“Creative Writing”

Thursday, June 5th, 2008

We’ve been talking about the problems with Chicago PD on this site for some time. Unfortunately, new Chicago PD Chief Jody Weis–the guy who’s supposed to clean all of this up–doesn’t seem to get it, either.

What say you, Justice Scalia?

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25 Responses to ““Creative Writing””

  1. #1 |  CitizenNothing | 

    Laws are for little people….

  2. #2 |  mrk | 

    Who gave Couric balls?

  3. #3 |  Windypundit | 

    Weis has made a few good changes. For example, the CPD website now offers a page for filing an official complaint about a cop. This is the first time I can recall that the site has ever admitted that cops might do anything wrong.

    Radley, if you’re going to keep poking at the Chicago Police Department, you might want to contact Jamie Kalven. He’s got some pretty good stories to tell:

    http://www.viewfromtheground.com/archive/2005/07/ktp-1-april-13-2003.html

  4. #4 |  Steve Verdon | 

    CPD ≡ Criminals.

  5. #5 |  Blue | 

    The word for today is “Nuremberg Defense.” Herrerra should be serving 25 to life for his civil rights violations. He’s not a hero, he’s a coward afraid of what thugs do to cops in prison. His cooperation shouldn’t excuse his behavior but perhaps it should be enough to keep him out of the general population, because that’s what his motivation is. It’s interesting to note how contrite people can be without a badge and a gun to hide behind.

    Can people be tried for war crimes in a civil war? You know Sherman would have solved the problem by burning Chicago to the ground, so I guess it hasn’t gotten that bad yet.

  6. #6 |  Against Stupidity | 

    I guess Weis doesn’t know the crime rate is always lower in a Police state, that’s assuming you don’t count the crimes committed by the police and the authorities.

  7. #7 |  Nick T | 

    #6 – At least I’m glad that Mr. Weis acknowledged that crime will go up when his Department is running clean. If he said he could still keep the streets just as “safe” or “crime free” we’d know we’re dealing with a fool.

    I worry that some will see this video as a justification for ends justify the means policing. But I think it’s pretty obviosu that America decided a long time ago that we’d accept a certain level of crime as the price for having enhanced freedoms and a transparent government (especially when it comes to those to whom we give the power to arrest and prosecute).

  8. #8 |  Matt Moore | 

    #7 – I’ve heard the occasional loss due to theft referred to as an “optimism tax” elsewhere.

  9. #9 |  Against Stupidity | 

    Why an “optimism tax”? I always thought it was the price we pay for a relatively free society.

  10. #10 |  Steve Verdon | 

    I worry that some will see this video as a justification for ends justify the means policing. But I think it’s pretty obviosu that America decided a long time ago that we’d accept a certain level of crime as the price for having enhanced freedoms and a transparent government (especially when it comes to those to whom we give the power to arrest and prosecute).

    I disagree Nick. I think all too many people are willing to cut guys like Herrera a lot of slack since he his getting the guns, drugs and criminals off the streets. The old, “You only have to worry if you are a criminal” mentality holds for quite a few people. Which is why nobody complains about the War on Drugs, cops using more and more aggressive/extra-constitutional tactics, etc.

    You saw the same thing in Afghanistan. When the Taliban moved into an area they were first considered saviors against vile and violent war lords. Then the Taliban institute their own vile and violent policies and the would be “good guys” became just as bad as the villians they replaced.

    Remember, power corrupts….

  11. #11 |  Dave Krueger | 

    This kind of stuff didn’t happen back in the days before there were cameras everywhere. Cameras are definitely causing a huge rise in police crime. There’s only one solution.

  12. #12 |  Packratt | 

    Scary stuff really… Makes me wonder how many police officers plot “paint jobs” for people who speak out against misconduct like us?

  13. #13 |  Dave Krueger | 

    #12 Packratt
    Scary stuff really… Makes me wonder how many police officers plot “paint jobs” for people who speak out against misconduct like us?

    Good question. If so, we’ll probably just start disappearing one by one. Anyone heard from UCrawford lately?

  14. #14 |  Dan Brown | 

    The latest in the case Windypundit’s link referred to:

    http://depaullaw.typepad.com/library/2008/06/city-appeals-ru.html

  15. #15 |  awake | 

    This cop is STILL playing the game. He belongs in jail for a very long time, but knows the best way to get off with just another slap on the wrist is to be the first one to pick-up the phone and become an informant for the prosecution. “I had the FBI on speed-dial.”

    Typical for a thug who has been playing the game for years. Just surprised his “mentor” didn’t do it first.

  16. #16 |  Packratt | 

    #12,

    I should have clarified, I meant that people who have sites that bring up stories of police misconduct, not necessarily people who commented on stories of police misconduct.

    A while back I had a bunch of Chicago cops visiting my site and some of them sent some pretty disturbing comments, and watching that 60 Minutes segment always makes me wonder just how serious those comments might have been. (let alone if there might be some disgruntled cops in my area just itching to send some “painters” my way.

    Sure, it might just be a case of PTSD from when I was abused in custody, but that also serves to remind me of how easy it is for officers to do things like that to people. But, hey, I understand from experience that it’s hard to convince those who haven’t experience it first hand that some officers have no moral compunction against harming people without justification.

  17. #17 |  awake | 

    Wait a second, from everything we know about the Chicago PD, we should be giving the plea deals to the officers that WERE trying to do the “paint jobs” on their fellows. Gang-on-gang violence has yet to cause me harm.

    And another thing, the police officer in this story is hiding a hell of lot of crap. He acts like stealing money was forced on him and that it was a big moral hurdle to overcome. Now that we know what he had been doing for years, I would be surprised to learn the murders I KNOW they committed were even moral hurdles.

