Tearful Atlanta Cops Express Remorse for Shooting 92-Year-Old Kathryn Johnston, Leaving Her To Bleed to Death in Her Own Home While They Planted Drugs in Her Basement, Then Threatening an Informant So He Would Lie To Cover It All Up

Tuesday, February 24th, 2009

Sorry, but I’m having a hard time conjuring up any sympathy for these guys. They’re due to be sentenced this week. To put it into perspective, all three are expected to receive about the same sentence as Ryan Frederick. That ain’t justice.

I will say, however, that evil and inexcusable as these bastards are, there’s some truth in this excerpt:

Tesler said when he joined the narcotics unit, he was told to “sit, watch and learn” from superiors who cut corners to meet performance quotas for arrests and warrants. “I was a new part and plugged into a broken system,” Tesler said.

Tesler said when he saw Smith about to plant baggies of marijuana inside Johnston’s home to make it look like a drug house, he shook his head in disapproval. Tesler said he falsified the police report and later lied about the raid because Smith told him to follow the cover-up script. Tesler said he wasn’t about to “rat” on a senior officer.

His father, Jack Tesler, said his son was “being vilified and over-prosecuted.”

Smith said his moral compass failed when he began to think “drug dealers were no longer human.”

“I saw myself above them,” he said.

This is what happens when you declare “war” on American citizens. You dehumanize them. And you instill an ends-justifies-the-means, win at all costs mindset in your “warriors.” This mindset infected the entire narcotics unit at Atlanta PD. You’d have to be awfully naive to believe the problem is limited to Atlanta.

Officers Junnier, Smith, and Tesler are going to prison. But you could make a good case that they were only responding to incentives. A lot of other people have Kathryn Johnston’s blood on their hands too, people with names like Bennett, Gates, Walters, Souder, Tandy, and Meese. They’ve been ratcheting up the war rhetoric of drug prohibition for 30 years. It boggles my mind that I’m “known” for this issue. For this to even be an issue, we had to have reached the point where most of America is now accustomed to the notion that state agents dressed in battle garb can and will tear down the doors of private homes in the middle of the night for nothing more than mere possession of psychoactive substances. And most of the time, they do it under the full color of law.

It shouldn’t be at all surprising that this particular war’s boots on the ground might start to take all of that war imagery to heart, and take shortcuts around whatever largely ritualistic Fourth Amendment procedures we have left to “protect” against whatever it is we still might call “unreasonable” searches (if a violent, terrifying, paramilitary-style raid in the middle of the night on someone suspected of a nonviolent, consensual crime isn’t “unreasonable,” I don’t know what would be).

Kathryn Johnston’s death is tragic. But the real tragedy here is that had the cops found a stash of marijuana in her basement that actually did belong to her–say for pain treatment or nausea–her death would have faded quickly from the national news, these tactics would have been deemed by most to be wholly legitimate, and we probably wouldn’t still be talking about her today.

These cops were evil. But they worked within an evil system that’s not only immoral on its face, but is rife with bad incentives and plays to the worst instincts in human nature.

UPDATE: Via the AJC:

U.S. District Judge Julie Carnes sentenced former officer Gregg Junnier to six years in prison, Jason Smith to 10 years in prison and Arthur Tesler to 5 years in prison.

Digg it |  reddit |  del.icio.us |  Fark

81 Responses to “Tearful Atlanta Cops Express Remorse for Shooting 92-Year-Old Kathryn Johnston, Leaving Her To Bleed to Death in Her Own Home While They Planted Drugs in Her Basement, Then Threatening an Informant So He Would Lie To Cover It All Up”

  1. #1 |  paranoiastrksdp | 

    “Officers Junnier, Smith, and Tesler are going to prison.”

    Where the inmates will dispatch the punishment they *really* have earned for themselves.

    Fuck em, I hope they get the shank.

  2. #2 |  Euler | 

    They won’t throw cops in the general population. They will be protected in jail unlike people like Ryan Frederick who will probably be someone’s prison bitch for next 10 years of his life seeing as how he is just a regular guy being thrown in with a bunch of murderers and rapists.

  3. #3 |  Andrew | 

    You know what? These guys are scapegoats. Mind you, they deserve whatever punishment they get, and more, as the “just following orders” excuse isn’t valid at all. But their superiors, who more or less created the culture that allowed this to happen, if not outright encouraged it to happen, get off scott free with nary a punishment.

