Morning Links

Monday, September 15th, 2008
  • See if you can see what’s missing in this story about a Jackson, Mississippi man who was arrested for shooting at police during a drug raid.
  • Puppycide in Colorado.
  • MTV, which can be pretty nauseating with its fashionable environmentalism, recently shot a couple of reality shows in Costa Rica, and apparently trashed the place, then left without cleaning up.
  • George Will heaps praise on Russ Roberts new book, a novella that incorporates Leonard Read’s classic essay, “I, Pencil” into a romance.
  • Two wrongful drug arrests in Tennessee, based in part on bad information from a confidential informant, who has now gone missing. One of the falsely arrested lost her job, her home, and had to file for bankruptcy.
  • Mmmm. Hot beef sundae.
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  • 13 Responses to “Morning Links”

    1. #1 |  KBCraig | 

      Hmmm… where are the drug charges?

    2. #2 |  John Harrold | 

      Speaking a someone who has lived in the tropics, the only real problem I can see from the photos of what MTV left behind are the plastics (like the blue tarp). The heat and humidity will take care of the rest.

    3. #3 |  Shay | 

      Regarding Drug Raids:

      Check out the Washington Post –Sunday Metro Section
      Marc Fisher’s column

      Love the way he calls it “SWAT FEVER” It’s a real epidemic!

    4. #4 |  nemo | 

      From the Puppycide article:

      “”They had permission to be in the house, they did nothing wrong,” Hogan said.

      And how did they gain entry? Who allowed them inside?

      “Gonzales’ children let police into the house to look for the fugitive while Gonzales showered, she said. Her daughter put Gemini, a 2-year-old Labrador-pit bull in the bathroom with her to keep him out of the way, Gonzales said. Police opened the bathroom door and the dog pounced. Hogan said the officer took the necessary steps for self-defense. “Sometimes that’s the only option they have,” he said. “It’s just one of those things.”

      They intimidate kids to let them into the house…as if kids would know about the 4th Amendment and the right to say “No!”. They’re about to invade the man’s bathroom, with someone obviously in the shower. The dog is in the bathroom to keep it out of the way, it sees an intruder opening the bathroom door, and does what every good dog is supposed to…and is shot for its’ diligence.

      And the cops just shrug their shoulders and remark that it couldn’t be helped?

      They better pray they don’t become the recipients of similar ‘oopsies!’ in the near future. I can just see a bloodbath coming…

    5. #5 |  The Other Jeff | 

      Within days of Kitts’ arrest, the charges against him were dropped and he received an apology from Smith because an internal probe indicated that he’d been misidentified.

      One of the task force agents involved in Kitts’ case, a Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office deputy assigned to the task force named Wanda Watson, was removed from the task force because of Kitts’ arrest.

      Wow, that’s almost…refreshing. But then…

      “I had some doubt and that doubt made me want to err on the side of caution,” Smith said.

      Pity he wasn’t willing to err a little more at the beginning of the investigation. You know, before the whole loss-of-job/loss-of-house/bankruptcy thing.

      So where does Mr. Smith fall on the authority-run-amok scale? Jackbooted thug with a heart of gold?

    6. #6 |  Fortisquince | 

      See if you can see what’s missing in this story about a Jackson, Mississippi man who was arrested for shooting at police during a drug raid.

      Umm… drugs?

    7. #7 |  dave smith | 

      What is missing from the Jackson story is a menton of the dead dog.

      Surely the cops found a dog to shoot.

    8. #8 |  Eric | 

      This was a peaceful entry; there was no surprise that the police were there and no need for them to act immediately. The kids put the dog into the bathroom to keep it out of the cops’ way. Then the police went into that room and promptly shot the dog. The “bite” on the officer’s hand apparently didn’t break the skin but was enough to force him to immediately kill the pet.

      At the very least, the police could have an SOP where on peaceful entry they ask a family whether they have any pets, and if so they ask them to please move their dogs to the backyard or some defined space. Or the officers could carry pepper spray like meter readers or mail carriers.

      Every one of these stories is just awful. Thanks and keep ‘em coming, Radley; it’s the only way we can hope to see any change.

    9. #9 |  Lucy | 

      Not even a sorry or a we regret that we “had to” shoot the dog. Just claiming that “it’s just one of those things.” Nice.

      Did the woman in the shower even know the cops were there? How young were these children?

      Another poor dog casualty, thanks to cops being idiots. Why don’t they carry mace or something? Or ask if there’s a dog?

    10. #10 |  treefroggy | 

      “It is unclear, Scott said, whether police shot Burton or if he was shot by one of his associates.”

      You mean there were “associates” in the house, but “no other arrests” ?

      Hmmmmmmm

    11. #11 |  SJE | 

      Quote from the puppycide story: “Sometimes that’s the only option they have,” he said. “It’s just one of those things.”

      Gotta love that reasoning. As long as you aren’t thinking too much it covers pretty much everything. At least, when the only option you have is “shoot everyone.”

      What I’d like to see is the family suing the LEOs, because it REALLY is “the only option they have.”

    12. #12 |  Steve Verdon | 

      At the very least, the police could have an SOP where on peaceful entry they ask a family whether they have any pets, and if so they ask them to please move their dogs to the backyard or some defined space. Or the officers could carry pepper spray like meter readers or mail carriers.

      Or ask to have the dog put on a leash. A leash with a prong/pinch collar and even a child can usually restrain most large breed dogs. Also, wait until an adult can come to the door. I mean, really, firing a handgun in a house full with children present. Dogs often take their cues from their owners/humans as they are supposed to be the “pack” leaders. Cops coming into my house would have absolutely nothing to fear from my dogs so long as I was calm. My dogs would treat the cops as guests. This dog did not have to die. The cops screwed up.

      Oh, and note the cops expect the dog to behave in a manner that requires more intelligence than the cops apparently have. Does one have to flunk a test to get on the force and get the heavy weaponry?

    13. #13 |  Andrew | 

      What! Corruption and lies in a Tennessee drug case?

      Actually I’d say I’d say they got off extremely lucky. Just ask Lester Eugene Siler about Tennessee drug warriors.

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