More Problems in Philly

Tuesday, June 2nd, 2009

More allegations of sexual assault during drug raids conducted by members of Philadelphia Officer Jeffrey Cujdik’s rogue narcotics team.

If these were normal citizens, and not cops, they’d have been indicted by now.

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40 Responses to “More Problems in Philly”

  1. #1 |  SJE | 

    If they were normal citizens, they would be called a “gang” or “the mob.”

  2. #2 |  Michael Chaney | 

    Hey, not to worry, they took care of the problem. He’s on desk duty, with no gun.

    That’ll teach him!

  3. #3 |  Michael Chaney | 

    By the way, I hear if he does it again they’re going to give him a wedgie.

  4. #4 |  Dave Krueger | 

    Thank god they edited out the naughty words from a story about how a law enforcement officer terrorized and sexually assaulted (referred to as “misconduct” when a cop does it) a woman. Describing the incident is one thing, but the grownup words need to be avoided so that readers aren’t upset.

  5. #5 |  Dave Krueger | 

    “The process almost seemed as though it was designed to help conceal the identity of the assailant,” he said, “rather than provide the victim a fair opportunity to identify her assailant.”

    Oh, no! Tell me it ain’t true! An internal investigation covering up the truth? That’s unheard of in police police departments.

  6. #6 |  MDGuy | 

    “Jeffrey Cujdik’s attorney, George Bochetto, has said that his client has done nothing wrong and that the accusations against him are lies.”

    Right, I’m sure these all these women, who have never met before, just spontaneously got together and decided, “hey let’s ruin some poor police officer’s life…now what’s our story?” and then had the coordination, discipline and planning to all describe the exact same M.O. about the exact same officer…makes you think, if the cops could just get over the harrassment claims, these women would make excellent state’s witnesses, since, you know, they’re so good at lying and stuff.

  7. #7 |  Tom G | 

    I was going to ask about the censorship but Dave K. beat me to it. I still don’t understand why in this day and age newspapers ever censor words, especially “tits”. Anybody over 10 has certainly seen and heard that word.

  8. #8 |  Mattocracy | 

    Cops are dangerous. Until people can lawfully resist rogue police officers, this will not stop.

  9. #9 |  Dave Krueger | 

    No officer has been charged with a crime.

    The entire story makes me fucking sick. If it weren’t for the press coverage, these cops would still be out there falsifying search warrants and assaulting women with the full knowledge and blessing of the department, if not the entire city government. What a bunch of sleazy low-life scum-sucking turds.

    I sure hope the press stays on their case, because it’s clear the cops are going to continue to cover up and protect their own corrupt sociopathetic cops. They clearly have no intention of cleaning up their act or excising the cancerous elements of their organization.

  10. #10 |  Tokin42 | 

    #9

    Preach on brother

  11. #11 |  Hamburgler007 | 

    In this day and age, police should be required to record any and every raid, and keep that recording in a file where it can’t be deleted. Considering the cost to conduct one of these raids, it would be a drop in the bucket. Cops say the camera was “malfunctioning?” Have an expert examine the camera and can their ass if they’re lying. Cop says I must have forgot to hit record? Can their ass because if their too fucking incompetent to work a video camera then they have no business barging into a home with a firearm.

  12. #12 |  Dave Krueger | 

    #11 Hamburgler007

    In this day and age, police should be required to record any and every raid, and keep that recording in a file where it can’t be deleted. Considering the cost to conduct one of these raids, it would be a drop in the bucket.

    I don’t think the main objection to that has anything to do with the cost of implementation. I think the objection is probably more about the cost of the resulting lawsuits.

    But, in terms of city government, “going after the cops” is political suicide. Remember, the public sees the cops as the only thing standing between the defenseless innocent villagers and the unbridled forces of Satan. It’s only fair that they be allowed to beat an occasional innocent person who mouths off or use a few random pretty civilian girls for sexual gratification. You have to put yourself inside the mind of Joe Public. I mean, ancient civilizations routinely sacrificed maidens to the gods, right? This is kind of like that, don’t you think?