  4. #4 |  TC | 

    U.S. District Judge Julie Carnes sentenced former officer Gregg Junnier to six years in prison, Jason Smith to 10 years in prison and Arthur Tesler to five years in prison.

    http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/atlanta/stories/2009/02/23/johnston_sentencing.html?cxntlid=homepage_tab_newstab&cxntlid=homepage_tab_newstab

    ******

    Documents reveal details in Johnston slaying, cover-up

    This time, Smith had authored the trumped-up affidavit. For all three, it was business as usual.

    …But part of his side income came from “security jobs” prosecutors say he ran while on duty,…

    …But Sheats was unreliable, so they called White at 5:05 p.m. to come make a buy to prove a dealer lived there. White couldn’t come. But for this squad, it didn’t matter. They’d just invent the facts they needed….

    http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/atlanta/stories//2009/02/22/kathryn_johnston_sentencing.html

    *******
    Prosecutors say the three ex-cops should be equally responsible for one thing: They must pay Johnston’s estate $8,180 — the cost of burying her.

    The judge so ordered that as well.

    All three should have gotten 15-25, let the jailers figure out who is to be let out. Hopefully they get general population as well so they can join some of the “friends” they made during their crime spree and be rewarded!

  5. #5 |  Mattocracy | 

    The saddest thing out of all of this is the fact that they weren’t convicted because the system worked or because of an oversight committee or anything like that. These guys were just so incompetent and fucked up so badly that not even the cover up mechanisms of law enforcement could have saved them.

    Police officers with more professional experience would have gotten away with it.

  6. #6 |  SusanK | 

    #3 (Andrew) – what? got off “scott free with nary a punishment”? Come on, their unit got dismantled, a freakin’ civilian review board was established, the feds came in and breathed down their necks for a while and their buddies went to prison.
    What more do you want? It’s not like someone died.
    Wait, nevermind.

  7. #7 |  qwints | 

    10 years for prison in a cop is very different than 10 years for prison in a person who shot a cop (even accidentally).

  8. #8 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    If I understand how the state works these things…

    If you say you were just following orders (regardless of those orders being illegal, immoral, or just batshit crazy and murderous), you get off (“soldiers” must follow orders).

    THEN we look at who gave the orders and each layer claims they were “just following orders” until the state finds someone who CANNOT be prosecuted. Then we rest.

    First exact summary I’ve seen on this, Radley. They shot an ANCIENT woman, let her bleed to death rather than give aid, then planted drugs (where’d they get them?), and lied, lied, lied, lied, lied.

    Those tears they shed are because they are TRULY remorseful…that they have to go to jail. They are not tears for the victim.

    A few bad cops? Please note the massive cooperation from fellow cops they had in covering everything up.

    Fuck. The. Police.

    If Tessler can’t stand up for a 92 year old woman (about as helpless as you can get in this world), then he can damn well fall and rot in hell.

  9. #9 |  Nando | 

    Why aren’t their supervisors tried on criminal negligence? I don’t see how this could’ve happened without them knowing about it (or even encouraging it). They should also have to answer to justice.

  10. #10 |  paranoiastrksdp | 

    What I don’t get is why these three clowns weren’t also smacked with a possession of marijuana with intent to distribute charge. Seems if they were driving around with pot in their cars without a good reason (such as evidence) they’d be subject to the same laws us serfs are.

  11. #11 |  Reggie Hubbard | 

    It is a damn shame that you’re known for this issue. It’s a damn shame for two reasons: the one you mentioned and also that barely anyone else is talking about it. The Kathryn Johnston story should be known by any person interested in civil rights. Unfortunately, I find myself telling this story, and Cheye Calvo’s and Corey Maye’s and Ryan Frederick’s at least once a week at Tufts (one of the most liberal, civil-rights focused schools in the US)

    I’m really looking forward to the day when I no longer care about this blog because I no longer fear the government intruding on my rights. Unfortunately, I fear that day will never come or at least that we’re a long, long way away. Please keep it up Radley, you’re doing great work.

