McCain: “Nevermind”

Friday, September 26th, 2008

John McCain’s weird, drama-queen, “it’s all about me” moment just came to a crushing halt, as he has apparently backed down and agreed to attend the debate in Mississippi tonight.

I’m not sure what McCain gained from all the histrionics. The guy who just months ago said he didn’t really know all that much about the economy apparently expected voters to buy the idea that Congress was waiting to act on the financial crisis until it could first consult his expertise.

He canceled an appearance on David Letterman’s show, apparently calling Letterman himself to apologize, explaining that he was “racing to the airport” to catch a last-minute flight back to D.C. Unfortunately for McCain, Letterman then busted him taping an interview with Katie Couric, still in New York, at the same time McCain was supposed to be taping his appearance on Letterman. The whole episode exposed this for what it was: a cynical stunt. McCain didn’t “suspend” his campaign to tackle the financial crisis. He just claimed that’s what he was doing, then used that claim to campaign about what a great leader he is for suspending his campaign.

McCain’s “come together” moment also seems to have infused with partisanship the bailout negotiations that until that point had been pretty bipartisan (though barreling toward a potentially disastrous consensus). Once McCain arrived, the negotiations soured, as both sides then become conscious of how their positions might be spun and interpreted in light of McCain’s posturing.

Oddly, if McCain’s clumsy politics ends up inadvertently scuttling the bailout, it may well end up doing more for the cause of limited government than anything he has ever done intentionally.

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17 Responses to “McCain: “Nevermind””

  1. #1 |  thomasblair | 

    I’m amused by the whole thing. It was a stupid move. He left himself open for Obama’s shot across the bow (“presidents need to multitask”). The polity called him on his bullshit. Even Letterman called his bluff. He looks like a buffoon now. And that’s fine with me.

  2. #2 |  Jeremy | 

    If McCain is in fact solely responsible for derailing this bailout, more power to him. It would be his greatest accomplishment to date.

  3. #3 |  Matt | 

    I’m happy that he threw a wrench in the Bailout talks, whether intentional or not. I’m not sure how the rest of America will feel about the events that occured this week. Just because agitator readers can see through the bullshit of candidates doesn’t mean everyone else will. After all, America is going to vote one of two buffoons into office no matter what. A lot of voters are coming around and realizing that the bailout is bogus. I don’t think anyone will know for sure how the public will judge McCain until after the debate tonight.

  4. #4 |  Honeyko | 

    > John McCain’s weird, drama-queen, “it’s all about me” moment
    > just came to a crushing halt, as he has apparently backed down
    > and agreed to attend the debate in Mississippi tonight.

    It’s can’t-help-being-partisan bag-over-one’s-head nonsense like this which prompts me to be very skeptical of most of your writing outside of judicial affairs.

    McCain is back on the campaign because the meeting he went to Washington to request achieved the desired result: Delay the bill. Now, it’s the weekend. The markets will be closed and there’s no impetus to burn the Saturday Midnight Oil when Monday will do. So, debate Friday evening and then back.

    > I’m not sure what McCain gained from all the histrionics.

    He gained thousands of screaming telephone calls from outraged constituents. (Unlike Pelozi, Schumer and Frank, he actually has taxpayers in his voting-base.)

    > The guy who just months ago said he didn’t really know all that
    > much about the economy apparently expected voters to buy the
    > idea that Congress was waiting to act on the financial crisis until
    > it could first consult his expertise.

    Do you really think Congress, run by the Democrats on both sides, would have done so if it didn’t want to? When they could otherwise tell him to go stuff it, making him look pretty stupid and impotent?

    You know, McCain isn’t the only person in Congress getting the thousands of screaming telephone calls.

    > McCain’s “come together” moment also seems to have infused
    > with partisanship the bailout negotiations that until that point
    > had been pretty bipartisan (though barreling toward a potentially
    > disastrous consensus). Once McCain arrived, the negotiations
    > soured, as both sides then become conscious of how their
    > positions might be spun and interpreted in light of McCain’s posturing.

    According to all the best squishy soft-left spin-factory intermediaries you consult, I’m sure that’s exactly the way is appears to you. But the truth of the matter is that the House Republican minority (i.e., the politicians with the most taxpayers in their support bases) were already beginning to shit bricks hard and fast.

