. #41 |  Warren | 

      Says Laertes: —-The state is better at providing infrastructure the use of which is difficult or impractical to meter (roads & highways, etc), institutions for the public good (police & armies, social security), or both (health insurance.)——-

      Yeah, roads…wow.

      Just what is it about strips of asphalt that only government can provide and or charge for their use? Do you have ANY PROOF at all to back up your assertion?

      37, 313 people died in 08 (the lowest total since 1961) on the US socialist road system. Is that price worth it? How is this “better”? Would it be more or less if the roads were privately owned?

      Police? Armies? Any proof we are better off with these institutions? Is there no other way to provide security services?

      Social Security? Health Insurance? Is it impossible for individuals to provide these for themselves?

      Maybe if taxes were not so fucking high people would have an easier time of it. Plus mercantalist and other mulcting regulations add so much to the cost of health care that people have this idea that health care is innately expensive.

      Really what you and other collectivists are saying is: “I can’t imagine how X can be done without using the state’s monopoly on violence, therefore it can’t be done!”

      It’s a good thing we didn’t have to wait for you folks to figure out a way to eat at a place other than our home, a way to clean ourselves in our home, a way to travel from city to city in effortless comfort, a way for audio signals to travel to individuals for purposes of communication and entertainment, a way to keep our clothes clean without leaving our homes, a way for audio and visual signals combined to be available to individuals, a system to supply us with all the things our pets might need, some way to provide printed information everyday for a low cost, some way to make individualized travel possible, some way to provide for personalized defense of home and family,…….and so on and on…..

      Your cluelessness is exasperating, no matter what it is that the free-market provides you just can’t make the leap that all the things you mention can also be provided by the market. And done for better value. Less expensive, safer, more available…whatever.

      So to make it happen all you folks need to do is GET THE FUCK OUT OF THE WAY! Stop voting for morons, stop meddling in the market, stop hindering folks who may have a “better” way.

      Just stop.

    42. #42 |  Dave Krueger | 

      #40 MacGregory

      I rarely threadjack but this was just too much:

      http://www.dailymail.com/News/200907231285

      Wow! That guy is obviously a psycho.

      On the bright side, the comments are looking more encouraging than usual (so far, anyway).

    43. #43 |  Michael Chaney | 

      The other issue with suddenly taxing the hell out of people who make money is that it widens the gap between rich and poor, as fewer people become rich. The author states that most rich people make their money on investments, not regular income, so it doesn’t matter. This is true. But to get money to invest in the first place requires income, and less taxed income.

      The bottom line is that when rich people have money, they invest it and those investments create jobs. Government is a parasite that cannot create wealth with the money, so when they take money from anybody, including the rich, it almost always hurts the GDP.

    44. #44 |  angulimala | 

      But on CNN the officer claims Gates only showed him his Harvard ID “that didn’t have his address on it” or something.

      These things do not add up.

      Of course they don’t. One of the two is obviously lying.

      There are 2 basic possibilities.

      1) Gates produced the ID and then asked the cop for his name and badge. The cop reacted with that “I’m superior to any fucking civie” attitude one occasionally sees and blew him off. Gates got upset at this obvious disrespect and went off on him. The cop then decided to teach him a lesson, lured him outside, arrested him, and then falsified the report to make his actions look more reasonable than they really were.

      2) The cop provided his name but Gates, for some reason, kept asking for it … despite already having it. Then Gates decided that he had nothing better to do than fabricate a scene and went off on the cop to engineer a racial incident.

      Pardon me, but I think you have to be seriously biased (not racist, but reflexively biased against those who claim to have been the victim of racism) to think that the race-baiting scenario is more likely than the “respect my authoritah” scenario.

    45. #45 |  angulimala | 

      That being said, I don’t think this was about racism. I think it was about cops thinking that they are superior to civilians and willing to use their authority to teach lessons to those they believe have failed to show them their desired level of deference.

    46. #46 |  Aresen | 

      Picky point on the “NY Times Correction”:

      It was put out on the day of the Apollo 11 launch, not after the Eagle landed on the moon.

    47. #47 |  Dave W. | 

      I just want to say I find it funny that Gates was calling Crowley a racist well before the point in time that Gates was arrested for disorderly conduct (the only, ONLY point in the sequence of events that could point to ‘racist motives’).

      No. Officer Crowley showed his racism by entering Gates’ house before requesting him to fetch his id.