  12. #12 |  Boyd Durkin | 

    Where’s the obligatory press release from the cops saying that this judgement “Just made it harder and more dangerous for the police to do their jobs while making it easier for drug dealers to steal your kids and get them hooked on meth.”

    Seriously, you know they’re thinking it.

    Oh…fuck. the. police.

  13. #13 |  paranoiastrksdp | 

    Actually, does anyone know if there’s a way to get these jokers brought up on drug charges? Doing so would be sweet, sweet irony.

  14. #14 |  Euler | 

    I am hoping I’m still alive when the people retake this country. Then we can repay these bastards ten fold for every innocent life they have taken.

  15. #15 |  Zargon | 

    Because there’s two sets of law. One for us, and one for them. Their set of laws doesn’t include real punishment for any but the most egregiously immoral and inhuman acts imaginable. Such as shooting an old lady, cuffing her while she bleeds out, planting drugs in her basement, lying about it and threatening other people to lie about it too. Simply overseeing and knowing about actions such as that isn’t anywhere near bad enough to get punishment under “privileged people law”. Similarly, drugs are perfectly legal for privileged people.

  16. #16 |  paranoiastrksdp | 

    “Similarly, drugs are perfectly legal for privileged people.”

    Make that ex-privileged. C’mon man, let’s kick these monsters while they’re down.

  17. #17 |  David | 

    For this to even be an issue, we had to have reached the point where most of America is now accustomed to the notion that state agents dressed in battle garb can and will tear down the doors of private homes in the middle of the night for nothing more than mere possession of psychoactive substances.

    We have, and I’d edit that to read “the mere suspicion of possession”, but like most awful things, people assume that it only happens to those who did something to “deserve it”, and that they themselves are safe. As a species, we’re pretty stupid that way.

  18. #18 |  Whim | 

    Relatively light sentences considering the gravity of their offenses:

    Left Bullet-riddled 92 year old woman.

    Let her bleed to death rather than call for medical assistance.

    Planted drugs to make their shooting justified.

    Suborned a drug informant to lie on their behalf.

    Lied about the foregoing.

    FIVE years?? SIX years?? TEN years??

    Radley has the most depressing blog. Get me a Prozac.

  19. #19 |  JR | 

    “Whenever the legislators endeavor to take away and destroy the property of the people, or to reduce them to slavery under arbitrary power, they put themselves into a state of war with the people, who are thereupon absolved from any further obedience.” ~ John Locke

    And how we burned in the camps later, thinking: What would things have been like if every Security operative, when he went out at night to make an arrest, had been uncertain whether he would return alive and had to say good-bye to his family? Or if, during periods of mass arrests, as for example in Leningrad, when they arrested a quarter of the entire city, people had not simply sat there in their lairs, paling in terror at every bang of the downstairs door and at every step on the staircase, but had understood they had nothing left to lose and had boldly set up in the downstairs hall an ambush of half a dozen people with axes, hammers, pokers, or whatever else was at hand? […] The Organs would very quickly have suffered a shortage of officers and transport and, notwithstanding all of Stalin’s thirst, the cursed machine would have ground to a halt!”

    -The Gulag Archipelago, A. Solzhenitsyn. Chapter 1 “Arrest”, fn. 5.

  20. #20 |  Dave Krueger | 

    #3 Andrew

    You know what? These guys are scapegoats. Mind you, they deserve whatever punishment they get, and more, as the “just following orders” excuse isn’t valid at all. But their superiors, who more or less created the culture that allowed this to happen, if not outright encouraged it to happen, get off scott free with nary a punishment.

    Truer words were never spoken.

  21. #21 |  Matt | 

    Thanks for printing this, I’ve followed the case and the word “outrage” isn’t close to sufficient.

  22. #22 |  Zargon | 

    “ex-privileged”? Gimme a break. If these monsters were no longer part of the privileged class, they’d be facing life, or the chair, easy. The fact is that these guys will have about the easiest times in jail murderers ever got, they won’t serve the full terms, and I’d not even be terribly surprised to find one or more of them back working in some law-enforcement capacity 10 or 15 years down the road.

  23. #23 |  bob42 | 

    There’s dumb and dumber…

    And then there’s Drug Warrior Dumb. The former are simply stupid, while the later is stupidly deadly, proudly arrogant, typically unaccountable, often immoral, and stubbornly irresponsible.

