Chrysler: Thanks, Suckers.

Tuesday, December 23rd, 2008

Chrysler spends $100K on a full-page ad in USA Today thanking American taxpayers for a bailout most of the public opposed, Congress never approved, and that you average taxpayer had no choice but to help fund, lest he go to jail.

Doesn’t exactly come off as heartfelt, does it?

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37 Responses to “Chrysler: Thanks, Suckers.”

  1. #1 |  anne | 

    F@$K Chrysler. We should have let them die in the 80s.

  2. #2 |  Ginger Dan | 

    Is anyone else beginning to think the legal and moral case for not paying federal taxes grows stronger by the second?

  3. #3 |  andrew | 

    WSJ per Blogmaverick.

  4. #4 |  OldGreyOne | 

    People are starting to get angry. It may take some time for fat, lazy America to get off its’ ass, but there could be some demonstrations in early 2009. Next couple of years may be interesting.

  5. #5 |  Ben | 

    OldGreyOne: One can only hope.

  6. #6 |  thomasblair | 

    Ginger Dan,

    The case is already compelling. It’s just that I’m not willing to subject myself and my family to the violence that inevitably follows.

  7. #7 |  Ginger Dan | 

    OldGreyOne,

    I often think about what the catalyst for the next “revolution” will be. I still think nothing will happen until the desperate bring their plight to the front door of the apathetic, but once the two merge, things might actually start to happen.

  8. #8 |  angulimala | 

    I don’t know. Thanking people when u don’t have to is often taken as a sign of sincerity.

    Whether we wanted to or not we just saved their butts.

  9. #9 |  Ben R. | 

    The bailout is a fitting end to the Bush presidency really – equal parts cynicism and authoritarianism.

    Money extracted from congress for one purpose was appropriated to another by the executive under its own rather disturbing interpretation of the constitution and the law in question – but only enough to push the decision of ultimately killing or saving the automakers on to the lap of the next guy.

    I look forward to seeing another indeterminate number of loans given freely to private industry by the executive via TARP that will expire or be too little to sustain said industries after exactly January 20th.

  10. #10 |  Mattocracy | 

    This blog post made me madder than the previous puppycide and prosecuter misconduct posts. This is like breaking up with Lee Iacocca’s daughter, only to find out later that she gave you the clap.

  11. #11 |  AV | 

    Or not.

    We (the taxpayers) made 500 million or so on the first Chrysler bailout. All those jobs have been retained for 20 years, and they make a pretty good product. My wife’s Jeep Grand Cherokee is reliable and does what we need.

    This bailout may be different. I don’t think the recovery is right around the corner, and it’s not clear if the automakers can restructure their way to profitability.

  12. #12 |  pc | 

    I’m still a bit more miffed at the $200 billion that was given to bail out the hedge funds. Just in time for year end bonuses!

  13. #13 |  Cynical In CA | 

    “… that you average taxpayer had no choice but to help fund, lest he go to jail.”

    Radley! That’s my boy! We’ll make an anarchist out of you yet!

    Point of clarification: taxpayers do not face jail for not paying taxes, taxpayers face death. For if they do not kill you, then at some point by definition you complied.

    “The penalty for resistance is always death.” Mike Gogulski

    http://www.nostate.com

  14. #14 |  Cynical In CA | 

    “Whether we wanted to or not we just saved their butts.”

    Until March 31, 2009. Then they go bankrupt anyway, but not after making off with their share of the loot.

  15. #15 |  nemo | 

    The last time this happened (1979), the loans were made to Chrysler to prop it up long enough to make the M1 Abrams tank…and only incidentally to make civilian cars. What do we get this time?

  16. #16 |  Rich J | 

    Just to up the irony factor, I think that Chrysler should spend some of the most recent bailout booty to send each taxpayer a little “Thank you” note instead of the ad, which is so impersonal. Just think of the money that would waste, as we continue to reward inefficiency (not to mention corporate greed, incompetency and lack of accountability).

    If you really wanted to get pissed off, you should realize that Chrysler will be able to deduct the cost of that ad from its corporate taxes. Reducing its corporate tax liability while rubbing it in our faces. It’s the old double-screwgy to the taxpayers!

  17. #17 |  Hank | 

    See a little something I can up with here:

    http://somethingyoucanuse.blogspot.com/2008/12/chrysler-thanks-america.html

  18. #18 |  Robin | 

    I think that skywriting a thank you message would be more romantic.

  19. #19 |  Edwin Sheldon | 

    @ #14 | Cynical In CA:
    Exactly. This bailout is a temporary effort aimed at making Obama deal with this problem because Bush doesn’t feel like it. He knows Chrysler is likely to fail anyway, but doesn’t care that he has spent billions in taxpayer money (plus much more in the interest on the staggering national debt) so that he doesn’t have to deal with it. And why should he care? It’s not like his approval rating can get much lower.

  20. #20 |  Mattocracy | 

    Good to see that someone else reads nostate.com. Now I know Cynical and I are on the same watch list.

  21. #21 |  Mike Gogulski | 

    Cynical in CA and Mattocracy: you’re both on my watchlist. Now be good! :)

  22. #22 |  Jason | 

    Hey Chrysler!
    You’re not welcome.
    http://rightklik.net

  23. #23 |  Jason | 

    Let Chrysler have a piece of your mind…here:
    http://blog.chryslerllc.com/comment.do

    http://rightklik.net

  24. #24 |  supercat | 

    The automakers in trouble because they promised the unions a supply of pension revenues that their sales were insufficient to supply. The only way the automakers can regain solvency is to abrogate those promises. The effect of the bailout is to make taxpayers supply the money that the automakers promised to supply but were unable to do so. I see no moral justification for such a thing.

