Another Isolated Incident

Thursday, May 7th, 2009

Police raid the wrong house in Baltimore. Weeks later, the guy still can’t get the city to repair his door. Their explanation is that because the address written on the warrant is the address the police raided, there was no mistake. Even though the guy they were actually after lived and was eventually arrested two doors down.

Ah, but it gets worse. If it’s not the cops, it’s the bureaucrats. The guy stored his old door in his backyard, hoping the city would eventually repair it. When it became clear that wasn’t going to happen, he called the city’s special trash pick-up to come and get it. They never did. But a city code inspector did come, and fined the guy $50 for having a broken door in his backyard.

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44 Responses to “Another Isolated Incident”

  1. #1 |  Mike | 

    It’s great that one of the opening sentances in the article is the dog was not harmed. Looks like that issue is certainly bubbling to the top of peoples awareness.

  2. #2 |  Marta Rose | 

    Radley, you’ll convert the most hard-core of the left of us with stories like this. I mean, your critique of police militarization is not at all incompatible with a lefty philosophy, but those city bureaucrats! Man, I *hate* them!

  3. #3 |  Mattocracy | 

    The article mentioned the Cato Institute. That’s a plus.

  4. #4 |  Rhayader | 

    I’m tempted to call this comical. Of course, it was just a dog slaying or two away from being tragic instead.

  5. #5 |  Robin | 

    What’s wrong with having a broken door in your backyard?

  6. #6 |  Fascist Nation | 

    Man the police really screwed up in not following standard procedure in not immediately machine gunning the dog when they found it cowering under the bed. It’s for their safety you understand.

    The best part was the lesson in not contacting government. So far it has cost him $50.

    No-knock raids can be carried out … by police who determine at the scene that announcing themselves would present a safety threat or lead to the destruction of evidence….often involving masked and armed officers….

    Interesting this got included. Someone has been educating the media. And the author had better learn to stick to the press release if he wants to continue working around here in these hard economic times.

  7. #7 |  Johnny Clamboat | 

    Fear of retribution is such that the author won’t even attach his name to this story:

    Police goof in raid, city stalls on damages
    Man stymied in pursuit of door repair compensation

    By a Baltimore Sun staff writer

  8. #8 |  Bob | 

    Oh… So the POLICE weren’t at fault because the incorrect address was on the warrant?

    Who the fuck was? The Warrant fairy?

    Also no indication what kind of drug kingpin the actual target was… David Pfister, who lived 3 doors down. Is Baltimore now safer with him off the street? I doubt it.

    Is Baltimore poorer because they’re paying hundreds of people to do nothing but break into people’s houses for utterly minor shit? Yup!

  9. #9 |  Balloon Maker | 

    The police would save a whole lot of time by just making out a warrant for every address in the city (shit, hire a few people to put them together and rubber stamp them). Then they’d never hit the wrong house!

  10. #10 |  Theassembler | 

    Warrant Fairy – LOL. You gotta wonder what due diligence if any is done by the judicial branch involved in all these warrants.

  11. #11 |  Rhayader | 

    @Theassembler: Hah yeah I always wonder where the judges are when these crap warrants are issued too.

    As far as I can tell, they almost always unquestioningly accept everything the cops tell them and rubber-stamp the warrant without a second thought.

  12. #12 |  MacK | 

    Sarcasm follows:
    I agree with the city, after all the courts just recently said that police can’t be held responsible for mistakes on warrants. Wink Wink thanks justices. Did not take long for them to start using the mistake clause excuse to the 4th Amendment.

    This may be the saddest part..
    “Leonard said he isn’t angry at the police. One of his best friends is a New York City detective, and Leonard said that he understands that officers put their lives on the line running into dangerous houses.”

    Well wasn’t that understanding of him. I will say right now my friends kick my door in, I’m going to be pissed. It will be dangerous for them, because I live in a Castle Doctrine state, and will use it to my advantage.

  13. #13 |  Chris in AL | 

    This is all because there is nobody with any sense of morals or decency in law enforcement or government.

    To any of you out there that are the ones doing these things to people, just a quick question…

    How do you raise your children? Are you so full of shit that you actually teach them to tell the truth and take responsibility for their actions, even as you willfully avoid those very concepts at every single opportunity? Or do you teach them to fuck people every chance they get and to never do the right thing even when their actions directly caused harm to an innocent person?