    If you know of any pro Drug War politicians, rest assured that the above description applies to them in particular for they are they ones who and should can fix this mess, but they don’t seem to have the integrity, honesty, or guts to meet a difficult decision head on.

    What a bunch of selfish pussies.

  24. #24 |  Rhayader | 

    This is what happens when you declare “war” on American citizens. You dehumanize them. And you instill an ends-justifies-the-means, win at all costs mindset in your “warriors.” This mindset infected the entire narcotics unit at Atlanta PD. You’d have to be awfully naive to believe the problem is limited to Atlanta.

    This is so true. Like Bunny Colvin said, you call something a war, and pretty soon people are gonna be acting like soldiers.

  25. #25 |  Shay | 

    Sympathy for these pathetic excuses for human beings? None.

    The best thing to come out of this whole incident is the testimony of these creep cops. Their testimony of how the PDs and LE in this country really work in this War on the American People verifies what all the innocent victims of these insane raids have been saying for so many years. The moral bankruptcy, the corruption, and the filth of lie upon lie is rampant in our police departments all over the country and there is no way to deny it. To all SWAT members, defenders and supporters, what say you now?
    This story needs to be splashed all over the media throughout this country so ALL the people can see how the system actually works. Unfortunately, there are still so many who don’t believe this stuff could be true.

  26. #26 |  paranoiastrksdp | 

    Zargon, I was emboldened by the fact that these guys got any prison time at all. Thank you for bringing me back to cold, cruel reality.

  27. #27 |  Aresen | 

    “Smith said his moral compass failed”

    Culpable homicide, swearing a false affidavit, tampering with evidence, accessory after the fact.

    I think he’s clinched the “Understatement of the Year” award.

  28. #28 |  EH | 

    See, it wasn’t his fault. It was the broken moral compass.

  29. #29 |  MacK | 

    One reason that main stream society does not realize things like this happen is the way it is reported. Look at the headline from the link.

    “Ex-Atlanta cops get prison for drug raid killing”

    This was not a drug raid, not from the start to finish, but most people would only read that headline, and conclude so what a drug dealer was killed by cops.

    They will never know it was an old lady that was completely innocent.

    I did up-vote all that hoped they would end up in Shanksville State Prison.

  30. #30 |  DNA | 

    How many stories like this do we need before we legalize marijuana and treat it the same as alcohol? The prohibition of alcohol has the same violent history because of the same stupid type of outdated, overly-religion-influenced, moralistic vice laws.

  31. #31 |  Euler | 

    None of them got the maximum sentence under state law. Tesler and Junnier were facing 10 years and the other one was facing 12. What a joke. I forget if I read this on this blog or somewhere else, but we don’t have a justice system in this country. We have a legal system, and anyone who thinks they are the same is an idiot.

  32. #32 |  “There’s No Way that Drugs Can Be A Worse Public Menace Than This!” #2 | Why They Hate Us TV | 

    […] The name of this post says it all: Tearful Atlanta Cops Express Remorse for Shooting 92-Year-Old Kathryn Johnston, Leaving Her To Bleed… […]

  33. #33 |  Mike T | 

    Given their crimes and identities, those are all probably tacit death sentences… Not that I am complaining or anything.

  34. #34 |  Phil | 

    What is unusual about this is that they were caught and actually convicted. That they murdered someone, planted evidence and were aided in covering that up is not at all unusual but is what happens every day in all police departments. I am not surprised at the sentences of 5 to 10 years. You have to wonder about a criminal justice system which gives such light sentences to those who are supposed to uphold the law, especially when the crime is so heinous on so many levels.

  35. #35 |  Zargon | 

    “How many stories like this do we need before we legalize marijuana and treat it the same as alcohol?”

    There is no magic number X such that once the drug warriors murder X people, the drug war ends. There could be 100 more murdered, there could be 100 million more murdered, it makes no difference until there’s a fundamental change in our system of morality that permits it.

    Real change will only happen once the common man starts taking real morality seriously. Real morality being of the rational and consistent type, rather than the emotional and feel-good type. Anybody who operates under rational and consistent morality knows that the way the state conducts the drug war, and in fact, the existence of the drug war itself, is flat out evil.

  36. #36 |  ktc2 | 

    Hopefully they will be left to bleed to death on a cell floor.

