Weekend Links

Saturday, February 2nd, 2008
  • File this under, “Gee, ya’ think?”
  • This article is woefully thin on details, but if Wesley Snipes was using the “the income tax isn’t legitimate” defense, and a jury subsequently acquitted him, does that mean they actually bought it?
  • The skies are getting friendlier and friendlier.
  • I obviously think Arlen Specter is an idiot. But it’s awfully interesting that the NFL never spoke with this guy, isn’t it? And why destroy all the evidence?
  • Pretty cool…

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16 Responses to “Weekend Links”

  1. #1 |  Mikestermike | 

    Why should the government be involved in the Pat’s cheating event(s)? I am trying to find out why anyone cares what exactly happened…I just want to be assured it is not continuing to happen…..remember, the Pats broke no laws, just the rules set out by the NFL. And they have been financially punished for it, among other things…that’s it. It ends. Unless the NFL is trying to hide something more sinister, and more appropriately, illegal, these grandstanding beltway acne need to just stop, ya know..

    Besides, the G-men’s D will take the Pats 28-17…..

  2. #2 |  Kevin B. O'Reilly | 

    Radley, I’m not sure if you’re being sarcastic with your Wesley Snipes comment. Snipes’ acquittal does not mean the jury believed the income tax is illegal or somehow doesn’t apply to him. The legal test is whether Snipes honestly and sincerely believed that the laws did not apply to him. In which case, he’s still on the hook for the money he owes the government but is not guilty of fraud.

    Briand Doherty’s article on the tax protest movement:
    http://tinyurl.com/yscxv3

  3. #3 |  Skip Oliva | 

    “But it’s awfully interesting that the NFL never spoke with this guy, isn’t it? And why destroy all the evidence?”

    Actually, I don’t find it the least bit interesting. Of course, I’m not a Colts fan like Radley or a socialist central planner like Gregg Easterbrook.

  4. #4 |  UCrawford | 

    The NFL destroyed the tapes because they didn’t have any evidence that Belichick was doing any more than he disclosed that he was doing and the Patriots claimed that they turned over everything to the NFL. The reasoning behind it, according to Peter King who talked to the commissioner’s office on it, was that if they destroyed the tapes it meant that any copies that surfaced in the future must therefore have been held back by the Patriots and the commissioner is free to take harsher action against Belichick (including long-term suspension). It makes sense and the flap over this is ridiculous because a) it’s none of Congress’ business how the NFL runs its disciplinary proceedings, b) the general consensus by people with expertise on it is that the benefit of what Belichick did is negligible, c) the punishment the Patriots received was the harshest ever imposed for such infractions (the second harshest, I believe was loss of a 3rd rounder), and d) this is mainly a by-product of fans of and people who bet on opposing teams whining about the fact that things didn’t go their way because Belichick is an amazingly talented coach, and they just need to accept that and get over it. Nobody cared about this when he was a losing coach over in Cleveland and the allegations of him doing this have gone back that far, so it apparently wasn’t enough of an advantage to save his job there. The Patriots win because they generally assemble better rosters and do a better job of executing their game plans…period.

    And no, I’m not a Patriots fan, I support the Chiefs who couldn’t have made the playoffs this year if the other teams’ coaches mailed them their gameplans.

  5. #5 |  B | 

    J’aime la France…

  6. #6 |  Michael Pack | 

    Radley,why should private concern talk to a senator about a internal matter.I can’t stand the Pat’s or their coach.As a Browns fan I’m not enamored with the Colt’s and their lay down the last game of the season against the Titans.Yet I take this for what it is,entertainment.The NFL is no different that NCIS,Stargate Atlantis or other shows.The exception being the players suffer massive injuries and can not access some of the cutting edge meds to heal [HGH]Partly due to Congress.

  7. #7 |  David Chesler | 

    Tapes should never be destroyed. Maybe sealed juvenile records, but not this. It’s going to come up again. If nothing else there was an article in the Boston Herald about how the Patriots are trying to collect memorabilia from the years when they were worse than the Colts. How much room could the tapes have taken up in the NFL offices?

    The government gets involved because major league sports get some special dispensations, particularly as regards anti-trust. Today it would be a public corporation type thing.

    As for your cool video, the coolest thing is the rest of the New Yorkers who just went about their business. In the past year Boston wet its collective pants three times, with Aqua Teen Hunger Force lite-brites, with Star Simpson’s blinkie circuit board at Logan, and (this doesn’t get so much press) when the bomb squad blew up a traffic detector box. (It comes of necessity, and it comes with a price, so that’s why I’m raising my children in flyover country, but I miss that New York attitude.)

  8. #8 |  Radley Balko | 

    To be clear, I don’ think it’s any of Congress’ business (anti-trust exemption or no), and I think Specter’s off his rocker.

    It is possible to believe NFL was wrong to destroy the tapes and that the investigation was fishy, while also understanding that Congress has no business butting in.

  9. #9 |  Skip Oliva | 

    “It is possible to believe NFL was wrong to destroy the tapes and that the investigation was fishy, while also understanding that Congress has no business butting in.”

    I’m still unclear as to why it was wrong. What standard are you using?

  10. #10 |  ZappaCrappa | 

    We could look at his on the brightside. As long as congress involves themselves in pro sports, they have less opportunity to screw the rest of us.

  11. #11 |  Tom Bux | 

    F the Patriots and Tom Brady’s illigitimate son.

  12. #12 |  Justin | 

    Similar to your video: here

  13. #13 |  Robert | 

    So, how to use co-ordinated crowd actions in a political manner?

  14. #14 |  enormous iNCoNgrUiTieS » Blog Archive » Freeze tag big | 

    […] The Agitator) Read […]

  15. #15 |  lurch | 

    Radley, your “Bill Polian” is showing. Every head coach in the NFL is doing something they shouldn’t be doing to try to get an edge. EVERY ONE OF THEM. None of them will admit it (for obvious reasons), but guys who aren’t looking for a sideline job any more (like Jimmy Johnson and Bill Parcells) have said it.

  16. #16 |  Thomas Paine's Goiter | 

    To be clear, I don’ think it’s any of Congress’ business (anti-trust exemption or no), and I think Specter’s off his rocker.

    Bulllllllllllllllshit. If the NFL doesn’t want the government nosing around in their business, they can certainly petition the government to drop their anti-trust exemption. Until such a time exists, the government is free to do whatever it damn well pleases with the league.

    Something about cake and eating it too comes to mind.

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