Another Exoneration

Friday, July 25th, 2008

This time, in Ohio, though the man is still a few steps away from being released.

And there may be more on the way.

McClendon’s case was highlighted in “Test of Convictions,” a five-day series in January that exposed flaws in Ohio’s prisoner DNA-testing program and identified 30 cases that were prime candidates for testing.

The Dispatch built files on the more than 300 prisoners who applied for testing, almost all of whom had previously been denied. The newspaper re-examined them with the Ohio Innocence Project’s team of professors and law students.

DNA Diagnostics Center, a Cincinnati-area lab, volunteered to test the cases free. Prosecutors and judges have since granted testing in 15 cases, more than had been tested in the five-year history of the program.

McClendon’s is the first result.

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9 Responses to “Another Exoneration”

  1. #1 |  Matt | 

    Flawed DNA testing by our government…

    There is a lot flawed scientific testing that our local and federal governments do. These are the same people who have “scientifically” proven that there is no medical application for Marijuana, that second hand smoke causes cancer, they over exaggerate the warming tends of the Earth (I’m not denying climate change, just its severity) and countless other “scientific truths” that they use to justify their ever expanding policing, regulation, an incarceration of us. They have substituted divine right issued by the word of God (words that they created), with a divine right issued by scientific testing (that they do in their laboratories).

    I’m glad that the inquisition won’t be able to keep you behind bars Mr. McClendon. Many others in history have not been so fortunate.

  2. #2 |  ktc2 | 

    What is your guesstimate on the percentage of persons currently incarcerated (Fed/State/Any) in the USA that should not be there because they are either innocent of the charge or have harmed no other’s person or property?

    I’m going with 70%. I figure half of all those convicted of a real (i.e. non victimless) crime are actually innocent of it. The extra 20% I put for all those convicted of victimless crimes.

  3. #3 |  Michael Chaney | 

    Victimless crimes drive property crime, though, so it’s difficult to really sort it out. For instance, if the cost of cocaine were subject to simple market pressures and getting high cost a couple bucks, fewer people would be knocking off liquor stores or committing petty theft in order to score their drugs for the evening. Dealers would quit killing each other over that commodity (although I have no doubt many would move on to the next black market and continue the same sort of business).

    I’m not excusing such behavior at all. But ultimately we’re playing a game of statistics where we can raise or lower the chance that someone will commit a crime based on other variables. That’s the point of after school programs and such, too, just trying to change variables and alter percentages.

  4. #4 |  Michael Pack | 

    Michael,what your describing is 1920’s Chicago..Some people never learn.

  5. #5 |  Tokin42 | 

    1st result ends with a conviction being overturned (eventually), can’t imagine why the DA’s and judges were hesitant to allow the testing.

  6. #6 |  Steve Verdon | 

    Matt,

    You forgot the crisis, plague, scourge, war, epidemic rhetorical aspect of this too. The language of science is used to give their emotional rhetoric a patina of objectivity and respectability. But in the end it is basically chicken little politics where the politician says the sky is falling…so grant us politicians a bunch more power so we can keep the rest of you from causing the sky to fall.

  7. #7 |  A. D. Jackson | 

    Hello,

    A new Internet radio show “Change of Venue” premiered in the Chicago area on July 14, 2008, coincidentally the anniversary of Bastille Day, at 11:00 a.m. Chicago time. See http://www.njcdlp.org/Change_of_Venue.html . A new “Change of Venue” (COV) show will be broadcast every two weeks at the same time, and both new topics and tuning in information appear on the Website.

    Both COV and the Citizens’ Forum on Judicial Accountabilty which preceded it (see Website) are a response to a compelling national problem. Retired Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’ Connor has been heavily involved in, and other judges have spoken out about judicial independence and the dangers of any further monitoring of the judiciary. And compelling arguments have been made on the first issue. There exists what some term the Sandra O’ Connor Project (SOP) a series of conferences extolling to other judges, leaders in business and the media, and civic leaders the point of view of many prominent judges. Part of SOP also educates high school students about the three branches of government. The National Judicial Conduct and Disability Law Project (NJCDLP) called the Citizens’ Forum which was held in Washington D. C. this past May 15 so that all voices could be heard on these and related issues.

    NJCDLP will prepare and submit a Report to Congress to the Judiciary Committees of both the House and Senate once the new Congress and President are sworn in. The next COV program will discuss the Citizens’ Forum, its objectives, and some distinguished members’ comments on their expectations and how well they were fulfilled. Other shows will feature some very interesting witnesses at the Forum, and then later some grassroots advocates with their refelections on the state of the judiciary and proposed solutions. Time will be allowed for audience participation. And maybe your insight or comment may make its way into the forthcoming Congressional Report. Stay tuned.

    Andrew D. Jackson
    Co-Producer
    “Change of Venue”

  8. #8 |  Andrew Williams | 

    Fuck. Tha. Po-lice.

    “I said it once before but it bears repeating….”

  9. #9 |  Desventuras | 

    Flawed DNA testing by our government…

    There is a lot flawed scientific testing that our local and federal governments do. These are the same people who have “scientifically” proven that there is no medical application for Marijuana, that second hand smoke causes cancer, they over exaggerate the warming tends of the Earth (I’m not denying climate change, just its severity) and countless other “scientific truths” that they use to justify their ever expanding policing, regulation, an incarceration of us. They have substituted divine right issued by the word of God (words that they created), with a divine right issued by scientific testing (that they do in their laboratories).

    I’m glad that the inquisition won’t be able to keep you behind bars Mr. McClendon. Many others in history have not been so fortunate.

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