Yer’ Monday Morning Roundup of Raid Stories

Monday, June 23rd, 2008
  • Another case of puppycide.
  • Judge in California reinstates a $75,000 punitive damages award to a victim of a wrong-door raid.
  • Law enforcement groups in Ohio rally against a proposed Castle Doctrine law. Presumably, such a law would not include the right to shoot a police officer who enters your home lawfully. So why would they oppose allowing people to defend their homes from criminals?
  • Here’s a police recruitment video for a department in Georgia. One former police chief I interviewed for my Overkill paper told me when he reluctantly agreed to assemble a SWAT team, he brought his entire department together and asked for volunteers, then immediately disqualified everyone who raised his hand. He explain that the guys dying to be on the SWAT team are the last the guys you want serving on the the SWAT. Contrast that line of thought with the video above, which uses the SWAT team as a recruiting tool for the entire department. Think about the type of people that’s going to draw into your applicant pool.
  • The Fairfield Minuteman newspaper criticizes the Easton, Connecticut police department for its typical silence following the drug raid shooting death of unarmed Gonzalo Guizan.
  • Now: Wrong door immigration raids, too. Serves ‘em right for looking like people who might be illegal.
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  • 17 Responses to “Yer’ Monday Morning Roundup of Raid Stories”

    1. #1 |  Observant Bystander | 

      I didn’t hear the police announce themselves before entering the homes in the recruitment video.

    2. #2 |  Jim Henley | 

      I’m starting to think the Warren-Court era is going to appear, retrospectively, as a brief Golden Age of police as subordinate to the citizenry. In most of history, police work has been autocratic, self-serving and corrupt. That’s true even in most of American history. I did a fair amount of skimming through SLAVERY BY ANOTHER NAME last week in Borders, which was all about how police in the South spent literally decades using arbitrary arrest powers to capture and sell tens of thousands of black men into servitude. And there were all the abuses that led to the Exclusionary Rule and Gideon in the first place. But since the late 1970s, we appear to have been in a long counter-revolution by law enforcement to restore its own impunity. Now they don’t sell people any more, but civil-asset forfeiture means they can make a tidy profit taking your stuff. The Exclusionary Rule has been whittled down to a polite fiction. “Testilying” has entered the lexicon. And just in the last few years, the arrogance of LE officials seems to have gotten more open and preening.

    3. #3 |  Nando | 

      Radley, the second to last bullet about the The Fairfield Minuteman newspaper doesn’t have a link to anything.

    4. #4 |  Josh K | 

      Nando:

      The article is titled “Silence Speaks Louder”. It’s an editorial.

      Here’s a link: http://tinyurl.com/5rv8zj

    5. #5 |  gospazha | 

      So why would they oppose allowing people to defend their homes from criminals?

      The law excludes the right to shoot officers who lawfully enter one’s home.

      I think the police union opposes the law because it might allow people to shoot police who unlawfully enter their homes.

      We can’t have THAT possibility, can we?

    6. #6 |  Frank | 

      And I’m supposed to be sympathetic towards these Jack-Booted Gestapo Thugs?

      If the bad apples were actively punished and removed on a regular basis, if the “good” ones didn’t actively shield the bad ones, I might be. But now, fuhgetaboutit.

      http://tinyurl.com/5ctoew

      Here’s another one. I wouldn’t piss on a Chicago cop if he was on fire. The entire department has told the peasants in no uncertain terms that our help is neither wanted nor necessary. Wonder why ‘cop-killer’ rap is so popular? The entire set of links is a good reason.

    7. #7 |  Jeff | 

      I don’t think the Castle Doctrine-opposing police need be so malign. They may think that people will shoot friends and family more often because of the law.

    8. #8 |  Packratt | 

      Here’s a wrong house raid story that came out of Yakima county, Washington a couple days ago.

      http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2008006146_apwawrongraid.html

      Apparently, the cops hit a house a mile away from their intended target. They grabbed the homeowner out of his shower and wouldn’t let him get dressed or dry off when they took him into custody, only to figure out later it was the wrong house.

      The good news… the county paid the poor guy nearly half a mill to settle.

    9. #9 |  Tokin42 | 

      Glad I missed these links earlier today, I would have spent my entire day irritable.

    10. #10 |  primus | 

      That’s nearly a quarter mill, not nearly a half mill.

    11. #11 |  Dave Hummels | 

      The fact that “law enforcement groups” (read police unions who have forgotten who their members are supposed to work for) would oppose Castle Doctrine legislation is truly pathetic. These laws protect potential vicitms of home invasion and their implementation would be an incremental step towards restoring the 4th Amendment. What the hell is so difficult about taking the time to announce “Police with a search warrant.” Why don’t you just come out and say, “we are above the law,” officers? Or, to paraphrase retired police chief Anthony Bouza, why don’t you just wipe your asses with the constitution. Then we would know where you really stand.

    12. #12 |  ohio newspaper | 

      [...] rally against a proposed Castle Doctrine law. Presumably, such a law would not include the righthttp://www.theagitator.com/2008/06/23/yer-monday-morning-roundup-of-raid-stories/For many slaves, Ohio was the Promised Land Louisville Courier-JournalThe John Parker House in [...]

    13. #13 |  Martial Law: A License to Loot, a Permit to Plunder « Kandylini’s | 

      [...] clearly seen in — among other things — recruitment pitches like this one (courtesy of Radley Balko) from a SWAT team in Rome, [...]

    14. #14 |  Martial Law: A License to Loot, a Permit to Plunder « THE EMERALD TRIANGLE NEWS MARIJUANA NEWS FROM MENDOCINO AND HUMBOLDT COUNTY | 

      [...] can be clearly seen in — among other things — recruitment pitches like this one (courtesy of Radley Balko) from a SWAT team in Rome, [...]

    15. #15 |  Martial Law: A License to Loot, a Permit to Plunder | Alternative News Sources | 

      [...] clearly seen in — among other things — recruitment pitches like this one (courtesy of Radley Balko) from a SWAT team in Rome, [...]

    16. #16 |  TruthNews.us » Blog Archive » Martial Law: A License to Loot, a Permit to Plunder | 

      [...] clearly seen in — among other things — recruitment pitches like this one (courtesy of Radley Balko) from a SWAT team in Rome, Georgia. Sphere: Related Content [...]

    17. #17 |  Rad Geek People’s Daily 2008-07-12 – No, seriously, I could swear the water in this pot is getting a little hotter… (#4) | 

      [...] (Via Radley Balko 2008-06-23.) [...]

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