    “Daddy’s home! What did you do today daddy?”

    “Well, we went and destroyed an innocent man’s property! It was an accident, but we all decided to say that it wasn’t and nobody did anything wrong. And when the man asked us to fix what we broke, we sent a building inspector over there to fine him for the damage we caused, heehee! That will teach him a lesson about expecting people to do the right thing. I want you to know that I do this for you, and truly hope that someday you will grow up to be a no-character, son-of-a-bitch just like your dad!”

  14. #14 |  Warrant Fairy | 

    I resent the implication that I was at fault in the issuance of this warrant.

    All my warrants are good and just.

    It was the Warrant Troll’s fault.

  15. #15 |  ManM | 

    It’s for the children! That makes it right!

  16. #16 |  thomasblair | 

    Chris in AL,

    But it’s daaaaangerouuuuuus for the pigs not to go in guns blazing, killing dogs, and tearing shit up.

    It’s probably for the children, too.

    You seriously have to wonder how these people teach their children. I’d never considered the question you just asked. I think it will be a nice rhetorical tool in conversation.

  17. #17 |  Dave Krueger | 

    #7 Johnny Clamboat

    Fear of retribution is such that the author won’t even attach his name to this story:

    He mentions Cato and five will get you ten that he’s heard of theagitator.com.

    “Critics say the confrontational tactic, often involving masked and armed officers, is increasingly being used in situations that don’t require such a volatile response.”

    Most reporters probably would never have thought to question the legitimacy of aggressive no-knock raids.

  18. #18 |  Dave Krueger | 

    Anthony Guglielmi, a police spokesman, said officials were evaluating procedures followed in the raid.

    Oh, well that certainly is a relief. I’m sure everyone who mistakenly gets their door bashed in from now on will appreciate that.

  19. #19 |  Zargon | 

    This is all because there is nobody with any sense of morals or decency in law enforcement or government.

    This seems very nearly true, and it’s enlightening to wonder why this is so.

    I would submit there is a very small minority of people who have a rigorous set of morals they follow for the sake of being good people. There’s another very small minority on the other end, who enjoy being evil just for the fun of it.

    But the vast, vast majority of people (everyone, not just government people) simply don’t think about these things and go with the flow. That is – they respond to incentives.

    Now, normal people generally have incentives stacked in favor of refraining from hurting other people. If they consider a course of action which would involve hurting somebody else for personal gain, sometimes they have the law to worry about, and always have their reputation to worry about. Unless you hang out with a bunch of sociopaths (and there really aren’t that many), the people around you will disapprove of your actions or cut ties with you if you cause enough harm to people. They’ll probably tell their friends to steer clear of you too.

    Government employees generally have none of that. They have plenty of possible courses of action within their jobs that involve hurting other people for personal gain, and they are generally exempt from sanction for their evil deeds, both by the law, and informally by their friends. Their friends are taught that doing that stuff is just part of the job, and so they accept it as perfectly normal. People have a broken moral compass when it comes to government employees doing stuff they would find anybody else doing to be abhorrent.

    And so, government will occasionally get a person who finds it unacceptable to wantonly destroy people’s lives for the hell of it, but most people in the government will just go with the flow, because everyone around them tells them that’s just how things are.

  20. #20 |  Frank | 

    #9 I suspect this is the real reason the Census Bureau is tagging every front door by GPS.

  21. #21 |  Frank | 

    #12 Right on. At this point, the only way to get the police’s attention on this matter is to make sure at least one of the gang doesn’t go home after a raid like this.

    And if the gangster is denied a hero’s funeral, so much the better.

  22. #22 |  ChrisD | 

    If Kafka lived today, he’d just film documentaries.

  23. #23 |  Johnny Clamboat | 

    Fear of retribution is such that the author won’t even attach his name to this story

    Er.. or not.

    http://www.poynter.org/column.asp?id=45&aid=163223

    I still like my theory better though.

  24. #24 |  Yizmo Gizmo | 

    Can you imagine if we had these types of paramilitary
    attacks on corrupt, self-serving politicians
    or greedy bankers?

  25. #25 |  nobahdi | 

    Police goof in raid, city stalls on damages
    Man stymied in pursuit of door repair compensation

    By a Baltimore Sun staff writer

    I predict the police will launch a full and thorough investigation… into who the reporter is that said they “goofed.”