  13. #13 |  ktc2 | 

    “rogue narcotics team”? Isn’t that redundant?

  14. #14 |  Tom G | 

    Once again, I have to ask, by the way….

    Would freed market, competing defense/investigation agencies who did NOT have that oh-so-special aura of “government LEO” really be as bad as this? They certainly wouldn’t get the immunity from lawsuits, that’s for sure.

  15. #15 |  J sub D | 

    I’m not sure if you’ve detailed this one. It’s more of the same from my hometown.
    Officer accused of forcing couples to have sex

  16. #16 |  Dave Krueger | 

    #15 J sub D

    I’m not sure if you’ve detailed this one. It’s more of the same from my hometown.

    Officer accused of forcing couples to have sex

    From the link:

    Detroit Sgt. Roosevelt Tidwell, 39, pleaded not guilty Thursday and has been suspended from his job with pay.

    and then:

    Tidwell is being held in the Wayne County jail in lieu of $1 million bail.

    The guy is in prison with $1 million bail requirement and he’s still getting paid. I think I can say unequivocally that my company wouldn’t be paying me under those circumstances. But then, the folks who run the company where I work aren’t complete fucking delusional parasites, either.

  17. #17 |  Yizmo Gizmo | 

    The disgraced cops got Cheney’s lawyer on their side now.
    They’re calling the breast-fondling and sexual comments
    “Enhanced Interrogation techniques.”

  18. #18 |  SJE | 

    #16: Lets see how long before the FOP comes out calling for “restraint” and “we shouldnt judge this man until after all the facts come out.”

  19. #19 |  scott | 

    “Jeffrey Cujdik’s attorney, George Bochetto, has said that his client has done nothing wrong and that the accusations against him are lies.”

    MDGuy, this is known as the “I know you are but what am I” defense and is a time-honored tradition among our LEOs. If you think that’s wrong then you, sir, are a terrorist.

  20. #20 |  MDGuy | 

    If that’s the case Scott, staple a Koran to my ass and mail me to Gitmo!

  21. #21 |  claude | 

    At least some good news regarding police brutality… the chicago cop that beat up that little bartender gal a couple years back was convicted of agravated battery earlier today.

    http://www.chicagobreakingnews.com/2009/06/abbate-acquitted-on-2-lesser-charges.html

  22. #22 |  Helmut O' Hooligan | 

    #14 Tom G: “Would freed market, competing defense/investigation agencies who did NOT have that oh-so-special aura of “government LEO” really be as bad as this? They certainly wouldn’t get the immunity from lawsuits, that’s for sure.”

    I don’t know, Tom. But respectfully, without the “oh-so-special aura of ‘government LEO,” these private officers will face hurdles of their own. I work as a non-sworn officer at a large private hospital. Even though I am basically doing police work, the criminal element (and some non-criminals) act like they can walk all over me because I am not “the police” and I don’t carry a firearm. The fact that I am acting under authority of the property owner (the hospital) and I do have (private) arrest authority (just as they do) doesn’t enter into their minds. So these private officers and detectives will constantly have their leigitimacy questioned, at least at the outset. Imagine them trying to win over a public that sees them as nothing more than poorly qualified “rent-a-cops.”

    Beyond this, if people refuse to comply with a private officer, what happens next. Will there still be courts and jails that offenders can be transferred to? Under whose authority? Who will review the decision of the officer to arrest a subject? Or will the private officer just have to settle things in the street? If so, you have just removed an important set of checks and balances. I’m not convinced the market can substitute for these checks and balances that our (very) imperfect system has in place.

    Beyond these legal questions, I have grave concerns about the training and qualifications of these private officers. Don’t get me wrong, I see plenty of deficits in the training of government LEO’s, but at least they must meet minimum standards. As a private officer, I can tell you that employers are frequently very backward when it comes to training security personnel. Why? Because they aren’t required to, and it’s just an added expense to them, that’s why! In my opinion, the appearance of security is valued more than a truly competent security program in most private enterprises.