    Reading between the lines; “I can’t murder my fellow officers. I’ve worked with them. I know their children. Now, point me in the direction of a lowly citizen and I will happily apply a base-coat or two. But, one of our own? THAT is where I draw the line.”

  18. #18 |  Dave Krueger | 

    #16 Packratt
    #12,
    I should have clarified, I meant that people who have sites that bring up stories of police misconduct, not necessarily people who commented on stories of police misconduct.

    Ah-ha! I just had a gander at your site. I will look at it again after work when I have more time.

    To be honest, I’m way too much of a pussy to be too critical of my local police on the internet. I’m no martyr. Cops are worse than a gang. They’re a gang with impunity. They don’t feel bound by the law. Prosecutors don’t charge them unless there’s no other choice. They cover for each other. The public sees them as the good guys. The public sees those who attack them as the bad guys. And many are self-righteous bullies. Being openly critical (especially with my sarcastic mouth) would be akin to poking a rattlesnake with a stick.

    Fortunately, sites like this are changing that, but I don’t doubt that there’s an element of danger to it and I think it will get more pronounced. On the list of the world’s most dangerous professions, blogging about cops might eventually be riskier than actually being a cop. haha!

    Doesn’t Amnesty International have a policy that criticism of any particular country is handled by chapters outside that country.

  19. #19 |  Wayne | 

    I wish I could see the end of the video, but it keeps hanging up on me. I think I get the gist of it anyway. I run across a lot of that “you only have to worry if you are a criminal” mentality and if it’s not that, it’s either “yeah, but it’s Chicago, this is East Bumfuck, we don’t have the same problems” or (less often) “it’s media hype.” Irrespective of the excuse, I always point out that back in the 30′s, the Nazis first came for the mentally retarded, then the criminals, then the rest of us, and what is happening here is really no different because the “criminals” class is actually a moving target because the definition is so easily changed. Tomorrow, if the gubmit decides to outlaw the possession of gold (which has happened before), those of us that refuse to turn ours in will be criminals. Or those of us that refuse to turn in our guns, or continue to read subversive literature, or continue to play poker, blah, blah …. Bastard bottom-feeders lacking any semblance of a moral compass, like the cop in the video, will be busting down my door — “just doin’ my job!”

  20. #20 |  Packratt | 

    #18

    Thanks… It’s pretty funny, when I started the site I didn’t expect cops to react in the ways they did to the site, thought they would understand the consequences of negative perceptions from bad behavior in that regard.

    I grew to learn they have no such fear since there will always be a sizable segment of the population that supports them no matter how badly they act. It’s the “Whatever it takes to get criminals off the streets” mentality that says it’s ok to harm a few innocent people for our cause… which is what leads to stories like this one out of Chicago I guess.

    Yeah, I used to get the “gee, what do you expect to happen when you write about police misconduct” line all the time when I’d say something about nasty messages I’d get from cops. I used to reply to them that “I expect them to be professional about it and accept criticism like grown men and women. I also expect them to stop acting in ways that gives me something to write about.”

    …in the end, though, I just got tired of addressing all the excuses people make for bad cops, so now generally I generally don’t bitch about the crap and threats officers give me for what I write these days because it really doesn’t give anyone any pause. But I still wonder how serious they might very well be.

    I guess people expect anyone who writes about police misconduct to be threatened by police, just like they expect to see a few innocent people end up as “collateral damage” and beaten down in the street during the “war on ____”… to me that says something pretty rotten about our level of expectations for police officers in this society and our society itself… but that’s probably just me.

  21. #21 |  JohnMcC | 

    Mr Verdon (in #10) and I both noticed the analogy to the present Administration, both determined that the law not burden them in their pursuit of ‘security’. Both observe vows of silence and discipline. Both justify lies and bloodshed. Both have charismatic leaders. Think of the CPD writ large, that is the GeoWBush Administration.

  22. #22 |  Dave Krueger | 

    Packratt, I have now had a look at your site and am fully ready to render an opinion as to whether you face any risk of violent lethal retaliation from the Seattle PD. Frankly, I’m surprised you’re not dead already.

    :) Just kidding. Excellent site. I’d say it’s no wonder you’re getting some anger from the cops, though. The problem with any close-knit group of people is that they feed each others emotions, but I don’t know of any cases where anyone has been really hurt because of a website. Nonetheless, it takes courage to take on police misconduct knowing that some of the people you’re embarrassing are not known for their ability to react in a rational measured way.

  23. #23 |  Packratt | 

    Dave,

    Thanks for saying so, but I know it’s not that great. While I’m a tech writer by trade, ever since I got a head injury last year my writing skills have bombed. That, and I know the site design just isn’t that great either.

    But, I’m trying… and I know that people have been getting information about where to turn when they’ve been victims of police misconduct where, without it, I know from experience that it’s a very confusing process.

    As for courage, I dunno… at times I think it might be just my being dumb.

    Take care.

  24. #24 |  supercat | 

    //Herrerra should be serving 25 to life for his civil rights violations.//

    Actually, I wouldn’t mind too much if a prosecutor gave some generous plea deals to such people in exchange for admitting, under oath, that by their actions, they had engaged in insurrection against the Constitution, and would thus be ineligible for any government position unless or until such time as Congress removed such disability (see USC Amendment XIV). The availability of such a plea deal may encourage rapid turnover of the people who need to be removed.

  25. #25 |  The Agitator » Blog Archive » The Sun-Times Embraces the Nanny State | 

    [...] decent chance those tapes would disappear in short order. Not sure why I would think such a thing. Just a hunch, I [...]

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