  26. #26 |  fwb | 

    Read _The Road to Serfdom_ . Hayek will explain why we end up with azzoles in government.

    Tiochfaidh ar la!

  27. #27 |  Steve | 

    @#2 Marta said, “I mean, your critique of police militarization is not at all incompatible with a lefty philosophy, but those city bureaucrats!” “Leftists” force people to give up control of what they work for, regulate how they do business, regulate anything they do which could conceivably have any possible affect on the environment. What encourages better behavior on the part of the enforcers of laws and rules laid out according to “lefty philosophy” blueprints? The weaker the government, the less power they have to get away with this.

    It definitely is incompatible. (The same goes for law and order Republican types, too. They don’t stop this sort of tyranny, but encourage it.)

  28. #28 |  Snarky | 

    If Kafka lived today, he’d just film documentaries.

    ChrisD: I lol’ed.

  29. #29 |  David | 

    I’m not sure the state of the law, but aside from right and wrong, it’s also stupid. It’s because of idiocy like this that some fraction of people who are wronged find a lawyer who’s willing to work on contingency (or from a non-profit agency) and sue, and eventually there’s a settlement or verdict for far more than it would have cost to fix the f***ing door to begin with.

  30. #30 |  World B. Free | 

    From the assassination of JFK,RFK,MLK, to the murder of JFK jr. and the physically impossible destruction of three overbuilt steel framed buildings by offcourse airliners this is amusing in a psychopathic sort of way. Come on , you don’t think they’re just fuckin’ with us? Seein’ how much shit we’ll eat before we send some of it back to tha chef?

  31. #31 |  Aresen | 

    IGNORE THE TROLL.

    IGNORE THE TROLL.

  32. #32 |  MikeL | 

    Speaking of isolated incidents, yet another ‘rare’ incident of a taser killing someone.

    http://ca.news.yahoo.com/s/capress/090507/national/alta_taser_death

  33. #33 |  Marty | 

    the bureaucrat inspectors have been used by the cops to shut down ‘drug houses’… I guess now the cops are being used by the bureaucrats to create ‘code violations’…

  34. #34 |  World B. Free | 

    Why does so much of this site’s commentary remind me of “The Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner”? You know, drowning in the sea with nothing to drink or eat save the stinking rotting carcass of what you call capitalism but is more correctly called state mandated prostitution?

  35. #35 |  Travis_T | 

    When the cops act like decent people should, instead of steroid crazed knuckle-heads, even kicking down the wrong door doesn’t have to end up in a lawsuit or a forever traumatized pig hating family.

    http://www.gazette.com/articles/wrong-53175-accidentally-police.html

  36. #36 |  dispatches from TJICistan » Blog Archive » Never forget - the purpose of government isn’t to help the citizen - it’s to help government employees | 

    […] http://www.theagitator.com/2009/05/07/an… […]

  37. #37 |  GreginOz | 

    HA! They missed the dawg, they missed the dawg…pussies.

  38. #38 |  Andrew | 

    “He has erected a multitude of New Offices, and sent hither swarms of Officers to harass our people and eat out their substance.”

    At least the king didn’t charge you 50 bucks for a door his goons broke.

    Yet another instance where the tyranny of the current government far exceeds any that we experienced at the hands of King George III. The list of grievances in the Declaration Of Independence are frighteningly familiar.

  39. #39 |  cks | 

    Related note: Ryan Frederick sentencing Friday. News item I saw said RF’s lawyers will be asking judge to reduce charges to involuntary manslaughter.

  40. #40 |  Michael Chaney | 

    Threadjack:

    http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2009/05/teenage-bomb-threat-suspect-was-an-internet-prank-phone-call-star/

    Seems the kid who was disappeared for nothing a few posts back was making money by phoning bomb threats to various places. Weird story.

  41. #41 |  Dave Krueger | 

    #40 Michael Chaney

    Seems the kid who was disappeared for nothing a few posts back was making money by phoning bomb threats to various places. Weird story.

    We’ve been had.

  42. #42 |  Andrew Williams | 

    You can’t win for losing. And vice versa.

    And anarchy is worse HOW?????????????????

  43. #43 |  Andrew Williams | 

    Anent #15:

    “WON’T SOMEBODY *PLEASE* THINK ABOUT THE CHILDREN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!”

    Are we not men? We are WACO!!!!!!!!!!

  44. #44 |  Andrew Williams | 

    Uncle Sam can suck my dick.

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