    48. #48 |  Cynical in CA | 

      “I was planning to vote for the pro-gun, low-tax Democrat over the law-and-order Republican in the Virginia gubernatorial election this year. Our last two governors (Warner and Kaine) were centrist Democrats, and did a pretty good job. But this may make me change my mind.”

      My favorite minarchist, Jacob Hornberger, chimes in on the very subject:

      http://www.fff.org/blog/index.asp

    49. #49 |  Andrew | 

      RE: taser girls.

      I think it is obvious by now that the police are abusing tasers and that the abuse is epidemic. It’s high time these devices are either removed from the police entirely or at least be locked up and only accessible to shift supervisors or swat teams. There also need to be very strict guidelines as to when these torture devices can be employed and it should be mandatory that their use be videotaped.

      As for the professor two things. It appears as if the incident started out quite legitimately and should have ended when the man’s identity was established. It also appears that the professor has a stick up his ass. The officer should have established his ID and then simply turned around and left leaving him to rant and rave. Arresting and handcuffing the guy crossed the line. Establish he isn’t breaking into someone’s home and then leave it at that.

    50. #50 |  JThompson | 

      “I am Cop! Respect my authoritah!” is what I got from the whole Gates situation too.

      @Cynical in CA: I’ve disagreed with you about an awful lot of stuff, but Hornberger’s “Sure, we’re taught to believe that America is a two-party system — the Democrats and the Republicans — but that’s just a façade, given that both parties share the same statist philosophy and are simply competing against each other to determine who is going to control the system.” ought to be repeated non-effing-stop on the Tee-Vee machine until people get it. I can’t understand how people can automatically favor one party while automatically opposing the other when they’re the same damn party.
      The difference ended when democrats abandoned civil liberties and republicans abandoned small government.

    51. #51 |  greg | 

      “Until then, we could raise the corporate tax rate into the 60s and see little to no effect on corporate profitability.”

      Of course not! when calculating ROI for a particular item (I work in new product development for a mining company) all costs and overhead are taken into account, and then it is raised by ~34% to cover taxes (the worksheet I have to submit to the finance department even writes it out this way!). If “corporate taxes” were raised to 60%, we would simply adjust that number accordingly. No, our profits wouldn’t change a bit….the cost of our product on the other hand…?

    52. #52 |  Nathanael | 

      Hey, just because the Republican has one good idea for raising money by privatization doesn’t mean you should vote for more SWAT team murders.

      Keep your priorities straight. Voting for a “law and order” candidate is almost always wrong.

    53. #53 |  Dave Krueger | 

      This Gates fiasco would not be high on my list of examples of police misconduct. One problem with being sensitized to police misbehavior, as we are, is that we tend to see every event through a filter that supports our suspicions. This case may deserve mention and debate, but not outrage.

      I think it’s very possible the cop was initially acting in good faith. The eventual arrest may not be justifiable, but it might be understandable. No one was tasered or shot, no dogs were killed, and no property damage done. In the end, the charges were dropped.

      I think Gates was very likely being an obnoxious prick. Being a prick isn’t a crime, but it dampens my sympathy for him. I’ll reserve my outrage for an occasion where the victim plays a less active role in escalating the conflict.

    54. #54 |  Tom | 

      Deeds isn’t the same Deeds that ran against McDonnell for Attorney General. Over the last few years, Deeds has gone from being a conservative Democrat to a very typical liberal Democrat. Just look at his flip-flop on guns.

      If you’re going to pick a lesser of two evils, McDonnell is the one to choose. Plus don’t forget, Virginia’s gubernatorial election is usually seen as a test of how the President is doing. Giving Democrats a victory will just help Obama continue the course he is on.

    55. #55 |  Dave | 

      Zeb: “There are several interstate highways that I know of where there are tolls (collected by the state). Also, I believe that interstates are maintained and managed by the states that contain them (with significant federal funding).”

      We used to have tolls on a portion of I-95 in Richmond, the reason was because the section of road was not built with federal funds but rather the Richmond Metropolitan Authority was created to built that section, with the provision that once the road was paid for the tolls would be removed.
      It is a part of the federal law, I have a retired friend who worked for the Virginia dept of transportation at the time and he explained the law, as well as the backroom politicking, involved.

    56. #56 |  Ian Argent | 

      Parts of the New Jersey Turnpike are signed I-95. And anyone who’s taken I-95 through Delaware and Maryland should be quite aware that you have to bring a pretty penny along with you (it’s comparitively trivial to shunpike the NJ turnpike).

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