  25. #25 |  pam | 

    there were no comments on the “give Chrysler a piece of your mind” link. I wonder if none of them passed inspection

  26. #26 |  Matt | 

    thomasblair:
    “It’s just that I’m not willing to subject myself and my family to the violence that inevitably follows.”

    Billy Beck, years ago:
    …”they use the things we love — families, careers, possessions, etc. — against us. This is the fundamental principle on which it all works.”
    http://www.two–four.net/weblog.php?id=P1202

    Our entire lives are being held for ransom.

  27. #27 |  jakeJohnson | 

    yep, cause our economy is in perfect shape right now to handle ~3 million or so jobs lost from the big 3 tanking. You libertarians are kinda funny, blaming the government for everything. Such an easy scapegoat.

  28. #28 |  billy-jay | 

    The comments on this post have made my day a little brighter.

  29. #29 |  Cynical In CA | 

    Wow, the stateless wonder makes a personal appearance! Good luck in your new status Mike, you’re a brave person.

  30. #30 |  Matt | 

    jakejohnson:
    “You libertarians are kinda funny, blaming the government for everything.”

    Who here mentioned blaming government for everything, except you?

  31. #31 |  Cynical In CA | 

    #27 | jakeJohnson | December 23rd, 2008 at 10:09 pm
    yep, cause our economy is in perfect shape right now to handle ~3 million or so jobs lost from the big 3 tanking. You libertarians are kinda funny, blaming the government for everything. Such an easy scapegoat.

    Last time I checked, the truth was a valid defense, Jake.

    You statists are kinda funny, exonerating the government for everything. Such an easy idol.

    Those 3 million jobs are a waste of labor resources. The U.S. auto industry is a complete misallocation of resources propped up by the fraud of the finance industry for at least the last 20 years. The automakers need to be forced into bankruptcy so the capital and labor can be reallocated to productive uses instead of having more money thrown down a black hole, assuming that there is a demand for 3 million new jobs in ANY industry in the world now.

    The State, via its muscle the government, has created a bubble in PEOPLE. There are simply too many people on Earth to be provided for in the manner in which humans would like to live. The American way of life since at least 1971 has been a complete fraud — embezzlement from future generations who are not even alive to scrutinize the books or defend themselves.

    It would be fantastically amusing, your bemoaning the loss of 3 million useless jobs, if it weren’t so ominous what the near future portends as a result of the evil machinations of the State and its dominion over all individuals.

    Your self-interest would be better served by educating yourself and others as to the logic and sense of libertarianism (or my favorite strand free-market anarchism) than clinging to the obsolete and incredibly dangerous delusions of statist ideology.

  32. #32 |  Mike Gogulski | 

    @Cynical: “Stateless wonder”… gotta get me a T-shirt with that on it :) Cheers!

  33. #33 |  KBCraig | 

    “I cannot undertake to lay my finger on that article of the Constitution which granted a right to Congress of expending, on objects of benevolence, the money of their constituents.”
    — James Madison, who wrote that “G** D***** piece of paper”

    Or, as recorded in the Annals of Congress in 1794:
    “Mr. Madison wished to relieve the sufferers, but was afraid of establishing a dangerous precedent, which might hereafter be perverted to the countenance of purposes very different from those of charity. He acknowledged, for his own part, that he could not undertake to lay his finger on that article in the Federal Constitution which granted a right of Congress of expending, on objects of benevolence, the money of their constituents.”

    Dangerous precedent, indeed.

  34. #34 |  Robert | 

    People are starting to get angry. It may take some time for fat, lazy America to get off its’ ass, but there could be some demonstrations in early 2009. Next couple of years may be interesting.

    You aren’t the only one that is thinking this. Queue the basing of troops within the US to… help out in case of terrorist attacks or other national emergencies. Oh yeah and to quell civil disorder.

    I make a prediction that within the next four years, martial law will be declared somewhere within the US.

  35. #35 |  Comrade Dread | 

    I blame Aaron Burr. For not shooting Hamilton 30 years sooner.

  36. #36 |  Tokin42 | 

    Last month police tore down a section of privacy fence in my folks back yard looking for a guy who had stabbed someone in a nearby neighborhood. 6 cops and what looked like a dutch shepherd came crashing through and ran into my folks dog, a very high energy 2 yr old australian shepherd. He’ a great dog but his desire to play overrules everything with him. He’s barely out of his pup stage and he thinks every dog he meets wants to run and roughhouse. They have a pretty large yard and he came running at them at a dead run for awhile so they had a chance to think about it. He went right for their dog and stopped ready to play. My dad said the officers dog seemed up to playing but the other cops were kinda busy. 30 seconds later when my dad made it outside the cops were trying to keep the two dogs separated. They asked him if he would bite and then politely asked him to take the dog inside while they worked.

    When dad called to tell me that the cops broke down his fence the first thought I had was they shot my folks dog. How sad is it that a situation like this where cops DON’T shoot the dog is an incredible story? Cop shoots dog stories are so frequent that I felt compelled to send a letter of thanks for the officers using good judgment when they were already obviously amped up a bit. Until people start paying attention to this and making their voices heard on the local level this is not going to stop.

  37. #37 |  Tokin42 | 

    HA, wrong thread, I am such a tool….

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