    Well that’s enough for now. Perhaps you can ameliorate some of my concerns, Tom.

  23. #23 |  Stephen | 

    from the link provided by #21 | claude |

    “But prosecutors said police officers are held to a higher standard, so when they commit crimes they are automatically guilty of official misconduct.”

    Huh? ……. WTF?

  24. #24 |  Zargon | 

    #22
    Beyond this, if people refuse to comply with a private officer, what happens next. Will there still be courts and jails that offenders can be transferred to? Under whose authority? Who will review the decision of the officer to arrest a subject? Or will the private officer just have to settle things in the street? If so, you have just removed an important set of checks and balances. I’m not convinced the market can substitute for these checks and balances that our (very) imperfect system has in place.

    You can’t compare a hypothetical private police force to a hypothetical ideal state solution. You talk of checks and balances in our imperfect system, but our system, as it currently stands, has no significant checks or balances. Officers can do anything they want, and on those rare occasions that they’re caught, count on getting a punishment several orders of magnitude below what is deserved.

    Nobody knows the details of how a fully private police force would work, simply because nobody has ever seen one. However, I fail to see how it could possibly be worse than what we have, simply because bad solutions (police forces that don’t protect their subscribers) will get replaced by good solutions (police forces that do). I could guess what the details of a fully private police force might look like, how it might handle claims, protection, and offenders, but that’s all it would be – a guess. What will make it work isn’t the details, its the big picture, and the big picture says people won’t subscribe to a police force that doesn’t protect them if they don’t have to.

  25. #25 |  Edwin Sheldon | 

    Beyond these legal questions, I have grave concerns about the training and qualifications of these private officers. Don’t get me wrong, I see plenty of deficits in the training of government LEO’s, but at least they must meet minimum standards. As a private officer, I can tell you that employers are frequently very backward when it comes to training security personnel. Why? Because they aren’t required to, and it’s just an added expense to them, that’s why! In my opinion, the appearance of security is valued more than a truly competent security program in most private enterprises.

    Most of the time, a free competitive market will lead to low-quality security firms receiving few clients…if the regulatory state keeps its filthy paws out of the industry.

  26. #26 |  Helmut O' Hooligan | 

    #24 Zargon/ #25 Edwin Sheldon:

    Thanks for continuing this discussion, guys. One step that I could actually envision–though it wouldn’t eliminate the state–is licensing of peace officers in a manner similar to EMT’s. In other words, officers would have to complete a mandatory state training course, but they could go to work for private institutions or agencies (like EMT’s going to work for a private ambulance service or a hospital). These private agencies could compete, just as private EMS providers do. Actually, I think Carl Klockars (former U of Delaware Prof. and author of “The Idea of Police.” discusses this theory). I wouldn’t say I advocate this idea, but I think my concerns about training wouldn’t be as pronounced if this system were in place.

    Beyond policing and investigation, I still have problems with privatization of courts and/or corrections. If I really try, I can see the possibility of private policing, but these other aspects of the justice system are a tougher sell for me.

  27. #27 |  claude | 

    “Huh? ……. WTF?”

    Baffles the mind, doesnt it?

  28. #28 |  Mark Z. | 

    Would freed market, competing defense/investigation agencies who did NOT have that oh-so-special aura of “government LEO” really be as bad as this? They certainly wouldn’t get the immunity from lawsuits, that’s for sure.

    Sure, they would. You’d try to sue them in their own courts and they’d say “Fuck off.” (Just like the government does, but without the chance to find a few of them who actually believe in the Constitution and public service and all that crap.) The only way to hold them accountable would be superior firepower, which you wouldn’t have.

    Though since we’re speculating, I suppose you could always engage your Super-Objectivist Powers and blow them away with optic blasts of economic productivity while deflecting their bullets with the power of pure reason. Good luck with that.

