More on Bad Philly Cops

Friday, May 1st, 2009

I want to elaborate a bit on the Philadelphia Fraternal Order of Police’s shameful defense of Officer Jeffrey Cudjik, a cop now under internal and federal investigations for habitual lying on affidavits; harassing, terrorizing and possibly stealing from immigrant shop owners; and routinely violating procedures on dealing with informants (see post below). Cujdik’s exploits have been exposed by the Philadelphia Daily News. Check out this February article on the FOP’s rally in support of Cujdik:

The Fraternal Order of Police and Officer Jeffrey Cujdik’s lawyer joined forces yesterday to attack Daily News stories that raised questions about Cujdik’s relationship with a paid police informant.

“It’s a shame we have to stand here today to defend a highly decorated police officer in the Narcotics Field Unit, an officer who confiscates a ton of drugs, a ton of guns and is out there doing what a lot of other citizens in the city of Philadelphia do not want to do,” FOP President John J. McNesby said.

Flanked by more than a dozen officers at a news conference inside FOP headquarters, on Spring Garden Street near Broad, McNesby said that the FOP would defend Cujdik “to the wall.”

[...]

At times the attack seemed personal: “You have to remember, you’re dealing with a confidential informant here. A confidential informant in the city of Philadelphia is one step above a Daily News reporter,” McNesby said, prompting cops to applaud and laugh.

McNesby is referring to allegations against Cujdik made by one of his former informants. But those allegations have since been bolstered by statements from victims of Cujdik’s raids, and by a review (see post below) of search warrants conducted by Cujdik’s unit.

The sad irony here is that when an informant makes an allegation against a citizen, his word is considered good enough to send a squad of police officers to kick down that citizen’s door. In some states, the word of a confidential informant, without any corroboration, is enough for an indictment and arrest on drug charges, putting even innocent people in the position of having to decide whether to fight the charges and risk a prison term or plea to something they didn’t do, and accept probation and a criminal record. This is what happened in places like Tula and Hearne, and what I’m sure happens all over the country with these narcotics unit, whose funding tends to rest on how many arrests and seizures they make.

But witness how quickly cops will trash an informant whose word was gold in search warrant affidavits for years the moment he comes forth with allegations of police corruption.

Digg it |  reddit |  del.icio.us |  Fark

17 Responses to “More on Bad Philly Cops”

  1. #1 |  Tokin42 | 

    I remember when my mom used to put me to sleep while singing “look for the union label”. The worst of 2 worlds, a bad cop and a union who couldn’t care less.

  2. #2 |  Michael Chaney | 

    http://www.philly.com/dailynews/local/44038947.html

    “A veteran Philadelphia police officer was arrested Tuesday after he allegedly pistol-whipped his fiancee during a domestic dispute.”

    “Vanore said Muhammad, a 13-year veteran assigned most recently to the Narcotics Field Unit, was charged with aggravated assault, simple assault, recklessly endangering another person and possessing an instrument of crime.”

  3. #3 |  Mario | 

    Perhaps a boycott of all goods produced in Philadelphia or of any businesses with corporate offices in Philadelphia should be organized. This was done to put pressure on the South African apartheid regime, 25 years ago, and it’s been done since.

    People call for things like this regarding individual business all the time, but I don’t know if it’s ever been used to target a city government indirectly. The businesses and people of Philadelphia might have to put pressure on their government if the boycott achieved any degree of popularity. A success in one city could then be duplicated in others.

    Is this a wacky idea?

  4. #4 |  SJE | 

    New professionalism at its finest

    The FOP brushes over the very clear video evidence of the narcotics task force cutting security cameras. What reason do they give for that?. As the police say, “if you have nothing to hide,” etc… Even if there was some “keep identities secret” excuse, they could always go to a judge and ask to have the videos turned over.

  5. #5 |  Marty | 

    ‘“It’s a shame we have to stand here today to defend a highly decorated police officer in the Narcotics Field Unit, an officer who confiscates a ton of drugs, a ton of guns and is out there doing what a lot of other citizens in the city of Philadelphia do not want to do,” FOP President John J. McNesby said.’

    I say it’s about time these thieves and destroyers of liberty have been put on the defensive!