    Sadly, I expect they have special “cop prisons” which are probably more like country clubs.

  37. #37 |  Cynical in CA | 

    These police officers are but three small fallen branches off the towering oak of State.

    New branches are growing every day to replace them.

    Vilifying three small branches is pathetically myopic.

    It is the root of the oak that must be struck. Starve the State. Kill it through willful neglect. Find a way.

  38. #38 |  People Respond to Incentives: Law Enforcement and No-Knock Raids | The Beacon | 

    […] “Tearful Atlanta Cops Express Remorse for Shooting 92-Year-Old Kathryn Johnston, Leaving Her to Bleed…” […]

  39. #39 |  Andrew | 

    This is what happens when you declare “war” on American citizens. You dehumanize them. And you instill an ends-justifies-the-means, win at all costs mindset in your “warriors.” This mindset infected the entire narcotics unit at Atlanta PD. You’d have to be awfully naive to believe the problem is limited to Atlanta.

    Unfortunately, this mindset has gone far beyond the police. This quote is from a TSA officer who views the images created by the strip search machine Milliliter Wave Scanner (sorry, forgot to use the official terminology) in the TSA’s pilot program at Tulsa:

    The images are not sensitive, screeners said.

    “They are not pornographic at all,” Tulsa screener Debbie Shacklett said. “I don’t look at them as people. I look at them as a thing that could have something on it.”

  40. #40 |  Kayak2U Blog » Blog Archive » State of the Union | 

    […] Radley Balko: […]

  41. #41 |  Aresen | 

    “They are not pornographic at all,” Tulsa screener Debbie Shacklett said. “I don’t look at them as people. I look at them as a thing that could have something on it.”

    I read that as “….Tulsa screamer….”. Gave it a whole other meaning.

  42. #42 |  God's Own Drunk | 

    One thing that galls me about the drug warrior is the willful cognitive dissonance they have to engage in to do their jobs. Within the last week I watched 2 shows, “Marijuana Inc.” on CNBC and “DEA” on Spike. On both shows they asked a LEO on the “front lines” of the War on Drugs similar questions.

    On “DEA” they asked an agent (after they had shown a raid where the agents were all crowing about how they had gotten THE SOURCE of marijuana; I guess no one in Detroit was able to get stoned that night) if he thought the drug war was winnable. With no hesitation he said no, as long as there was a demand for drugs someone will supply them. Then he said that’s why he does what he does, someone has to fight the war.

    On “Marijuana Inc.” they asked a California Sheriffs officer who was winning the drug war. Again, no hesitation, “They are.”

    You have to be an immoral, willful asshole to sign up for a job even you acknowledge is impossible to succeed at, that requires you to abuse the rights of your fellow man.

  43. #43 |  seeker6079 | 

    I put this on an agitator thread X months/years ago. It’s still true.

    The marijuana laws exist for a number of reasons. One of those reasons is to take something normal and useful and safe (the WD40 of the drug world) and make it illegal. Its very ubiquity and utility guarantees a demand for more and more enforcement, “necessitating” harsher laws, more police, more raids, etc. ; it also serves as a backup justification for any other mistakes they make. (A raid of the wrong house magically becomes a righteous raid because, almost inevitably, some cop is going to find a joint.)

    (Of course, I should have added, “even if they have to plant the MJ to do it”.)

    Marijuana/cannibis isn’t illegal because we need protection from it. It’s illegal because many forces within the state need it to craft a growing, authoritarian, moralistic, anti-constitutional police state. If cannabis had never existed it would be something else.

    Marijuana is not the End which necessitates the Means of an aggressive police state. It is the Means by which the End of the aggressive police state is created, justified and maintained.

  44. #44 |  Brent | 

    @1 (paranoiastrksdp): “Fuck em, I hope they get the shank.”

    Two wrongs do not make a right.

  45. #45 |  Marco Polo | 

    #15 wrote: “Because there’s two sets of law. One for us, and one for them. ”
    No. There’s just one set of laws. There’s just two sets of people: one that the laws apply to, and one that they don’t. Countries are run by elites. Always have been.

  46. #46 |  John B. | 

    As I understand the situation:
    “She was killed by officers after they used a no-knock warrant — obtained with falsified evidence — to storm into her house in search of drugs an informant had inaccurately told them were inside. Apparently thinking the officers were robbers, Johnston fired a shot through the door. Officers responded with 39 shots, five or six of which struck her.”