    Karl Denninger went viral, and the telephones lines screamed “Nay!” 300:1.

  5. #5 |  Danno49 | 

    What’s more disturbing than the fact that he was caught red-handed at this prevarication is that it doesn’t seem like he thought he would get caught at it.

    Is it massive egomania or just plain stupidity? Probably a combination of the two.

  6. #6 |  Dave Krueger | 

    This seems to fit very well with my assessment that McCain would decorate the walls of the city with babies skewered on up-ended spears if he thought it would give him a better chance of winning the election.

    Anyone with half a brain would be smart enough to steer clear of being president. It has to be an extremely tough job (if done right) thanklessly rewarded with a pathetically small salary. On the other hand, we will never run short of enthusiastic, but inept candiates who are motivated solely by what the job does for their ego. And those are the ones who manage to get on the ballot and get elected every time.

  7. #7 |  Honeyko | 

    He’s an ordinary politician, Danno; be thankful he’s blundering in the correction direction this week — because if he hadn’t done what he did, there’s a more than decent chance this whole country would be horsefucked right now.

    (“Drama queen”? Last I recall, Obama was still a senator; does he, like, uh, intend to be around to vote on that sucker, or anything? Look: If you’re going to tar one, tar all that apply.)

  8. #8 |  Honeyko | 

    > It has to be an extremely tough job (if done right) thanklessly
    > rewarded with a pathetically small salary.

    You’re kidding, right?

    Money falls from the sky as soon as these guys land in Washington; they can’t take bribes [ahem] “campaign-contributions” fast enough.

  9. #9 |  ktc2 | 

    Hey honeyko which part of the PI is your wife from?

    I’m assuming here but my wife calls me honeyko, asawako, mahalko all the time.

  10. #10 |  scott in phx | 

    then there is Obama of “they’ll call me if they need me”.

    uh, “chosen one”, aren’t you a Senator too? oh thats right, you just think you should be paid a Senators’ salary to support your run for the Presidency.

    then the hypcrites on the left who complain about McCains’ missed votes during the election cycle have the audacity to complain because he thinks its more important to be part of the political process. gad! the left is deranged.

    of course, no one is surprised that Obama wasn’t interested in participating in an actual political “responsibility”, he probably would’ve just voted “present” anyway. just like with the “stimulus” package that he takes credit for but didn’t even show up to vote for the ONLY thing Obama is interested in is getting elected.

    i would have preferred that McCain stand up immediately and oppose this bailout (can anyone name any Democrats that have) but no matter how it dies it can’t die too soon. let’s all hope that it does no matter who wins this election.

  11. #11 |  SusanK | 

    I found the notion of “suspending the campaign” to do “important work” in Washington suspect from the beginning. The whole POINT of campaigning is to explain to voters/constituents/people what you will do if you are elected. His campaign provided him ample opportunity to make his position on the bailout known. Obviously he prefers back-room dealing to transparency (which is why he picked Palin).

  12. #12 |  Honeyko | 

    > Obviously he prefers back-room dealing to transparency
    > (which is why he picked Palin).

    And Obama kept everybody breathlessly awaiting the internet announcement of his veep pick in the loop right to the second as promised, eh? Riiiight.

  13. #13 |  Danno49 | 

    Honeyko – my point was that usually these assholes (pols) are a little more careful in concealing their bullshit. I am fully aware that they are all liars of the highest order. They are just usually smarter about it than this turd.

  14. #14 |  The Other Jeff | 

    Now, it’s the weekend. The markets will be closed and there’s no impetus to burn the Saturday Midnight Oil when Monday will do.

    Most of the government’s moves regarding the financial crisis have happened during weekends.

  15. #15 |  Mikestermike | 

    Methinks the man is Bipolar. Lithium or Lamictal is the order for the day for the man. Presidency is not.

  16. #16 |  Lubey | 

    Its really no wonder Obama isn’t too concerned. He and his cronies are pretty much kneck deep in this mess.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H5tZc8oH–o

  17. #17 |  Wally | 

    Stupid candidates…stupid voters.

    How in the world can anyone not see McCain and Sarah for who they really are?

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