  6. #6 |  Mike T | 

    At times the attack seemed personal: “You have to remember, you’re dealing with a confidential informant here. A confidential informant in the city of Philadelphia is one step above a Daily News reporter,” McNesby said, prompting cops to applaud and laugh.

    So, if I read him correctly, the Philly PD has an official policy of sending armed men to batter down private citizens’ doors based on the word of people who are lying sacks of shit.

  7. #7 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    New Professionalism Philly will have to try a lot harder than this to top MOVE bombings.

    In other news, NH welcomes home Souter and only wishes his stay would be at the Liberty Hotel (oh…we haven’t forgotten Kelo).

  8. #8 |  Ben | 

    We need an American Ghandi, in my humble opinion.

  9. #9 |  chris | 

    Mario,it’s not totally wacky,but we did get former Philly mayor fast eddie as our gov. now.

    And that’s really what’s wacky….

    CIII

  10. #10 |  Big Chief | 

    Mario,
    I’m with you. It does seem like something needs to be done to combat the systemic problems with police dept’s across the country. But I don’t think boycott’s do much good unless they are really widespread and total. And as the US embargo of Cuba shows, they still don’t seem to have much effect. I would think it would require an active response. Something along the lines of mailing ziploc bags to the FOP, the Chief of Police, and the mayor of Philly. It’s only symbolic, but it’s something.

  11. #11 |  JS | 

    #10 Isn’t it a shame that getting our elected leaders to reign in our totally out of control police isn’t even an option?

  12. #12 |  supercat | 

    “It’s a shame we have to stand here today to defend a highly decorated police officer in the Narcotics Field Unit, an officer who confiscates a ton of drugs, a ton of guns and is out there doing what a lot of other citizens in the city of Philadelphia do not want to do,” FOP President John J. McNesby said.

    It is indeed a shame that they feel an obligation to defend such a person.

  13. #13 |  dsmallwood | 

    yawn … what a tired old POS that line is … i work in a great company, lots of smart people, very profitable business, great place to work. and yet … its only in the police force where EVERY worker is great. yup. not a bad one in the bunch. gotta “go to the wall” for all of them cause they are ALL saints and / or knights errant.

    seriously … STFU. i am not calling for the FOP to ‘sacrifice’ someone, but if they want to be credible, they HAVE to acknowledge that every apple tree can grow a bad apple or two.
    WTF

  14. #14 |  max | 

    They have done so dsmallwood, why just recently they didn’t defend William Thresher and he was fired. Of course he made (arguably, there is dispute about how to interpret his remarks) racist comments which is a real no no instead of just honest police work like threatening, perjury, theft, extortion & so on.

  15. #15 |  Kevin Carson | 

    The Brits have the right name for them–filth.

    I’m surprised you don’t have any anonymous threatening comments from off-duty cops, because that’s the way the cockroaches normally react when you turn the kitchen light on one of their “brothers in blue.”

    It’s interesting that John Timoney came out of that institutional culture. He had an animus against the antiglobalization movement, and proposed the use of both RICO and counter-terrorism statutes to suppress it. He also went on to supervise the Miami police riots during the anti-FTAA demonstrations. Worst of all, he was connected to the highest circles of Homeland Security at one point, and looked like he might have been groomed to play Clyde Tolson to Tom Ridge’s J. Edgar Hoover. He’s still an influential consultant in the domestic security-industrial complex, and very much involved in the Halliburtonization of the domestic anti-terror state.

  16. #16 |  Stormy Dragon | 

    Wow, how do I choose a winner in corrupt cops vs. violent anti-globalization protestors. Can they both lose?

    It occurs to me that both groups have the same problem. There’s good cops and non-violent protrestors, but both groups attract people who are only there because they can get away with commiting violent crimes on the community. And both groups feel a need to go out of their way to defend there bad apples.

  17. #17 |  Darren | 

    The problem is systemic. While the govt has cops they will be abusive. See “Drug Prohibition: Law Enforcement Is The Problem”
    http://theinternationallibertarian.blogspot.com/2009/04/drug-prohibition-law-enforcement-is.html

    Please don’t boycott Philly. I live in the ‘burbs outside of it. I need my job, thank you.

Leave a Reply