    The image I have is that everyone, 92-year-old victim included, traded shots through a closed door. In the excitement of the moment, the cops had what seemed like “a rabbit frozen in the headlights” and felt threatened by the shot, returning same in like manner. This is the image I have after reading the story.

    Not having a warrant seemed to be standard for these working members of a police force. My impression is that all members of that police force share the guilt for permitting this type of warrantless entry. It appears to be a standard practice, a policy procedure, to enter without a warrant. This policy is to be followed by members of the force in situations where an unidentified informant suggests that someone has something illegal on their premises.

    Duh! The burial and every claim filed by the relatives of the victim should be shared by the entire police force, not just the three cops involved ‘on site’. These guys didn’t stand alone in this raid. They have communications going all the time, they have superiors who must have been aware of the circumstances, and the punishment should be shared by everyone involved.

    Yes, those three cops fired their weapons, they were the ones on site without a warrant. However, the entire force shares responsibility for what happened – whether they were all tried in court or not. The citizens of Atlanta should be asking for a stringent review of operations policy after all is said and done.

  47. #47 |  Frank | 

    #3 A good supply of trees and rope solves all problems.

    #15 Quite true. A law enforcement badge has become a patent of nobility de facto and de jure. Which just happens to be a violation of the US Constitution. (Look it up)

    #17 Not even real suspicion, just look at what happened to Mayor Calvo’s family. The PG County Police knew damn well this was a FedEx driver’s scam but they went for the search warrant anyway. They did the mayor’s home so they could tell the Justice Department with a straight face: “See, we do it to white people, too.” It’s probably what got them off double-secret probation.

    #18 This is just the federal charges. State manslaughter etc sentencing happens in March. I wonder when their surrender date is. I’d like to send everyone in their cell block 2 cartons of cigarettes to make sure these scumbags get a warm welcome.

    #24 If police continue to act like an army of occupation, don’t be surprised if the populace plays their role in return. Vive La Resistance!

    #27 #28 How can you say your moral compass failed when you didn’t have one to begin with?

    #29 When all is said and done, the paper still has to stay on the good side of the police or else they lose their press passes. Actually telling the truth would piss off the po-po.

    #31 They should have been facing the death penalty. Read 18 USC 241 again.

    #38 Then I’m sure she wouldn’t mind posting her picture from the machine in a conspicuous place for all the airline passengers to see. Didn’t think so.

  48. #48 |  Andrew Williams | 

    So the crocs finally learned how to cry on camera, on cue.

    Boo fucking hoo.

  49. #49 |  Chui Tey | 

    I hold the leader of this group wholly responsible. Any junior officers are subject to the results of the Milgram experiment, where their judgement is overridden by that of a senior officer.

    Easy it may be for commenters to deride the guilty parties, however, I wouldn’t want to be in Tesler’s position.

  50. #50 |  Weird Stuff Online » Tearful Atlanta Cops Express Remorse for Shooting 92-Year-Old Kathryn Johnston, Leaving Her To Bleed to Death in Her Own Home While They Planted Drugs in Her Basement, Then Threatening an Informant So He Would Lie To Cover It Al | 

    […] 24 February, 2009 9:42 pm | Odd Stuff | Weird blogs best of I liked Radley Balko’s headline for this story (about three Atlanta police officers who are going to prison) so much that I copied it […]

  51. #51 |  annemg | 

    I don’t feel bad for people who do evil things because someone told them to. I’ve been fired from jobs for not “following orders” that are unethical. If that’s the worst they had to deal with if they stood up to evil, then they should have done it. No excuses.

  52. #52 |  darms | 

    @44 – Brent, no but three rights make a left… Land of the free?

  53. #53 |  billy-jay | 

    @44:

    Yeah, but if these three got killed in prison, it wouldn’t be wrong.

  54. #54 |  Timothy | 

    I think you’re pretty right about this, Radley, but I object to this:

    Officers Junnier, Smith, and Tesler are going to prison. But you could make a good case that they were only responding to incentives.