  29. #29 |  Hamburgler007 | 

    Having a private police force is a really, really bad idea. I know the idea of taking away some of the government’s negative influence from law enforcement is appealing, but going to private policing would be taking a giant step backwards.

  30. #30 |  OneByTheCee | 

    #17 | Yizmo Gizmo said:

    “”They’re calling the breast-fondling and sexual comments
    “Enhanced Interrogation techniques.””

    OR:

    “Distraction groping and dirty talk” El Monte CA PD style!

  31. #31 |  anarch | 

    I look forward to reading the Comments section to one of the articles about this; I wonder how the cop will be defended.

  32. #32 |  Tom G | 

    Okay, I’ll bite. Exactly HOW would many private and competing defense forces be a giant step backwards from what we have now, which is ONE force which demands (not earns) respect, which you cannot sue, which usually gets a pass from the media, and which investigates itself with barely any input from us “citizens” when they do wrong?
    I know it’s hard to believe, but anarchists have been discussing the whole question of what would replace the State monopoly on policing for decades. There are a few solutions that have been proposed, and space doesn’t permit me to list them all. All your objections have been argued over and discussed, including the “pet court” issue.

  33. #33 |  Yizmo Gizmo | 

    Well, the problem with privatization is that there would be
    financial incentive, to arrest, cite, incarcerate that would never
    happen with government-run police/courts.
    That never happen to them. LOL

  34. #34 |  Red Green | 

    Public opinion of our police forces is sinking fast thanks to videos and stories like this repeated over and over again. If we have bad laws, we have bad cops trying take advantage of enforcing them. Of course this type of police aggression will continue until citizens take their power back, and I think we know what that means. Just wait till the guys come back from Iraq and find that the only job offerings are in the law enforcement industry.The veterans have mostly developed a good distain for citizenry due to standard procedure over there. Then we should hit the ‘enough is enough” point. We are ,afterall ,duty bound to oppose tyranny ,both foreign and domestic.

  35. #35 |  Stormy Dragon | 

    Exactly HOW would many private and competing defense forces be a giant step backwards from what we have now, which is ONE force which demands (not earns) respect, which you cannot sue, which usually gets a pass from the media, and which investigates itself with barely any input from us “citizens” when they do wrong?

    Suppose my neighbor breaks into my house and steals my TV. I call my privately contracted security squad A about it, and they go over to my neighbor to investigate, where they run into a group of officers from privately contracted security squad B. Suqad B announces there’s no basis for an investigation and if squad A comes onto the property, they’ll be arrested.

    Now what?

  36. #36 |  Tom G | 

    Here is the wikipedia page that discusses this issue, including some of the objections. Be sure to follow up with the reference papers at the bottom.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_defense

  37. #37 |  Helmut O' Hooligan | 

    Thank you for the information, Tom. Even when I disagree with people on the Agitator, I often find myself better informed for having the argument. That is one of the great strengths of this blog, relative to most other.

  38. #38 |  Dave Krueger | 

    #37 Helmut O’ Hooligan

    Even when I disagree with people on the Agitator, I often find myself better informed for having the argument.

    Although I never realized it at the time it was happening, all of my opinions were born of a hard fought bloody defense of an earlier belief that turned out to be wrong. I defend my new opinions just as aggressively.

    I’m hoping that someday I will once again be as smart as I was when I was young and didn’t know anything.

  39. #39 |  Rad Geek People’s Daily 2009-06-11 – The Police Beat | 

    […] has been to reassign this accused serial rapist to an easy desk job for the past three weeks. (Via Radley Balko 2009-06-02; as Balko says, If these were normal citizens, and not cops, they’d have been indicted by […]

  40. #40 |  The Police Beat | War On You: Breaking Alternative News | 

    […] has been to reassign this accused serial rapist to an easy desk job for the past three weeks. (Via Radley Balko 2009-06-02; as Balko says, If these were normal citizens, and not cops, they’d have been indicted by […]

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