    Okay, there were bad incentives, but these guys chose to remain cops and to follow the script. If the system is that busted, and you knowingly participate you are culpable for the outcomes. These guys deserve to go down, they deserve whatever horrors they’ve sent countless harmless citizens to face in prison. They chose to become cops, and they chose to stay cops after they knew the game was dirty, burn them.

  55. #55 |  Headline of the Day « Out Of My Mind | 

    […] Tearful Atlanta Cops Express Remorse for Shooting 92-Year-Old Kathryn Johnston, Leaving Her To Bleed… […]

  56. #56 |  ktc2 | 

    @44 – Brent

    You premise assumes that killing these three murderers in uniform is ‘wrong’. I disagree. It would be justice, something unknown in this nation these days.

  57. #57 |  Pat | 

    Hold more drug warriors accountable for their atrocities and crimes against humanity and the drug war policy will come crashing down in no time at all.

  58. #58 |  Pat | 

    “This is what happens when you declare “war” on American citizens. You dehumanize them.”

    There is a program that gets aired on occasion on discovery or the History channel about training police as snipers. The instructors go to great lengths to explain how they must indoctrinate officers into the concept of “dehumanizing” the “target”. Literally, this is the way they talk about it.

    This is what the war on drugs has done to America. First they mass disenfranchise the population then they dehumanize the population. The final solution becomes a simple act of squeezing a trigger while looking down a sniper scope. The final solution is then a simple act of ignoring the deadly disease ridden over-crowded conditions in drug war POW prisons.

  59. #59 |  Continuum | 

    This kind of police corruption and lying isn’t limited to Atlanta. It is happening all over the country.

    Name one police force where the cops don’t lie, cover-up, and fabricate evidence to protect their own interests.

    The police and the war on drugs have corrupted this nation every bit as much as prohibition did.

  60. #60 |  nemo | 

    ‘Dehumanization’ of drug users has been going on since the beginning of the last century. None of this should surprise anybody.

    I suggest that people read Drug Warriors and Their Prey: From Police Power to Police State to understand just how that dehumanization process has led to the present mess of cops ‘spraying and praying’ rather than engaging in old fashioned detective work.

  61. #61 |  Spieler | The Best of the Web | 

    […] Radley Balko’s headline for this story – more. […]

  62. #62 |  Balloon Juice » Blog Archive » A Righteous Rant | 

    […] for those of you who think I am being too hard on the libertarians, let me point you to this righteous rant (mentioned here are […]

  63. #63 |  War on Drugs; Libertarismus als Geisteskrankheit; Tödlicher Umweltschutz | ars libertatis | 

    […] and even survival in an attempt to preserve the unspoiled sanctity of nature.3 Radley Balko – Tearful Atlanta Cops Express Remorse for Shooting 92-Year-Old Kathryn Johnston, Leaving Her To Bleed… [↩]Daniel J. Mitchell – Is Libertarianism a Sign of Mental Illness? [↩]Ben […]

  64. #64 |  Cops responding to incentives « Later On | 

    […] in Daily life, Drug laws, Government, Law at 1:34 pm by LeisureGuy Very good post at The Agitator, which begins: Tearful Atlanta Cops Express Remorse for Shooting 92-Year-Old […]

  65. #65 |  doubleplanet | 

    The absurdity of calling this police-state strategy a “war” is well illustrated in a headline from _The Onion_:

    Drugs Win War On Drugs

  66. #66 |  reform on marijuana | 

    i am featuring this article at my blog here in about 20 minutes!

  67. #67 |  growup | 

    Hey Euler, F***k you

    Less than one percent of the inmates are murderers and rapists.
    Most are in on the same consensual crime, that wouldn’t be a crime or even a statistic if it sold for 10.00 an ounce what it’s worth on the white market.

    I’m sick of you and those like you who watch a movie and then judge everyone by the hollywood stereotype portrayed.

    Had this country stoodup and grew up and honored the Constitution and Bill of Rights and allowed blacks and Latinos the same freedoms to get an education and a job as you have been afforded then they would not have had to resort to selling narcotics to have the basics of life.

    Don’t forget that the main reason hemp was outlawed was so the owner’s of the forests could cut them down and make rayon.

  68. #68 |  growup | 

    Hey Euler, what do you mean “when the people retake this country”
    are you from overseas? Most of those that wear a badge are as honest as you are. They are just taking orders from their bosses who take orders from their’s. This country is run by 300 families who have intermarried for the past 200+ years and own everything that is worth owning and see you and I as an “useless eater”.

    There the ones everyone should be angry with. They need to be routed for the plague they are.

  69. #69 |  Atlanta | 

    Fuck those guys.. They were crying because they got caught. Bless that old ladies heart. Can you imagine what kind of terror she was living at that moment. I hope they rape those assholes on a daily basis. Thats what the blue line deserves. In Atlanta (Fulton County) and Decatur (dekalb county) these cops are barely more that a bunch of gangsta’s. You can not trust these guys for any reason, they are dangerous..The GBI obviously don’t exist or they are just as corrupt as Dekalb and Fulton cops they couldn’t catch the clap in a whore house…..

  70. #70 |  The Agitator » Blog Archive » This Is Getting Annoying | 

    […] someone at Fark has plagiarized my headline on the Kathryn Johnston story. Digg it |  reddit |  del.icio.us |  […]

  71. #71 |  jdogg92056 | 

    “Tearful Atlanta Cops Express Remorse”… They’re only tearful and expressing remorse because they got caught. That’s the reason. That’s the only reason. Actually, they shouldn’t be going to prison. They should be going to the gallows.

  72. #72 |  Virtual Memories » Unrequired Reading: Feb. 27, 2009 | 

    […] Sometimes you just gotta call evil evil. […]

  73. #73 |  warren | 

    GOOD I hope they rot and go insane.

  74. #74 |  farouk | 

    I wish we lived in China. After the tearful apology to the people of china and to their families these clowns would be taken out back and shot, then their organs would be sold and then their supervisor would be forced to commit ritual suicide.

  75. #75 |  dispatches from TJICistan » Blog Archive » Our Boys in Blue (”The War on Some Drugs” edition) | 

    […] http://www.theagitator.com/2009/02/24/te… […]

  76. #76 |  Right to Bleed » The Tragedy of the War on (Some People) Who Do (Some) Drugs | 

    […] The Atlanta case of 92-year-old Kathryn Johnston received a lot of press – she was killed by police when they illegally entered her home, which led to a big cover up by the cops. The Agitator had the best headline about the cops’ trial, which just came to a close: Tearful Atlanta Cops Express Remorse for Shooting 92-Year-Old Katheryn Johnston, Leaving Her To Blee… […]

  77. #77 |  Right to Bleed » Making Criminals to Make Money | 

    […] me, though. A traffic ticket, however benign it might feel compared to, say, a government-initiated home invasion and murder, is still a cop pointing a gun to your head and taking your time and your […]

  78. #78 |  Don’t Take Too Long In The Bathroom. The Next Guy In Line May Be A Cop. | Popehat | 

    […] family pet (hat tip: Jag), but that’s old hat, and anyway it’s Atlanta, where the police shoot nonagenarian ladies. So what’s another […]

  79. #79 |  dax | 

    maybe if they weren’t such fucking sheep going along with what the big bad senior officers say and do, this wouldn’t happen. People, regardless of what it is they do for a living, need to think for themselves and do what it is they think is right. Especially cops, they’re supposed to “serve and protect” instead they’re the ones we need to watch out for because they’ve turned into a bunch of powertripping fucks who feel the need to serve “justice” which automatically means DRUGS ARE BAD OH NO lets shoot an old lady and plant drugs in her house. Fucking tools

  80. #80 |  GT | 

    Positions in the storm-trooper dress-up corps have always attracted nutjobs – so there is no surprise when they behave like nutjobs. The more the position requires one to dress up like something out of “Star Wars meets the Village People”, the nutjobbier the results.

    I wouldn’t want to be these guys; their names are out there, and the budgetary situation for most municipalities is going to get MUCH worse over the next generation (and of course once you’re no longer useful to the Machine, it will burn you… they won’t get protected after their incarceration). I have no doubt there is already an OrgA pool with their names on it: if so, they’re already dead.

    Cheerio

    GT

  81. #81 |  Hugh Fitzimmons | 

    In Response to Brent, #44:

    “Two wrongs do not make a right.”

    I could not agree with you more; fuck these bastards, I hope they get the shank. That will create three rights to help offset their numerous wrongs.

Leave a Reply